About New Data Families Links Query Search Home
 

Descendants of Benjamin Jones
Contributed by John Norvill Jones

 

 

Generation No. 1

 

1.  BENJAMIN2 JONES  (JOHN1) was born Abt. 1720 in Hanover/New Kent County, Virginia ?, and died Abt. May 1777 in Bute County, North Carolina1.  He married JOHANNAH PERRY2 Unknown, daughter of PERRY and UNKNOWN.  She was born Abt. 1724 in Virginia?, and died Abt. 1780 in Warren County, NC.

 

Notes for BENJAMIN JONES:

Benjamin Jones #1, who died in Bute County, North Carolina in about May 1777 (Warren Co., NC WB-2, p. 122),  is my earliest Jones ancestor for whom definitive records have been found.  

 

The only known personal history of my Jones family was a short biographical sketch written on October 7, 1917 by Oliver Smith Jones, great, great grandson of Benjamin Jones #1 and a brother of my grandfather, Nathan Henry Jones.  In a memoir written for his daughter, Oliver Smith Jones stated: "My grandfather (author's note: another Benjamin Jones) was a son of Thomas Jones who came to America from Scotland in 1755."  The Thomas Jones to whom he refers was the eldest son of Benjamin Jones #1 the subject of these notes. No proof has been found so far that would support Oliver Jones' statement that Thomas Jones arrived in America in 1755.  This Jones family arrived long before then.  How long before has not been determined.

 

Circumstantial evidence shows that Benjamin Jones #1 and his family came to Granville County, North Carolina (it later became Bute then Warren County) in the 1740s-1750s from Hanover/New Kent County, Virginia although Benjamin Jones' name does not appear in any known New Kent or Hanover County records for this era.  However, the name John Jones, Jr.,  probably Benjamin's father, is in New Kent County, Virginia public records in the first decade of the 1700s.  John Jones. Benjamin's brother, is in the Hanover County, Virginia records (Hanover County was formed from New Kent County in 1720) during the 1730s and 1740s.

 

A 1764 deed to his brother, John Jones, states that John was from "New Kent County, Virginia" from which Hanover County was created (Bute Co., NC DB-A, p. 163).  Another deed involving John's son, Adam Jones, stated that Adam was from "Virginney" (op. cit., p. 13).  There were also others who came down  from Hanover County, Virginia to Granville County, NC during this period. Gideon Macon, for one, was an early leader in local Granville/Bute affairs. Thomas Christmas who became a prominent citizen of the new Warren County, North Carolina was also from Hanover County.  Shirley Whatley was another from Hanover County who became active in Bute/Warren County, NC.  And, there were Isaac and William Acree and Henry Talley from the Jones' own Hanover County parish precinct. William Acree migrated from Warren County, NC to Wilkes Co., Georgia in the mid -1780s, the same period during which a number of Jones brothers migrated to the same county.  Henry Talley went on to migrate to Georgia, near the Jones's, via South Carolina and, in Georgia, his grandson, Isham Talley, married a Jones girl.

 

Another proof of the Jones connection to Hanover/New Kent County, Virginia is seen from the service in the Revolution of  Adam Jones, Benjamin Jones' nephew.   Although Adam Jones was living with his father, John Jones, in Bute County, NC when the revolution began, he joined Company "C" of the 2nd Virginia Regiment of the Continental Line, a company formed in Hanover County by Captain George Nicholas.  

 

It appears that there were three Jones brothers, perhaps four, who came down from Virginia to North Carolina at different times beginning with Richard who in 1744 applied for a land grant in Edgecombe County in an area that later became Granville/Bute/Warren County).  He was followed by John who was on Granville County records by 1747 and Benjamin who was on  the 1757 list of tithables.  Samuel Jones who received a Granville land grant in 1760 may have been a fourth brother. 

 

When Benjamin Jones came to North Carolina the area where he settled was wilderness, no towns as such and widely scattered homesteads.  Primitive wilderness when Benjamin and his brothers arrived, the area grew and prospered.  By the outbreak of the Civil War, Warren County had become the most prosperous county in North Carolina.

 

This locale is pivotal in studying migration in the Southern colonies and states.  The Old Indian Trading Road passed through Bute County near Benjamin Jones' land on Hawtree Creek.  Many people from eastern Virginia came to Bute.  Some families settled there permanently.  Others stayed for only a few years or a generation, as the Jones' did.  Many left Bute for western North Carolina or to go south to South Carolina and Georgia.  Some of Benjamin Jones' children did both, first going west to Wilkes County, North Carolina and then, by a coincidence of names, from there to Wilkes County, Georgia.

 

Initially, Benjamin Jones' family lived in the Hawtree Creek section of North central Bute County near the Virginia border. Bute County, named for John Stewart, Earl of Bute, a supporter of King George III, had a short life of only fifteen years.  In the midst of the Revolution, in 1779, residents the North Carolina petitioned the General Assembly to divide the county in half.  Among the signers were James Jones, John Gilreath,  William Gilreath, James Gilreath, William Noles, Brittain Jones, Frederick Jones, Henry Jones, Daniel Pegram and John Wright.  The general  assembly approved and the county was divided. The southern half became Franklin County, for Benjamin Franklin, and the Northern half Warren County, for Dr. Warren a hero of Bunker Hill.  Around the time of Benjamin Jones' death in 1777, some of his children and their families moved south to the Tar River area which in 1779 became a part of the new county of Franklin.

 

When Benjamin Jones first appeared on the scene, an Indian trading path leading north to Petersburg, Virginia and southest to Hillsboro, NC passed just to the west of Hawtree Creek.  The path crossed the Roanoke River by the "Moniseep" horse ford at Walnut Tree Landing.

 

Genealogical research in old Granville/Bute County is made difficult by the presence in the county of so many Jones with the same first names.  There were, for example, at least four Benjamin Jones' in Bute during the Colonial period and the 1777 tax roll for the Hawtree District listed three John Jones.   Sorting out these Jones' has been difficult so mistakes may have been made.

 

Although both John and Richard Jones' names were on 1754 muster list for Captain Richard Coleman's company of Granville County militia, Benjamin Jones' was not.  Since he was on James Paine's 1757 list of tithables for St. John's Parish it appears that he came to Granville County sometime between 1754 and 1757.  That record lists a "Benja. Jones" along with others who, according to subsequent land records, were relatives or neighbors of our Benjamin Jones. These were his brother Richard Jones, David Young, who became Benjamin's son-in-law, Joseph Wright who later witnessed Benjamin's will and Edward "Knowls" and William Gilreath, fathers of sons who would marry two of Benjamin's daughters (NC Archives, C. R. 044.701.20, 1757 Granville County Tithes, List of James Paine).  Thomas Person's 1758 list of tithables for Granville County shows Benjamin Jones living next to David Young with John Wright and William Wright on the other side (op. cit., 1758  Granville County Tithes, list of Thomas Person).  James Young, David Young's father, is living nearby.

 

A few years later, on May 1, 1762,  Benjamin Jones was a chain carrier in a survey for a 700 acre Granville grant to Nicholas Robinson of land near Hawtree Creek (Land Patent Book 14, Granville Grants, p. 49).  The location of the tract was described as on branches of Hawtree Creek, adjoining Hawkin's corner, Young's corner, Glover's line, Bullard's (Ballard? line and Nicholson's line.  The 1762-1763 list of tithables show Benjamin Jones and Nicholas Robinson as adjoining neighbors.  Of note also is the 1754 muster of members of Captain Richard Coleman's militia Company for Granville County which lists John Jones, Benjamin's brother, next to Nicholas Robinson.    Perhaps the definitive evidence of the relationship between Benjamin and John Jones is  John Hawkins' 1771 tax list for Bute County.  It shows Benjamin and his sons, Thomas and Adam, in a household next to his brother John and his sons, Benjamin and Adam (NC Archives, C. R. 015.701.1, 1771 List of John Hawkins).  This indicates that Thomas and Adam were Benjamin's oldest sons.  

 

A series of land transactions in the late 1750s and early 1760s relating to two  tracts of land near Hawtree Creek involved these Jones'.

 

1. The first parcel was of 640 acres which William Young recieved by grant on May 28, 1756. The land was described as being located on the Mill Branch adjoining Phil Hawkins line (Granville Co., NC DB-C, p. 261).

 

2. The second parcel was a tract of 192 acres which John and Mary Hawkins deeded to David Young, Benjamin Jones' son-in-law, on March 7, 1758 for 21 pounds (Granville Co., NC DB-C, p. 439).  The land was described as being located on the lower side of Hawtree Creek adjoining Dansbe's line.

 

3.  The next transaction was on August 7, 1764 when William Young, David Young's uncle, and his wife, "Betey", sold a tract of 490 acres, apparently part of the 640 acres above, to Adam Jones of "Virginney" for 150 pounds (Warren Co, NC DB-A, p. 13).  The land was described as located on Ashley's Branch, adjoining Phil Hawkins, Porter and the Mill Branch.   Adam Jones was probably the son of John Jones.  The "of Virginney" may not have meant that Adam Jones was newly arrived from Virginia but to distinguish him from another Adam Jones living in Bute County.

 

4. On September 29, 1764, David and Ann Jones Young sold the 192 acres (from transaction #2), described as "where I now live", to John Jones "of New Kent County, Virginia" for 150 pounds (Granville Co., NC DB-A, p. 88).  The designation of John Jones as from New Kent County was probably to differentiate him from another John Jones then living in the county, not as a new resident of Granville County who came from New Kent County.  The land was described as being on the East side of Hawtree Creek adjoining the "Old Trading Path."  The deed was witnessed by Joshua Gray, William Archer, Godfree Jones (son of John Jones) and Thomas Jones.  The Thomas Jones was probably the son of Benjamin Jones, John Jones' brother, and a brother of Ann Young.

 

5. Five months later, on January 26, 1765, Adam Jones deeded the tract of 490 acres (from transaction #3) plus a Negro named Jack, considerable livestock and furniture  to John Jones, his father,  for 200 pounds (Warren County, N. C. DB-A, p. 89).  There was no record of a relinquishment of dower so Adam Jones was probably a widower.

 

6. On April 12, 1765, John Jones sold this same tract of 490 acres, the Negro Jack, the livestock and furniture to Samuel Croxton for 200 pounds Warren Co., NC DB-A, p. 209).  The deed was witnessed by Adam Jones, Godfree Jones and Jeremiah Ellis. There was no mention of dower rights.

 

7. On that same date, April 12, 1765, John Jones deeded the 192 acres (transactions #2 and 4) to his son, Godfree Jones, for the nominal amount of 20 pounds (Warren Co., NC DB-A, p. 163).  The deed was witnessed by Adam Jones, Samuel Croxton and Jeremiah Ellis. 

 

8. Four months after these deeds, on August 5, 1765, Godfree Jones sold the 192 acre tract he obtained from his father (in transaction #7), back to David Young of "Rowan County" for 150 pounds, the same amount John Jones paid David Young and his wife for the land in the previous year (Warren County, NC DB-1, p. 362).  The deed described the property as "all that tract of land where my father now lives."

 

9.  Two weeks later, Samuel Croxton, on August 20, 1765, sold the tract of 490 acres (from transaction #6) to Benjamin Jones, Jr. for 130 pounds (Warren Co., NC DB-A p. 209).  The sale did not include the Negro, the livestock or the furniture.  Witnesses to the deed were Adam Jones, John Jones and John Herndon. Dower was not mentioned.  The designation of Benjamin Jones as "Jr." indicated that one or more older Benjamin Jones's resided in the county.  It is likely that the "Benjamin Jones, Jr." in this transaction was my gggggrandfather since nine years later, in 1774,an older, infirm Bemjamin Jones was declared a pauper by the Bute County court ("Bute County North Carolina Court Minutes", Brent H. Holcomb, p. 182)  Although no deed or grant has been located for him, our Benjamin Jones had his own household as early as 1757 when he is on the a Granville County  list of tithables.

 

It is not clear what these transactions signify but they seem to indicate some type of land speculation.

 

                            --------------------------------------------------------

Processioners returns in 1766 for the St. John's Parish precinct that included Benjamin Jones show that his neighbors were: Richard Ballard, David King, "The Parson", John Nicholson, Mark Thornton, William King, John Jones, William Pattershall, Samuel Bell, David Young, Alex. Holson, Benjamin Jones and Sarah Johnston (Bute County Processioners Returns 1766-1778, p. 1, NC Archives). 

 

In 1767, our Benjamin Jones, his daughter, Jane Darnall, and David Young were witnesses for Charles Darnall in an action for trespass he brought against the estate of Samuel Croxton.  The jury initially awarded Darnall 7 pounds but the court considered this excessive and reduced it to 5 pounds plus costs (NC Archives, Bute County Court, Clerk of Pleas Recording Docket 1764-1778, p. 44).  

 

In 1770, David Young, Benjamin Jones' son-in-law, and Wm. Hansill were processioners for the district where Benjamin lived. Their returns show that John Jones was present when Benjamin Jones, "Jr."'s land was surveyed and that David Young was present when the land of Charles Darnall was processioned (op. cit., p. 9).  The "Jr." designation shows that an older Benjamin Jones was also living in the area, probably the one whom, in 1774, the county court sought to have declared a pauper for tax purposes.

 

John Hawkins 1771 tax list for Bute County shows Benjamin and his sons, Thomas and Adam, in a household next to his brother John and his sons, Benjamin and Adam (NC Archives, C. R. 015.701.1, 1771 List of John Hawkins).  This indicates that Thomas and Adam were Benjamin's oldest sons.  David Young was two households away on the tax list.

 

On January 30, 1775, Benjamin Jones. Jr. sold 20 acres to Thomas Glover, Jr. for 6 pounds (Warren County, NC DB-5, 154).  The land was described as on the South side of Ashley's Branch adjoining Atkins, Young, probably David Young, and Benjamin Ellis.  The deed was witnessed by Thomas Miller, Jr., Benjamin Ellis and John Pope and proved by Ellis in the February session of the Bute County court.

 

The May 1775 Bute County court records show a sale of cattle by Britain Jones, Benjamin's nephew, to Henry Foote which mentions the cattle marks of Benjamin Jones, Sr. and Mrs, Catherine Hardwick (Bute County Record Bk. 2, p. 56).  So far, no record has been found of the registration of Benjamin Jones' mark.

 

Benjamin Jones, Jr. sold another small tract of land a month later to Benjamin Ellis, Jr. (op. cit., p. 156).  This was 20 acres sold for 9 pounds.  This was on Ashley's Branch adjoining Young.  Witnesses were Amasa Palmer, Thomas Glover and W. Bolthrop. 

 

The 1777 tax list for the Hawtree Tax District shows these Jones and related men living in close proximity and the amount of their taxable property:

 

John Gilreath, husband of Johanna Jones - poll only

John Jones, brother of Benjamin - poll only

Benjamin Jones - 212 pounds

Adam Jones, son of John - poll only

James Jones, probably Benjamin's son - poll only

Charles Darnall, husband of Jane Jones - 87 pounds

David Young, husband of Ann Jones - 270 pounds, 6 shillings

 

Benjamin Jones' will, signed by his mark,  is dated June 15, 1776 (Bute County, NC Record Book 2, p. 122).  The original is in the NC Archives in Raleigh.  In it he leaves his farm and  household goods to his wife, "Johannar" (Johannah), for her lifetime or until remarriage, the land to be under the control of John Gilreath, co-executor with Johannah of his estate.  John Gilreath was the husband of his daughter, also a Johannah.   After his widow's death, the land was to be divided between sons William and Samuel and they were to share his other assets equally with John Gilreath.   Six named daughters, Ann Young, Cathron (Catherine) Noles, Elizabeth Beard, Jane Darnall, Saraham Jones and Susannah Jones,  and the remaining three sons, Thomas, James and Adam, received one shilling each.  Daughter Johannah was not named in the will, probably because Benjamin had already given her a share through her husband, John Gilreath.

 

The general practice in North Carolina at this time was for the testator to leave the farm home to the youngest son. So, if this tradition was followed by Benjamin, sons William and Samuel were probably the youngest of his five sons.   Since the other three sons received only a shilling each, it seems likely that Benjamin believed he had already given Thomas, Adam  and James their fair share.  I have assumed both that they were the three eldest sons and that the order in which the daughters were named reflected their respective ages. 

 

The will was witnessed by another Benjamin Jones, his nephew, and Joseph Wright, a neighbor.  In May 1774, the Bute County Court ordered that Joseph Wright replace John Jones, probably Benjamin's brother, as overseer of a road on the north side of Hawtree Creek (op. cit., p. 169).  He continued in that capacity for some time (op. cit., p. 211, 248).  

 

Benjamin died within a year of making his will.  It was recorded in the May 1777 term of the Bute County court and John Gilreath filed an inventory of the estate with the Bute County court on February 9, 1778 ("Bute Co. NC Minutes of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions 1767-1779", Brent H. Holcomb). 

 

Other than an unknown amount of land, this was his property:

 

16 head of cattle

8 head of hogs

1 horse, bridle and saddle

2 beds and furniture

2 chests

2 jam pots (probably "thunder mugs")

1 cotton wheel & 1 flax wheel

1 frying pan and 1 earthen pot

6 plates & 1 pewter dish

3 pewter Bassons (?)

2 rope hooks

6 ducks

12 spoons

2 plough hoes, 3 weeding hoes, 1 pair shears

1 ax, 6 rush bottom chairs

1 oak table, 3 "old" bedsteads

1 old pair cotton cards

1 knife and fork, 1 old pine pigon (?), 2 wash tubs

1 old weaving loom

765 1/2 pounds of tobacco

 

John Gilreath did not put a valuation on the inventory .

 

Benjamin Jones' death seemed to have prompted a number of his children to depart for the more virgin lands of the Tar River region in what is now Franklin County, North Carolina.  Records show that these sons and daughters of Benjamin and Johannah Jones were in the Cedar Creek/Crooked Creek area of Bute County shortly after his death:

 

                    Thomas Jones      Mid-1777 (on Capt. Ferrill's tax list)

                    Ann Young            Mid-1777 (on Capt. Ferrill's tax list)

                    Jane Darnall         May 10, 1777 (Charles Darnall bought land)

                    Adam Jones          Mid-1778 (on Capt. Ferrill's tax list)

                    James Jones        Mid-1778 (on Capt. Ferrill's tax list)

                    Susanna Jones     After June 1778 (Adam Jones' enlistment)

 

William Jones probably went south with his brothers also but was underage and, thus, not on the tax or land records for this part of Bute County.  But since he went west with Thomas and James to Wilkes County in 1778, it is reasonable that he was with them in the Tar River area before they left for Wilkes.  None of the five Jones brothers are on Captain Colclough's list of those in the Hawtree Creek area who took the 1778 oath of allegience to North Carolina in opposition to King George III (List for Captain Colclough's District, Misc. County Records, P. C. 123.9, NC Archives).  All had either gone south to the Tar River area or were under age and not required to sign.

 

Under Benjamin's will, William and Samuel Jones were residual heirs to the farm.  Perhaps William decided that the farm was not large enough for the two of them, or he may have been more affected by wanderlust than Samuel.  In any case, it seems that Samuel did not go west to Wilkes County, NC with his three brothers and stayed behind for at least a brief period.  In 1780, John Gilreath, who had control over Benjamin's farm, also went west to Wilkes County. 

 

Athough there is not a clear picture of what happened to Benjamin Jones' land, tax records show the following:

 

- - - For the year he died, Benjamin Jones' was assessed for property worth 212 pounds on the 1777 Hawtree Creek tax list ("List of Taxables Bute County 1777-1778", p 13, NC Archives).  Samuel Jones is not on the list, probably because he was under age.  John Gilreath is taxed for a poll only.

 

- - - Samuel Jones appears, for the first time, on the 1778 Bute County tax list in Captain John Colclough's District with taxable property valued at 390 pounds (op. cit., p. 41).  John Gilreath is in the same district taxed on property of 36 pounds, 9 shillings and 1/2 pence.  So it appears that Samuel is being taxed on the land and property that belonged to his father who died in the preceeding year.

                                                        

- - - Samuel is not on the 1779 tax list for the Smith's Creek and Hawtree Creek District but John Gilreath's taxable property in that district has increased from 36 pounds in the previous year to 507 pounds.  It seems that John Gilreath is now being taxed for the bulk of Benjamin Jones' estate.  Samuel Jones was one of the many Jones's who migrated from North Carolina to Georgia in the mid-1780s.

 

By the mid-1780s, four out of five of Benjamin and Johannah's sons, Thomas, James, Adam and Samuel had migrated to the Long Creek area of Wilkes County (later Warren County), Georgia.  They were joined later by their sister Jane Darnall and her husband, Charles, and a number of their former neighbors from Bute County.  The wanderlust expressed by the phrase, "Gone to Georgia", was a real one for the Jones family.

 

Notes for JOHANNAH PERRY:

Although there is no positive proof that Johannah Jones' maiden name was Perry, this has been assumed, based on traditional naming patterns, by researchers from the Kentucky branch of the Gilreath family.  Until proven otherwise, I accept this decision.

 

Circumstantial evidence indicates that Johannah Perry was a sister of the "Seven Perry Brothers".  Some Perry family genealogists say that in about 1746 seven Perry brothers, Jeremiah, John, Francis, Joshua, Nathaniel, William and Burrell, moved to  Granville County  from Virginia because they were displeased with their father's second marriage. One Perry has been found on early Granville County (became Bute Co. in 1764) records involving the Jones brothers.  This was Micajah Perry who witnessed a deed on December 18, 1752 from William Stroud to John Jones, Benjamin's brother (Granville Co., NC DB-B, p. 166).  

 

The seven Perry brothers settled in the southern portion of Bute County that, in 1779, became Franklin County.  This area is now in the Harris Township. The roster of the 1754 militia for Granville County (Col. William Eaton's Regiment of Militia),  lists six Perry males, William, Jeremiah, John, Nathaniel, Francis and Michael (Micajah?) as members of Captain Osborn Jeffrey's Company, the company for the Crooked Creek/Cedar Creek area.  Only Burrell is not named and he was probably underage.   At least six of Benjamin and Johannah Jones' children Thomas, Adam, James and Susannah Jones,  Ann Young,  and, Jane Darnall, later lived in this part of Franklin County.  In 1791 when Charles and Ann Darnall sold their land in Franklin County, NC preparatory to moving to Georgia, it was to Jeremiah Perry.

 

A number of members of both the Jones and Perry families migrated to Georgia after the Revolution.  In the 1790s,  Burrell Perry, along with his brother Willis and sister Priscilla, were living in the Williams and Long Creek area of Wilkes/Warren County, Georgia.  By that time, Thomas, Adam, James and Samuel Jones, sons of Benjamin and Johannah Jones and, possibly, cousins to Burrell, Willis and Priscilla, had also migrated to Long Creek. Willis Perry was on the list of original members of the Long Creek Baptist Church in which the Jones family was so active.  On the list of original members there was also a Burrell Jones whose relationship to the Jones brothers is not known. Later some of the Perrys in Wilkes/Warren County moved to Jackson County, Georgia as did Thomas, James  and Burrell Jones. 

 

Benjamin Jones's will of 1776 gave his wife, "Johannar" (Johannah), his farm for use during her lifetime or widowhood. But the land was to be under the management of her son-in-law, John Gilreath, the husband of their daughter, also named Johannah.  By early 1780, John and Johannah Gilreath migrated to Wilkes County indicating that Johannah Jones had died and John was no longer responsible for running the late Benjamin Jones' farm.

     

Children of BENJAMIN JONES and JOHANNAH PERRY are:

                    i.    THOMAS3 JONES, b. Abt. 1743, Virginia ?3,4; d. Abt. Apr 1803, Jackson County, Georgia; m. MARY, Unknown, Bute County, North Carolina; b. Unknown; d. Aft. 1811, Warren Co., GA ?5.

 

Notes for THOMAS JONES:

We do not know where or when Thomas Jones was born but by 1764 he was of legal age, on the list of taxables, and living in Bute County, North Carolina with his father Benjamin Jones.  After the Revolution he migrated to Georgia along with many other settlers seeking free or cheap land.  His brothers Adam, Samuel and James Jones, arrived in Wilkes County, Georgia at about the same time.  Nathan Fowler, who would later have a close relationship with the Thomas Jones family, migrated to Georgia during this same post-Revolution period.

 

Here are some items from Granville/Bute/WarrenFranklin County records about Thomas Jones:

 

- -   -  The 1762 list of tithables for Granville County shows Thomas Jones, as a "free man", living in the household of David Young who was married to Thomas' sister, Ann (NC Archives, C. R. 044.701.20, Granville County Tax List).

 

 - - - On August 7, 1764, he was a witness, by his mark, to a deed from William Young (David Young's uncle) and his wife "Betey" to Adam Jones of "Virginney" for the sale, for 150 pounds Virginia money, of 490 acres on "Ashle's" (Ashley's) Branch, a tributary to Hawtree Creek . The land was located on both sides of the Mill Branch and adjoining landowners were Phillip (Philemon Hawkins and Porter. The deed was also witnessed by Daniel Ford, James Young (David Young's father) and John Pope (Bute County, North Carolina DB-A, p. 13).  Thomas Jones proved the deed in court in August 1764.

 

 - - - On September 29, 1764, Thomas Jones was witness to a deed from David Young and his wife Ann (by her mark)  for the sale of 192 acres "where I now live" to John Jones, Thomas' uncle, of New Kent County, Virginia for 150 pounds.  This land had been bought by David Young from George Tillman and was located on the East side of Hawtree Creek adjoining the Old (Indian) Trading Path (Bute County, NC DB-A, p. 88).  Other witnesses were Joshua Gray, William Archer and Godfree (Godfrey) Jones, son of the buyer and Thomas' cousin.  Ann Young  was Benjamin Jones' daughter and Thomas' sister.

 

- - - On June 22, 1766, Thomas Jones, David Young, his brother-in-law, and Duelle Darnall were witnesses to a deed from William Pattershall, Sr. to Thomas and John Pattershall (Warren Co., NC DB-3, p. 307).

 

- - -The 1771 tax list of John Hawkins, Sr. shows Thomas and his brother Adam living with their father, Benjamin Jones, next to the home of John Jones, their uncle, who had his sons Benjamin and Adam living with him (NC Archives, Private Collection 123.9, Pittman Papers, Bute Taxables - 1771, List of John Hawkins, Sr.). All four of the younger Jones' were of taxable age.

 

- - -  Thomas Jones, by his mark, on June 11, 1774  made a deed to James Ronaldson and Company of Bute County conveying 120 acres, a black mare and colt, 7 head of cattle, 20 head of hogs, farm equipment and household goods to secure a debt of 48 pounds, 13 shillings and 1 pence (Bute Co., NC DB-5, p. 224). Adjoining landowners were John Jones, Thomas Glover and David King and the property was described as being on the road from Frederick Malone's to Black's Ferry.  The deed was witnessed by Thomas Miller, Jr., John King Rosser and Mary (by mark) Miller.  The deed was proved by Thomas Miller, Jr. in the February 1775 term of court. Miller was an attorney. Two years earlier, Charles Darnall mortgaged property to the same firm, an active money lender in the area.  The origin of this tract of 120 acres has not been found.

 

- -- -  Sometime before mid-1777, when tax lists were prepared, Thomas Jones moved south to Crooked Creek, a tributary to the Tar River, an area which in 1779 became part of Franklin County.  He is on Captain Bryant Ferrell's list of taxables in 1777 assessed for 100 pounds.  Ann Young, his sister, is in the same district assessed for 264 pounds.

 

- - -  On June 8, 1778, Thomas Jones, after moving to the Tar River area, bought the above 120 acres for 25 pounds, less the livestock and other property, from John King Rosser (Bute Co., NC DB-7, p. 253).  The deed described the tract as on the North side of Malone Road.  The land adjoined that of David King, John Ellington and Benjamin Jones, John Jones's son.  The deed was witnessed by Anthony Barnett, James Burke and Thomas Willson and proved by Burke in the November 1778 term of court.  This may have been some type of financial settlement involving the previous mortgage on the property.

 

- - - In February 1778 Thomas Jones, in Captain Ferrell's district in the Crooked Creek area, signed the oath of allegience to North Carolina in opposition to King George III (Pittman Papers, P. C. 123.9, NC Archives).  None of the five Jones brothers were on the list of those who signed the oath in Captain Colclough's District in upper Bute County, the district where the Benjamin Jones family grew up.  It is possible that Thomas was the only one of age (21) at the time.  However, Thomas, James and William all filed for land grants in Wilkes County later that year, indicating that all three were then twenty one or over.

 

- - - In 1778, Thomas and his brother, Adam Jones, are both in Capt. Ferrell's district, Thomas assessed for property valued at 202 pounds and Adam for 132 pounds.  Brother James Jones, located near Ann Young, is in the district also assessed for only a poll tax.

 

- - On May 11, 1778 Thomas, by mark, and Charles Darnall, husband of Jane Jones, gave a security guarantee for Ann Young, Thomas' sister, as administrator of the estate of her deceased husband, David Young.

 

- - - On January 5, 1779, while temporarily back in Bute County from Wilkes county, Thomas Jones sold the 120 acre tract in the Hawtree Creek area to Benjamin Ellis, a substantial landowner, receiving 52 pounds, 10 shillings in Virginia money (Bute County, NC DB-7, p. 189).  The deed named  the adjoining property owners as Benjamin and James Jones, his cousins, John Ellington and David King.  The deed, witnessed by James Young, his nephew, and James Jones, his brother who, apparently, travelled back to Bute with him.  It  was proved in the February 1779 term of the Bute Court  by James Young. 

 

- - - In a deed dated September 4, 1779  John Ferrell, Jr. sold Thomas Jones 130 acres for 100 pounds.  The land was described as lying on the south side of Crooked Creek, on which Thomas' sister Ann Paschall lived, adjoining Jones (probably his brother Adam) and Joseph Bridges.  Witnesses were Isaac Pipen and William Fish.   More research is needed on these 1778-1779 land transactions in Warren and Franklin County involving Thomas Jones.

                                                         -----------------------------------                                                     

Sometime in 1778 Thomas Jones and his brothers James and William migrated west from then Bute County to the newly formed Wilkes County.  Although Wilkes was formed in 1777, it was not formally organized with officers until the Spring of 1778.  In 1777 the North Carolina general assemby passed an act confiscating the Earl of Granville's holdings in the then colony, which consisted of the Northwest portion of North Carolina.  Title to these vast lands was taken over by the state in 1778 which then began to issue grants to its' citizens for a nominal fee.

 

Thomas, James and William, either journeyed with William and Alexander Gilbreath to Wilkes County or followed shortly thereafter.  Two years later, in 1780, John and Johanna Gilreath, their sister, migrated from Warren County to Wilkes County. 

 

On December 9, 1778, Thomas filed a claim for land in Wilkes County. Beginning with Thomas' land entry of December 9, 1778, each of the Jones brothers filed a claim to land on Fishing Creek in Wilkes County, 300 acres for Thomas, 200 acres for James and 100 acres for William (Land Entry Book, Wilkes County North Carolina, abstracted by Mrs. W. O. Absher, pp. 34, 36, 49). Each of the brothers' claims adjoined.  On June 22, 1779, Thomas filed an additional entry for 100 acres on Chestnut Mountain near the Old Mill Creek.  The next day, June 23, 1779, he filed for 100 acres on the North Fork of Reddie's River.  Another claim was made January 29, 1780 for 100 acres on both sides of Fishing Creek at James Jones' line.

 

Some members of the Darnall family from Bute County also came out to Wilkes.  John and Isaac Darnall made early claims for land on Fishing Creek near the Jones brothers.  John Darnall died before the turn of the century leaving his wife Rachel.  William Gilbreath, Sr. and his sons, William, Jr. and Alexander were also active in filing for land grants in Wilkes County in the early days of Wilkes County.

 

On October 23, 1782, Thomas Jones received a formal grant from Governor Alexander Martin for 317 acres on Fishing Creek (Wilkes County NC DB B-1, p. 21).  The tract was described as being located on Fishing Creek beginning above the falls and adjoining land of James Jones, William Jones, Senior,  and William Holder (Wilkes Co. NC DB- BI, p. 21).  The deed stated that Thomas was to pay fifty shillings for each one hundred acres.

                                                                      -------------------------------------

Thomas Jones, William and James Jones were members of Captain William Lenoir's company of Wilkes County militia. The names of both Thomas and William appear on a handwritten list found in William Lenoir's desk many years after his death (Excerpts from Vol. IX, No. 3, 1905, Southern History Association, published in the Fall 1985 Bulletin of the Wilkes Co. (NC) Genealogical Society).  William Lenoir stated in one paper that he made lists of the men who served with him so that if he fell in battle the men could prove their services.  Lenoir's list on which the names of Thomas and William Jones appear reads:

 

"William Lenoir, Capt., Nathaniel Gordon, Lt., Charles Crenshaw, Ens., Chapman Gordon, John Parks,     Esqr., Reuben Smithers, WILLIAM JONES, Thomas Newberry, John Pitman, John Horton, Edward Bell,    Devereux Ballard, Charles Hardman, Joel Chandler, John Bain, Benjamin Brown, Elisha Reynolds,         Samuel Johnson, John Vickas, William Tribble, James Shepherd, Samuel Burdone, THOMAS JONES, William Sutton, Wm. Smith... 1 July 1780".

 

This listing of participants may refer to an action of the militia described by William Lenoir in his 1833 application for a Federal pension based on his Revolutionary War service ("The King's Mountain Men", p. 128).

 

    "A short time after this last service Colonel (Benjamin) Cleveland received (late in the afternoon)     intelligence that the Tories were embodying, towards the head of the Yadkin, whereupon he repaired immediately to Wilkes, C. H., distant fourteen miles from his residence where Lenoir with what men        he could collect immediately joined in and by their united exertion succeeded in raising about 200        men, and at daybreak on the following morning had marched to the place where the Tories were said to    be, a distance estimated at 21 miles, but the Tories had fled with great precipitation towards the south.    They promptly pursued them with all possible speed as far as Lincolnton, but did not arrive until after    the celebrated battle at Ramsour's Mills, in which the Tories were triumphantly defeated  (June 20th,    1780). Upon hearing of this event they returned home, absent about one month".

 

Of those on the above list , William Lenoir owned property adjoining Thomas Jones, Nathaniel Gordon was the captain of his tax district and Thomas Newberry was his son-in-law, married to Rebecca Jones.

 

All three Jones brothers were involved in the campaign that led to the 1780 Battle of King's Mountain.  An abstract of Captain William Lenoir's payroll for the expedition to King's Mountain shows the following names and days of service ("Early Settlers of the Reddies River", by Paul

Gregory, p. 43):

 

 

Thomas Jones   14

James Jones     14

William Jones   42

 

In addition, William Jones is on another list of members of Captain William Lenoir's Company at King's Mountain (Peter Thompson Papers, P. C. 1377.1, NC Archives).  James Jones was also in the battle according to one account: (Pat Alderman, "One Heroic Hour at King's Mountain", p. 61).  William and Alexander Gilreath were also in the King's Mountain campaign.

 

Thomas Jones served under Lenoir on at least two other missions. Lenoir's list of members of an expedition to Ramsoners (?), June 17-August 20, 1780, credits Thomas Jones with 3 days service and the mission to the New River, dated November 22, 1780, has Thomas Jones credited for 12 days ("Early Settlers of the Reddies River", by Paul Gregory, p. 44, 46). 

                                                            ----------------------------------------------

Captain Nathaniel Gordon's 1782 tax list for Wilkes County shows Thomas Jones being taxed on 320 acres, 1 horse and 6 head of cattle.  John Gilreath was taxed on 100 acres and 2 head of cattle. Two Darnalls are also listed in this district, Isaac taxed on 300 acres, and Rachel taxed on 500 acres.  They are probably related to the Darnalls of Warren County and came out with either the Jones' or the Gilreaths.

 

Thomas, on April 12, 1783, signed (by mark) the marriage bond of Edward Harris to Catherine Jones (Marriage Bonds Wilkes County NC, County courthouse, p. 110).  This was probably his daughter.  Four months later Edward Harris signed the marriage bond for Thomas Jones' brother William to marry Rachel Backor (Marriage Bonds of Wilkes County, NC, p. 140).

 

Only a bit more than a year after receiving the grant of 317 acres, on November 11, 1783, Thomas Jones, Sr. sold the land, including his home, for 100 pounds to James Reynolds, a neighbor (Wilkes Co., NC DB B-1, p. 6).  The land adjoined his brother James Jones, William Lenoir and William Holder. Thomas signed the deed (with his mark) and it was witnessed by Francis Reynolds, Benjamin Sebastian (by his mark), and Gabriel Smithers.  The deed was not registered in court until April 29, 1789. James Reynolds later sold this tract in November 1799 for $325 to Christine Herd (Wilkes Co. NC WB-D, p. 840).  Whether Thomas left for Georgia at this time is not known.  It is possible that he went back to Franklin County and joined up with brothers Adam and Samuel for the trip to Georgia.

 

It is interesting to note that here and on other official documents for Wilkes County, Thomas is specifically named as "Thomas Jones, Sr.". Typical of the times, this was not to indicate that he had a son named Thomas, Jr. but only a way to show that he was the older of two Thomas Jones' in the community.

 

By the time the 1784 tax list was prepared, Thomas and James had left.  Neither are on the list, although there is a James Jones paying only a poll (Wilkes County NC Tax List 1782-1805, compiled by Absher and Siddon).   And neither Thomas nor James are on the 1787 North Carolina census for Wilkes County.  There are two William Jones on the list, one taxed for 300 acres and one poll in Captain Vannoy's District, corresponding to the amount of land our William received earlier in grants.  William Jones remained in Wilkes County and, apparently, never went to Georgia. By coincidence, the four other Jones brothers ended up in another Wilkes County - but in Georgia.

 

Why, after more than a decade in Wilkes County, North Carolina, the did two Jones brothers decided to move to Georgia?   Perhaps the soil of their farms played out and the allure of cheap, fertile land lured them to the South.   Or, it may have been simply the pull of a new frontier which seemed to be the case in future moves by Thomas and his descendents.

                                         ---------------------------------------------------------

The year 1785 found Thomas, James, Adam and Samuel in frontier Georgia, living in the Long Creek area of Wilkes County, Georgia.  This area of present day Warren County is near the Glascock and Hancock County lines close to the small towns of Jewell and Shoals.

 

Land, tax and other official records for Thomas Jones' early years in Wilkes and Warren County, Georgia show the following:

 

- - -  Thomas Jones appears in the 1785 tax list - the first - for Wilkes County.  Thomas was listed in Captain Ledbetter's district, not owning any land and paying only a poll tax.  Brothers Adam and James were nearby also paying only a poll tax.  Nathan Fowler and Stephen Mitchell, who owned a large amount of land, also lived nearby.

 

- - - One page is missing from the 1786 tax records for Captain Ledbetter's district and Thomas Jones' name is not on the list that remains.  Adam Jones is taxed for a poll,  the only other Jones on the list.

 

- - - By 1787 this tax district has been taken over by Captain Mitchell. Thomas Jones is listed for 40 acres of second grade land and 550 acres of pine, or third grade land.  The 550 acres was probably in Washington County, not Wilkes, as will be seen in the 1790 entry.

 

- - - There are no tax records for Wilkes County for 1788 or 1789.

 

- - - In March 1790 (exact date not listed) Thomas paid 50 pounds to Stephen and Celia Mitchell for an unspecified amount of land on the West side of Long Creek, the document witnessed by Adam Jones, Thomas Rogers, L. Pruitt and Henry Hardin (Warren County GA DB-A, p. 273). Nathan Fowler was an adjacent landowner.

 

- - - Thomas was #73 on the 1790 list for Captain Medlock's district, taxed on 90 acres of second quality land in Wilkes County and 550 acres of third grade land in Washington County.   However, other records show that in 1788 he received 100 acres in Wilkes County under the Georgia headright and bounty land grant system.  Adam Jones, #38 on the list, was taxed on 300 acres of third grade land.  Benjamin Jones is not listed, probably because he was not 21.  John Jones, Benjamin's brother, was #33 and paid only a poll.

 

- - - On October 16, 1790, Thomas Jones and two others presented to the Wilkes Co. Court an inventory of the estate of Benjamin Nicholson, deceased.  Adam Jones and Arthur Fort were executors of the estate. Nicholson, a neighbor in Bute/Warren County, NC, also migrated to Georgia perhaps with the Jones family.

 

- - - Most of the 1791 tax list was destroyed and Thomas is not listed on the remnant.  John Jones paid a poll tax.

 

- - -  In 1792 Thomas Jones was #25 in Captain Medlock's district, taxed on 150 acres of second quality land on Long Creek.  Adam Jones was #23, taxed on 200 acres of piney woods.  Benjamin and John were #30 and #29, respectively, on the 1792 list for a poll only.  Samuel Jones, probably Thomas' brother, appears on the list for the first time, paying only a poll.  Sometime between 1790 and 1792, Thomas disposed of his land in Washington County.

 

- - - On Captain Medlock's 1793 list, Thomas Jones was #78 and paid taxes on 150 acres of oak and hickory. Benjamin and John still did not own any land and paid only a poll. Thomas' land adjoined Reuben Winfrey who had bought 150 acres from Stephen and Celia Mitchell on October 18, 1790 (Wilkes Co. GA DB-A, p. 399).  In December 1793 this part of Wilkes County became part of Warren County.

 

- - - On the 1794 Warren County tax list, Thomas was now in Captain Friend's district and his land was bordered by that of Nathan Fowler and Barnett.  Benjamin and John still paid only a poll.  Rev. Adam Jones' farm was close by.  Other neighbors on Long Creek were Nathan Fowlers' sons Zephaniah and Hillery Fowler and  William Smith who was married to Talitha Fowler.

 

- - - On July 12, 1800, Thomas Jones sold eight acres to Richard Slaughter for $30.  This was part of 50 acres Thomas bought from Stephen Mitchell on March 20, 1790 (Warren County, GA DB-B, p. 234).  This was probably in preparation for moving to Jackson County.  Slaughter sold the same land on March 10,1803 to John Rushing.

 

During the 1780s many Baptist churches were formed in frontier Georgia. One of the earliest was the Long Creek Baptist Church formed in 1786 by Rev. Jepthah Vining following a community meeting held in the home of Nathan Fowler.  Two years later, Nathan Fowler deeded two acres for the construction of the first permanent church structure and gave members permanent access to his spring.

 

The first roster of church members, apparently taken sometime in 1788, shows eleven Jones', eight males and three females (Georgia Dept. of Archives and History, Microcopy AH 181, Box 61, Drawer 21). There were the brothers Thomas, Adam and Samuel; also Benjamin and John, sons of Thomas; and Adam Jones, Jr.  One Thomas Jones, Jr. who was also on the original church roll  may have been another of Thomas' sons.  But it is likely that the "Junior" designation was used to show that he was the youngest of the two Thomas Jones' on the church roll.  Burrell Jones, the eighth male Jones member, was probably a member of the Jones family that migrated from North Carolina but his relationship to Thomas and his brothers is not known.  A Burrell Jones was sued for debt  in Bute County in 1774 (Clerk of Pleas Recording Docket, Bute/Warren County, NC Court 1764-1787, p. 160, N. C. Archives). Charles Darnall, husband of Jane Jones Darnall, was also an original member although Jane does not appear on the church roster.  Perhaps she died before the church was formed. The women were Thomas' wife Mary, "Susanna", Adam's wife and Priscilla Jones.  Other original members with close ties to the Jones family were Nathan Fowler and his son Zephaniah.

 

Reverend Jeptha Vining, whose efforts led to the establishment of the Long Creek Baptist Church, was born February 15, 1736/37 in Sutton, Worcester, Massachusetts and died in Warren County, Georgia in 1797.  He was first married to Amy Miller and then  to Mary Thomas as a second wife.  His grave is in the church yard.

 

The Long Creek Baptist Church is still an active place of worship.  It is a well maintained, brick country church that stands a bit off Georgia Highway 16, between Jewell and Warrenton.  Situated among large old oak trees on a rise, it is some 200 yards east of the spring on Nathan Fowler's land which served the church for so many years.   The church's growth was rapid; by 1788 there were 200 members.  Its' well kept minutes are on microfilm in the Georgia Department of History and Archives and several other repositories. Only the years from 1786 until 1788 are missing.

 

According to local history, over the years two groups, with permission, broke off from the Long Creek church to form separate churches.  First was a church built by a Mr. Jewell, the owner of the cotton mill at what is now the town of Jewell.  Long Creek members who lived in the Jewell area had to cross the Ogeechee River to get to the Long Creek church. Due to flooding, they often couldn't get there.  Although not a religious man, the mill owner, their employer, decided to remedy the problem by building a church of their own.  Two years later, the story goes, the owner got religion and joined the church he had created.

 

The second departure came after the Civil War when some Black members of the Long Creek congregation left to start their own church, now New Salem Baptist Church, several miles away.  It is said that a number of Black members stayed at Long Creek church after the split and some for life.

 

During the Civil War the church at Jewel had a narrow escape from General Sherman's march to the sea. A Union officer, given orders to burn the mill, rode off to carry them out.  On reaching the mill a masonic emblem incorporated in the smokestack caught his eye. Being a Mason himself, he could not bring himself to destroy this symbol of brotherhood.  Instead, he had his troops set fire to bales of cotton stacked outside, creating a splendid column of smoke that could be seen by the far away Union forces as evidence that the entire mill was burning.  Thus the mill was spared .

 

Although Thomas' brother, Adam Jones, was a devout  leader in the Long Creek Baptist Church, Thomas and other members of the Jones family did not take well to the church's strict standards.  The minutes of the church reveal:

 

- - -  July 19, 1789 -  "... The same day it being made to appear that Samuel Jones has been dancing and keeping rude company and using light mindi (?) and disregarding admonition from the church, it was agreed that he should be excommunicated for said crimes."

 

- - -  February 20, 1790 - The church axe fell on three Jones family members this day.  For "..the sin of dancing and keeping rude company", John Jones and Adam Jones, Jr. were excommunicated.  On the same day, "Benjamin Jones was accused of keeping vain company, gave the church no satisfaction for which he was excommunicated."  At least Benjamin was not found guilty of dancing.  After thirteen years on the outside, on June 25, 1803,  Adam Jones, Jr. was readmitted as a member of the church.

 

- - - November 17, 1792 - Thomas Jones was cited Brother Adam Jones for not attending a church conference.  Burrell Jones was cited by William Berry for the same offense.

 

- - - February 16, 1793 - After several warnings, both Thomas and Burrell Jones were excommunicated for not ansering the Church's call for an explananation of their failure to attend the conference.

 

- - - March 13, 1795 -  "Brother Thomas Jones who had been overtaken by drink made an open confession...and was fully restored."

 

- -  - May 14, 1796 - Church members again discussed Thomas' continued use of "liquor" but decided to allow him to remain a member for the time being.

 

- - -  February 18, 1797 - Brother Leadbetter told the conference  that he had been "informed" that Thomas Jones has "behaved disorderly".  The conference asks Nathan Fowler and William West, Thomas' neighbors, to have a talk with him about his conduct.

 

- - - March 18, 1797 - The church conference considered the charge against Thomas but, due to his absence, agreed to wait until the next meeting to take action.  His brother Adam was charged with informing Thomas of the conference's decision to delay.

 

- - -  August 23, 1800 -  It was reported to the conference again that "Brother Thomas Jones is "frequently intoxicated with spiritous liquors".  William Berry and Burrell Evans were charged to talk to him and report back to the conference next month.

 

- - - September 20, 1800 - Brother Berry reported to the church conference that he had talked with Thomas about reports of his misconduct. Thomas, he said,  "acknowledged they were true" but urged the church members to bear with him until the next meeting. The conference agreed to do so.

 

- - - October 25, 1800 - The church took up Thomas' case once more.  By letter he told church members that he could not attend the current meeting and asked that he be "further indulged" until next month's conference.

 

- - - November 22, 1800 - Thomas again failed to show.  The church elders, having reached their limit, voted to excommunicate him for "drunkenness".

 

- - - January 22, 1803 - Thomas made his final appearance before his old church.  This was after his move to Jackson County and only months before his death.  According to the minutes:  "Thomas Jones came forward, made his acknowledgements of his immoral conduct which was satisfactory to the church and he was received into full fellowship and applyed for a letter of Dismission, which was granted."    Following his father's lead, Benjamin Jones also came back to the church for forgiveness on Christmas Eve of that same year. (Taken from Reel 47, Minutes of Long Creek Church, Warren County, GA,, Jack Tarver Library, Mercer University, Macon GA)

 

At this time, tobacco was the main crop in Eastern Georgia but it took a heavy toll on the soil.  For unknown reasons, but perhaps simply due to exhaustion of the soil from growing tobacco, Thomas Jones, his son Benjamin and his neighbor Nathan Fowler left Warren County between 1801 and 1802. They went to red clay country; all of this part of Northeast Georgia is called the "old red hills of Georgia."

 

It appears that Burrell Jones also left at about the same time.  Thomas Jones, his son Benjamin and Nathan Fowler, Benjamin's father-in-law, all appear on the 1802 Jackson County tax list in Captain Sparkes's District . Thomas Jones was taxed by Jackson County on 50 acres located in Hancock County on the waters of Shoulderbone Creek adjoining Louis Monday (Jackson Co., GA Tax Digest 1802, p. 64).  Where he and Mary were living in Jackson County  is not clear.

 

He died sometime before April 26, 1803 as on that date his wife, Mary, was given letters of administration for his estate by the Jackson County Court ("Georgia Intestate Records". Jeannette H. Austin, p. 174).  An inventory of his property, valued at $159.75, was filed with the court on May 6, 1803, signed by Robert Beavers, Isham Holloway, Philip Avery, James Moore and Isaac Browne(?).  Some items on the list were:

 

1 black mare $30, 4 head hogs  $7                       $37.00

1 small shot gun $2, 2 old saddles $3,  (?) $.25      5.25

2 razors, shaving box, cards and (?)                       1.00

1 small heifer $2.50, 1 pot and hooks $4, (?) $6     12.50

1 trunk  $4, 2 bedsteads $3, 5 chairs $1.25              8.25

1 pitcher, glasses and 3 cups $.75, set knives

     and forks $1 1.75

3 stays and 2 shuttles $3, drawing knife, hammer

     and hand saw $2 5.00

1 lot small lumber $4,  lot pewter $4                         8.00

 

Their valuation was a bit high.  Mary Jones, as the administrator, on April 10, 1804 filed with the Jackson Court an account of the sale of her husband's assets showing that sales totaled $142.87 and 1/2 cent. Purchasers were: Mary Jones, Willie Jones, John Jones, Burrell Jones, William Sikes, Frederick Glover, and William Ezzard.

 

Notes for MARY:

After the death of her husband, Mary Jones went through a long drawn-out court proceeding to settle his estate. 

 

- - - On April 26, 1803, Mary Jones was given a letter of administration by the Jackson County court for the estate of her husband, Thomas Jones. Thomas' brother James died only months later (Jackson County GA, Early Court Records, p. 140). 

 

- - - An inventory of his assets, which totaled $159.75, was filed with the court on May 6, 1803. 

 

- - - A year later, April 10, 1804, Mary filed an account of the estate sale with the court showing that it brought in $142.87 and 1/2 cent.

 

- - - On April 23, 1804, following a formal complaint by George Weatherby who must have had an interest in the Thomas Jones estate,  the Jackson County court ordered Mary Jones to give an accounting of her administration of the estate, ".. and particularly to show what disposition has been made with George Weatherbys bond for title to a certain tract of land, whereon she now lives" (op. cit., p. 147).  George Weatherby was a lawyer and was probably involved in the disposition of Thomas Jones' estate. No record has been found of what action the court took on his complaint. 

 

- - - As administrator of Thomas' estate, Mary Jones filed an accounting with the court on February 18, 1806 showing that she had paid out a total of $57.48 and 3/4 cents to five claimants: Isaac Burson, David Dickson, Wright and Keys, George Reed, Jr. and John Jones (GA Archives microfilm drawer 168, roll 35).

 

- - - In the next year, the business establishment of Tennille and Fort brought suit against Mary as administrator of Thomas' estate and on September 27, 1807 a Special Jury found in their favor for $83.89 in damages and $12.12 and 1/2 cents in costs (Superior Court Petitioins, 1807-1809, Jackson Co., GA).  We do not know what this suit was about.

 

It is possible that Mary moved back to Warren County.   On January 26, 1811, the minutes of the Long Creek Baptist Church show that a Mary Jones was "received by experience".  And subsequent church minutes show that a Mary P. Jones died September 8, 1837 (or 1857).  We do not know if this was Mary, the wife of Thomas or Mary, the wife of James Jones.  James' wife was known as "Polly".

 

                   ii.    ANN JONES, b. Abt. 1744, Virginia?; d. Aft. 1823, Franklin County, NC6; m. (1) DAVID YOUNG, Bef. 1762, Granville County, North Carolina; b. Bef. 17387; d. Bef. 1778, Bute County, NC; m. (2) ISAIAH PASCHALL, Aft. May 1778, Bute Co., NC; b. Abt. 1731, Middlesex, NJ8; d. Aft. Dec 09, 1795, Franklin County, NC9.

 

Notes for ANN JONES:

Ann Young was on the 1777 tax list of Captain Bryant Ferrell, assessed for property valued at 247 pounds and 19 shillings (Bute/Warren County Tax List 1777-1780, C. R. X. 281, NC Archives).  She was then on the north side of Ferrell's Road.   Thomas Jones, her brother, is in the same district assessed for 100 pounds.  Next year, in the same district, Ann Young was assessed for 483 pounds and 5 shillings.

 

Married women could not own land in their own name in colonial North Carolina.  Ann Young's husband died sometime before January 28, 1778 for on that date she bought 180 acres of land for 100 pounds from John Huckaby Warren Co., NC DB-6, p. 315).  The land was located on Crooked Creek, a tributary of the Tar River in Southern Bute County, an area that became part of Franklin County when it was formed in the following year.  Ann's sister, Jane Darnall and her husband, Charles Darnall, also moved to this area at about the same time. The deed to Ann Young was witnessed by Jenkins Devaney and Charles Cole. 

 

On May 11, 1778, Ann Young was appointed administrator of the estate of her late husband, David Young.  The security for the bond by Ann Young, who signed with her mark, was made by Charles Darnall, her brother-in-law, and Thomas Jones, her brother, who also signed with his mark.  An inventory of David Young's estate was filed by Ann Young in the May 1778 session of the court for Bute County.  Both Thomas and Adam Jones and Charles Darnall were purchasers at the estate sale for David Young's property.

 

Sometime before the end of 1779, she married the widower Isaiah Paschall, son of William Paschall.  He took her children by David Young into his household and they had four children of their own.

 

In 1807 Ann Paschall is still listed in Ferrell's Tax District in Franklin County, assessed for 170 acres and one poll. She remained on this tax list through 1823.

 

Notes for DAVID YOUNG:

We do not know when David Young came to Granville/Bute County, North Carolina or when he and Ann Jones married.  A deed shows that he was from Rowan County, North Cartolina.

 

- - -   However, he was in Granville as early as March 7, 1758 when he bought 192 acres from John and Mary Hawkins for 21 pounds.  This land was located on Hawtree Creek adjoining Dansby's line.  The deed was witnessed by William Bullock and William Paschall (Granville Co. NC DB-C, p. 439).  William Paschall was the father of Isaiah Paschall who later married David's Young's widow, Ann.

 

- - - The 1762 list of tithables for Granville County shows Thomas Jones living in the household of David Young, his brother-in-law, who was married to Ann Jones (NC Archives, C. R. 044.701.20, 1762-1763 Tax List).

 

- - - On September 29, 1764, David Young and his wife Ann sold to John Jones of New Kent County, Virginia 192 acres for 150 Virginia pounds (Bute County, NC DB-A, p. 88).  He and his family then lived on this land which, the deed states, he bought from George Tillman.  It was located on the east side of Hawtree Creek adjoining "The Old Trading Path."  The deed was witnessed by Thomas Jones (David's brother-in-law), Godfree Jones, Joshua Gray and William Archer.  It was acknowledged at the January 1765 term of the Bute County court. 

 

- - - Seven months later, on April 12, 1765, John Jones conveyed the same land to his son Godfree Jones (Bute Co., NC DB-A, p. 163).  But John Jones continued to live there.

 

- - - Then four months after that transfer, on August 5, 1765, Godfree Jones sold the land back to David Young "of Rowan County" for 150 pounds Virginia money, the same amount for which David Young had sold it to Godfree's father (Bute Co. NC DB-1, p. 362). The deed was witnessed by Adam Jones, William Pattishall and David King and proved by William Pattishall in the April 1767 term of the Bute County Court.  It is not clear what was involved in this series of transactions.  At that time, Rowan County encompassed most of the Western part of North Carolina, including what is now Wilkes County where a number of Jones brother settled in the late 1770s.

 

- - - David Young made another purchase of land, recorded in Bute County court in December 1766, for 150 acres that he bought from Isaac Bryant of Cumberland County, Virginia for 11 pounds "Virginia money" (Bute Co., NC DB-1, p. 252).  It was located at a fork of Fowler's Branch, to a line between Daniel's Ford and William Ellis.  The deed was witnessed by Thomas Jones, Elizabeth Jones and Jeane (Jane?) Jones.  It was proved by Thomas Jones in the January 1767 session of court and registered on April 9, 1767.  A marginal note states that on August 14, 1771: "Del'd. to David Young."

 

- - - On July 29, 1766, Elizabeth Young, David Young and John Hicks made bond as administrators for the estate of James Young, David's father and Elizabeth's deceased husband.  At the estate sale for his father, on September 27, 1766, David Young bought a basin dish and 4 plates; a great coat; a coat and jacket; 1 pair of shoes and stockings; a table; a deerskin; razor and mug and one jug "full of brandy" (Bute County NC Record Book 1 - 1764-1767, p. 31).

 

David Young, Richard Jones, and William Gilreath, Sr. and Jr. bought items from Samuel Croxton's estate sale; David a cart for one pound, five shillings (Warren Co., NC WB-A, p. 25).

 

In 1770, David Young and William Hansill were processioners for St. John's Parish for the land lying:  "From the trading road to the country (county) line and from that up Smith's Creek to the mouth of Malone Mill's Creek and thence up Malone Mill's Creek to the road and so to the beginning.."  This precinct contained the lands of John Jones and his son Benjamin, Charles Darnall and David Young.

                                                  

The 1777-1778 tax list for the Hawtree District lists David Young as being taxed "for his land" valued at 270 pounds. By the time the 1777 tax list for that area was prepared, his widow, Ann, had moved south to the Crooked Creek area, a tributary of the Tar River.  She is on the 1777 list of Captain Bryant Ferrell assessed for 247 pounds.

 

On January 28, 1778, Ann Young, his widow, bought 180 acres on the Crooked Creek from John Huckaby for 100 pounds (Warren Co., NC DB-6, p. 315).  Crooked Creek was a tributary of the Tar River in the southern part of Bute County that in 1779 became Franklin County.  The deed was witnessed by Jenkins De1vaney and Charles Cole and acknowledged in the January term of court by Huckaby.

 

David Young's wife, Ann, was the administratrix of his estate.  An account of the sale of David Young's estate was filed by Sheriff Henry Hill in the August 1778 court.   At the sale purchases were made by Mrs. Ann Young, brothers-in-law Thomas Jones, Adam Jones and Charles Darnall, Samuel Williams, James Young, James Merony, Jeremiah Perry, Jesse Rowland, John Bridges, Burrell Perry, Wm. Cook and Henry Hill (Bute Co., NC Records Book 2, p. 208).  The sale proceeds totaled 450 pounds, 7 shillings and 6 pence (Estate of David Young, C. R. 015.508.2, NC Archives).   

 

Notes for ISAIAH PASCHALL:

Isaiah Paschall was the son of William Paschall who, before the Revolution, sired a large family in the Hawtree and Smith's Creek area of Granville/Bute County, North Carolina. 

 

His first wedding was to Margaret Nichols, daughter of William Nichols.  The 1762 Granville tax list shows him living in the household of Julius Nichols, his brother-in-law, as overseer.  During the early years of the Revolution he served in the militia for the Nutbush District.  But in 1779 he was excused from further military service for reasons of health.

 

By the end of 1779, Margaret Paschall had died and he was living on Crooked Creek in Franklin County married to Ann Young, the widow of David Young and daughter of Benjamin and Johannah Jones (Franklin Co., NC DB A, p. 24).  He took the Young children into his household and he and Ann had  four of their own.  Four of his wife's siblings lived nearby; Thomas Jones, Adam Jones, Susannah Jones and Jane Darnall. 

 

Crooked Creek rises in southwest Franklin County and flows first southeast and then northeast into the Tar River.  On a current map, the creek begins just to the southeast of Youngsville, flows southeast across Highway 401, turns south just before Highway 39 and parallels it until crossing the highway south of Bunn.  It then turns east and north, crosses Old Bunn Road and then Highway 98 before joining the Tar River near Sledge Road just southwest of Lake Royale.

 

On August 3, 1779, Isaiah and Ann Paschall sold a tract of 180 acres to James Young, Ann's deceased husband's brother, for 100 pounds.  The land was described as lying on the south bank of Crooked Creek, a tributary of the Tar River, adjoining Ferrell and John Young.  The deed was witnessed by Adam Jones,  Ann Paschall's brother, and Demetrius Young, her son.  It provided that Isaiah and Ann Paschall reserved use of the land for themselves as long as either shall live (Joseph W. Watson, "Abstracts of Early Deeds of Franklin County NC 1779-1797", p. 4). 

 

Four years later, on September 3, 1783, James Young sold Isaiah Paschall what appears to be the same tract,  170 acres on the South side of Crooked Creek for 100 pounds (Franklin Co., NC DB-4, p. 76).  The deed was witnessed as before by Demetrius Young and Adam Jones. 

 

Seven months later, on April 17, 1784, Isaiah Paschall bought 160 acres in a fork of Crooked Creek adjoining Crane and Jeen, for 50 pounds from Francis Jones.  The deed was witnessed by James Young and Luke E. Price (Franklin Co., NC B-4, p. 63).

 

The December 1786 court for Franklin County ordered Isaiah Paschall, Joseph Wright, Samuel Jones and others to lay out a road from Lewisburg to join a new road leading to the county line to Roger's Ferry on the "Nuse" (Neuse) River (Franklin Co. NC Court Minutes, Vol. I, abs. by Stepehn E. Bradley, Jr., p. 36).

 

The 1790 census for the Halifax District of Franklin County, North Carolina shows Isaiah Paschall with a household consisting of 1 male over 16, 3 males less than 16 and 5 females of all ages.

 

On February 22, 1791, Isaiah Paschall sold to James Young for 40 pounds a tract of 160 acres lying on the south fork of Crooked Creek adjoining Mary Young and Bridgers (Franklin County, NC DB-10, p. 1398)..  The deed was witnessed by Thomas Arendell and James arendell.  This appears to be the land he bought in 1784 from Francis Jones.

 

Isaiah Paschall made his will on December 9, 1795 witnessed by James Young and Mary Young (Franklin Co., NC WB-A, p. 169). Since his sons by Ann were not of age, Isaiah made Demetrius Young and Stephen Young, his step-sons, executors of his will.  In his will he left to his son William twenty shillings; to son George a feather bed and furniture; to his step-daughter Ann Young a feather bed, furniture and a cow and calf; to his step-daughter Sarah Young a feather bed, furniture and a cow and calf; and the remainder of his estate to his wife Ann for her lifetime use.  After her death the remaining estate was to be sold and the proceeds split between his and wife Ann's four children, Isaiah, John, Dennis and Lucinda.

 

                  iii.    CATHERINE JONES, b. Abt. 1748, Caller's Ordinary, Smith Creek, Granville County, NC?; d. Bef. Feb 11, 1787, Warren County, NC10; m. WILLIAM NOLES, Bef. 1776, Bute County, NC11; b. 1742, Jordan Creek,Granville/Bute County, NC12; d. Bef. Oct 28, 1794, Warren County, NC13.

 

Notes for CATHERINE JONES:

According to a Noles family researcher, Catherine Jones was born in 1748 at Collier's (sometimes called Coler's or Caller's) Ordinary, the first of a series of inns located where the village of Ridgeway in Warren County is today.  It was then in Granville County. The 1748 date is questionable, however.   Robert Collier did not receive a license from Granville county to operate an ordinary until September 5, 1750 ("History and Genealogies of Old Granville County, North Carolina, 1746-1800", Thomas M. Owen, p. 182).  He also operated a grist mill on Smith's Creek where John Jones owned land on the other side (op. cit., p. 159).  The ordinary remained in business for some time; "Colers Ord." appears on Collet's 1770 map.  By 1816, the community was called Paschalls, named after John Paschall's tavern.  Ridgeway is now in the Smith Creek Township.

 

Ordinaries were closely regulated by the counties in colonial times.  Each year the Granville/Bute court would set the maximum prices that inn keepers could charge.  Some of the prices set for 1752, for example, were:

 

Gallon of West India rum          10 shillings,   8   pence

Gallon of New England rum        5     "         ,  4     "

Gallon Countrymade Brandy      5     "         ,  4     "

Quart of Madiera wine               3     "         ,  4    "

Quart of Country Cider                                  4    "

Lodging per night on good

     bed and clean sheets                              4     "

Hot dinner with good wheat

   bread and small beer or cider  1  "       ,     4    "

         

 

Notes for WILLIAM NOLES:

In his will, made on June 15, 1776, Benjamin Jones leaves one shilling to each of his named daughters, including "Cathron Noles". 

 

Edward Knowls will spelled the name "Knowls" (Will dated Nov. 2, 1764, probated April 1765, Bute Co., NC).  But most official records of Bute County use the "Noles" spelling for records about Edward's children.

 

- - - William Noles and his brother Lawrence each inherited a one-half interest in their father's grist mill when he died in early 1765 .  The will also divided his land between them upon the death of their mother. Seven years later, on January 2, 1772, Lawrence Noles sold his interest in the 50 acres where William then lived and his share of the grist mill to William for 20 pounds (Bute County, NC DB-3, p. 380).

 

- - - The 1766 list of inhabitants of the Crossroads District, taken by Benjamin Person, show a "William Knowls and brother Larrance" living together.

 

- - - The 1771 list of Bute taxables show William Knowls and Lawrence Knowls listed separately.

 

- - - The 1778 taxables in the western part of Captain John Colclough's district show Lawrence Noles with taxable property of 20 pounds and Martha "Noles", widow of Edward, with property worth 253 pounds.  William Noles (Knowls) is not listed and is probably living with his mother.  Colclough's district is the one where Benjamin Jones' lived.

 

- - - Both William and Lawrence Knoles in 1778 signed the oath of allegiance to the State of North Carolina and vowed opposition to King George III.  This enabled them to vote in local elections.  In that year they both also signed a petition to the North Carolina General Assembly to split Bute County into two counties to which the Assembly gave it's approval in 1779.

 

- - - The 1779 tax list for the newly named Warren County shows William Noles with property valued at 395 pounds. 

 

- - - Capt. Colclough's tax list for 1781 shows William Noles" with 576 pounds in taxable property.

 

- - - The list for the same district in 1783 shows William Noles with 82 pounds in taxable property.

 

- - - Brother Lawrence Noles was on the May 1783 list of insolvents filed in the Warren County court showing those who did not pay their 1782 taxes.

 

- - - In 1784, Colclough lists William Knoles with 100 acres and 1 "FP" -  poll.

 

- - - The "State Census for North Carolina 1784-1787" list William and his brother Lawrence as Noles in Captain John Colclough's District in Warren County.  For William's household there was one white male 21-60 ( William); four white males under 21or over 60; three white females and three Blacks.  Lawrence's household has 1 white male 21-60 (Lawrence); 2 white males under 21 or over 60 and three white females ("State Census of North Carolina 1784-1787", transcribed by Mrs. Alvaretta K. Register, p. 164). 

 

- - - On April 27, 1785, William Knoles, Wm. Balthrop and Aaron Shearin were appointed "patrollers"  in Captain Shearin's District (Warren County NC Minutes of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, p. 80).

 

- - - Also in 1785, he was a purchaser at the sale of the estate of Samuel Bell, deceased (Warren Co., NC DB-4, p. 127).  Later that year he was a buyer at the estate sale of William Murphy (op. cit., p. 160).

 

- - - He took on an apprentice in 1788, taking in William Lambert Norris, age 10, the bastard son of Nancey Lambert.  The August 1788 Warren court bound him to William "Knowles" to teach him to read and write and become a "planter"("Records of Estate Warren County North Carolina, Vol I", David B. Gammon, p. 95).

 

- - - On July 5, 1788, he bought items at another estate sale, this for John Todd (Warren Co., NC WBF-5, p. 33).

 

- - - The 1790 census for Warren County, NC shows the household of William Knowles with 2 males over 16, 3 males less than 16 and 4 white females.  In that year he is on the tax list for the Six Pound District of Warren County with 175 Acres, 1 FP (free poll) and 1 BP (black poll).

 

- -  - On May 29, 1790, John Milam sold William Noles 15 2/3 acres for 11 pounds and 5 shillings.  The land was located on the East side of the road leading to Black's Ferry to Col. Hawkins line, William Noles own line and to James Melone's line (Warren Co. NC DB-12, p. 127).

 

- - - He added another acre to his holding on June 1, 1791 when he bought land from Robert White for 5 pounds (Warren Co. NC DB-12, p. 199).  This was on Six Pound Creek adjoining Hawkins line.

 

- - - The next year, on August 29, 1792, the Warren court appointed William Knoles, John Shearin and Robert White as patrollers in Captain White's District.

 

- - - His liking for estate sales was evidenced again in December 1794 when he was a buyer at the estate sale for Benjamin Kimball, for which a report was filed in the February 1795 term of court (Warren Co., NC WB-8, p. 32).  Shortly thereafter, both he and his brother Laurence were buyers at the estate sale for John Moseley, held on January 19 and 20 and March 14 and 16, 1795 (Warren Co. NC WB-8, p. 81).  In view of the fact that William Noles died before the dates of these sales, there is an element of mystery here.  The likely explanation is that William bought items from the Kimball and Moseley families before the dates of the formal estate sales - and before his own death.

                                                   ---------------------------------------------------------

 

Catherine Noles died sometime before February 11, 1787, the date William Noles drew up his will.   She is not mentioned in the will, nor are any children listed for them.   This seems strange in view of the under age children in William's household in the 1790 census.   In the will he left Pattey Short and her children the land where she lived as far as the Mill creek.  To his brother Lawrence, he left livestock for his lifetime with reversion to his children.  He left a "young sorrel horse" to George Read.  To John, William, Edward and Salley Tansell, he gave a cow and calf each.  He gave his mother a life estate in the remainder of his land which, at her death, was to revert to his sister "Suckey Noles" for her lifetime.  When "Suckey" died the land was to be divided between her two children, Butler and Corbin.  The will was witnessed by James and Jesse Moseley and Lawrence Noles, by his mark.  The executors were John and Jesse Moseley.

 

William Noles died sometime before October 28, 1794 when an inventory of his estate was taken by Jesse Moseley.  It showed that he owned one negro named "Jack", 2 beds, furniture, a parcel of feather, 6 chairs, 2 tables, 1 chest, 1 water wheel, 3 pair cards, miscellaneous household and farm implements, 4 horses, 1 saddle and bridle, 16 cows, 63 hogs, 16 geese and other items (Warren Co. NC WB-7, p. 219).

 

His will was proved in the November 1794 term of court (Warren County WB-7, pp.242-243).  However, there was controversy over it.  On November 24, 1794, the Warren County court minutes show that      "Brittian Knoles, by A.S., his attorney", challenged the validity of William "Knoles" will as offered for probate by the deceased's brother, Lawrence (Warren County, NC Minutes to the Court of Pleas and Quarter  Sessions, Vol. III", Ginger L. Christmas, p. 69).  To decide the question, the court asked that a jury be summoned.  Perhaps, the minutes have the challenger's name wrong because four days later the minutes for November 28 read:

 

     "Lawrence Knoles against Butler Knoles - On a will said to be Will of William Knoles, deceased, Jury sworn who upon their oaths do say that the Writing said to be the Will of said William Knoles, deceased, is the proper Will of the said Knoles, the same was proved by the oaths of James Moseley and Jesse Moseley and the same is ordered to be recorded" (op. cit., p. 74).

 

Why Butler Noles questioned his uncle William's will is not known.

 

On that same day, Jesse Moseley filed an inventory of William Noles' estate with the court (op. cit., p. 75).

 

                  iv.    ELIZABETH JONES, b. Abt. 1749, Granville Co., NC; m. BEARD, Aft. Dec 176614.

                   v.    JANE JONES, b. Abt. 1750, Granville Co., NC; m. CHARLES DARNALL, Bef. 1767, Bute Co., NC15; d. Aft. Feb 27, 1802, Georgia?16.

 

Notes for JANE JONES:

Jane Jones was a witness at the trial of Charles Darnall against the administrator of the estate of Samuel Croxton (Bute Co., NC Records Book 2, p. 20).

 

Notes for CHARLES DARNALL:

In records there are various spellings for Charles Darnall's name.  For uniformity, I have arbritrarily chosen this spelling.

 

Charles Darnall and his wife, Jane, were not unknown in the Bute County court.  In 1767 they brought suit against the estate of Samuel Croxton and won a jury verdict against Robert Turnbull, the estate administrator, for seven pounds (Bute Co. NC Court Minutes, p. 19).  However, Turnbull was granted a new trial.  On May 13, 1768, upon reconsideration, the jury reduced the verdict for the Darnalls by 40 shillings, bringing the award to 5 pounds and court costs (Ibid).  Benjamin Jones, who had purchased land from Croxton in 1765, was among those who testified in Darnall's behalf.  Others who testified were John Jones, Samuel Bell, George Walker, Jesse Ellis, Jane Jones (Darnall's wife), David Young (his brother-in-law) and William Shearin.

 

On August 14, 1772, Darnall was sued by John Gilreath who was later to administer the estate of Benjamin Jones, his wife's father.  We do not know the cause or the outcome.  In the February 1773 term of court, Darnall was sued by an Edward Tyler.  Another suite was filed the same term against him and a George Read.  Both suits were dismissed by the court in the February 1775 term.

 

William and Elizabeth Ellis, on February 9, 1770, sold to Charles Darnall, for 15 pounds Virginia money, 150 acres that Ellis had bought from Daniel Ford.  Ford had bought the tract on February 16, 1765 from Sherrod Hawood for 15 pounds with the deed  witnessed by Adam Jones, William Archer and Jeremiah Ellis. The tract Darnall bought was described as being "from a Great Path in Poalcat Bottom north to the Virginia line, waters of Ronoke and Jeffries Branch" (Bute County, NC DB-3, p. 2).  The deed was witnessed by Isaac and William Acree and proved in the February 1770 term of court.   The 1771 list of taxables for Thomas Eaton's district, south of the Roanoke River, shows Charles Darnall in the household of Isaac Acree the local constable (Thomas Eaton's List, Pittman Papers, P. C. 123.9, Bute County Taxables, NC Archives).  Richard, Samuel and James Jones are in the same district.  It should be noted that in 1751 a William Acree was a processioner in Precinct 13 of Hanover County, Virginia, the precinct where the Jones brothers probably lived before migrating to North Carolina in the 1740s.

 

On August 24, 1772, Charles Darnall mortgaged the 150 acres, livestock and household goods to secure a debt of 49 pounds owed to James Ronaldson and Company of Bute County (Bute Co., NC DB-4, p. 144). This deed was witnessed by Isaac Acree and Thomas Miller, Jr.  

 

Sometime before May 1777, Charles Darnall moved south to settle on a tributary of the Tar River, an area which in 1779 became part of the newly formed Franklin County.  Several other members of Benjamin Jones' family; Thomas Jones, Adam Jones,  Ann Young and Susannah Jones settled in this area during this period.

 

Charles Darnall and Jeremiah Perry, one of the many Perrys in this area, were witnesses in May 1777 to a deed from Daniel Potter to another Jeremiah Perry (Bute County DB-6, p. 152).  The deed was proven by Charles Darnall at the May 1777 term of the Bute County court.

 

On May 10, 1777, Joseph Wright sold 100 acres to Charles Darnall for 50 pounds plus payment of quit rents (Bute County, NC DB-6, p. 154).  The land was in Bute County described as from the Mill Stone Branch and down the Great Branch adjoining Jeremiah Perry.  It was witnessed by Daniel Potter and Jeremiah Perry and proved in the May 1777 court by Jeremiah Perry.

 

On May 12, 1778 after moving to the Tar river area, Charles Darnall sold for 80 pounds the 150 acre tract located near the Roanoke River to Hardaway Davis of Mecklenburg County, Virginia (Bute County DB-6, p. 417).  The deed was witnessed by John Moseley and Archibald Sledge. Darnall acknowledged it in the May 1778 court and it was registered on January 5, 1780.   

 

On May 11, 1778 he made a land entry on 640 acres on the south side of Cedar Creek, a tributary of the Tar River, on Porter's Branch, Joseph Wright's corner, including two improvements.  Two years earlier, a Joseph Wright was a witness to Benjamin Jones' will ("Bute County, NC Land Grant Plats and Land Entries", comp. by Brent Holcomb, p. 98).   On February 12, 1779, Charles Darnall was issued grant #55 by the State of North Carolina for 592 acres on Cedar Creek adjoining Roland, Jeffreys and Perry ("Abstracts of Early Deeds of Franklin County North Carolina 1779-1997" by Joseph W. Watson, p. 30). 

 

On March 20, 1780, he sold 297 acres of his land for 147 pounds and ten shillings to William Cook.  The tract was described as being on the south side of Cedar Creek near the head of the Great Branch, beginning at the dividing line between Joseph Bridges and James Jones and on his own line (Op. Cit., p. 18).  It was witnessed by William Bridges and William Trulove who had a close relationship with Susannah Jones, another daughter of Benjamin and Johannah Jones.

 

Sales records for the estate of David Young, his deceased brother-in-law, filed in the August 1778 term of the Bute County court show that he, along with brothers-in-law Thomas and Adam Jones, were purchasers at the sale (Bute Co., NC Records Book 2, p. 208).

 

Franklin county records show that for the next decade Charles Darnall was active in local affairs.

He was a key figure in the development of roads in this part of Franklin county, helping to lay out the route for new roads and maintaining them after they were built.  The Franklin County court in December 1785 appointed Charles Darnall overseer of the road from Partridge to Cedar Creek in place of James Perry (Franklin County Court Minutes 1785-1793, Vol. I, abstracted by Stephen E. Bradlkey, Jr., p. 4).   In December 1786, the court ordered five men to help Darnall in building "the causeway at Cedar Creek (Op. Cit., p. 37).  A year later, the September 1787 court ordered Darnall and others, including Joseph Wright, to lay out a new road near William Jeffreys to Lewisburg (Op. Cit., p. 56).    An entry in the December 1787 court minutes appears to report the same order, that a list of men including Darnall, James Young, Joseph Wright, Isaiah Paschall and Jeremiah Perry lay out a new road from Lewisburg to the new road at the Wake County line near William Jeffreys (Op. Cit., p. 64).  He was replaced as road overseer by James Baker by the December 1788 court (Op. Cit., p. 89).  Darnall and Charles Cole were ordered by the September 1798 session of court to work a road under William Truelove (Op. Cit., p. 110).                                              

A deed of trust dated November 6, 1790 shows that Charles Darnall mortgaged a 390 acre (actually 300 acres) tract on which he lived to Jeremiah Perry for 187 Spanish milled dollars (Franklin Co., NC DB-7, p. 110).  Jeremiah Perry was probably an uncle to Jane Darnall, a brother of her deceased mother, Johannah Jones. The deed stated that this was all the land Darnall owned in Franklin County and that it adjoined the lands of William Cook, Edward Freeman, William Truelove, John Perry and Jeremiah Perry.  On December 17, 1791, Darnall relinquished title to Jeremiah Perry for 120 pounds Virginia money (Op. Cit., p. 190).  It is not clear if this was in addition to the money received from the above mortgage.  The land was described as lying on Cedar Creek adjoining the properties of Jeremiah Perry, William Truelove, Cook, Freeman, and John Perry and the deed was witnessed by William Cook and Amos Bridges.  It is interesting to note that in 1804 Bridges signed an affadavit in support of a petition by the heirs of Adam Jones for a Virginia Revoultionary War land grant. 

 

It appears that this deed marked the end of Charles Darnall's stay in North Carolina.  We do not know when he left for Georgia but there are no Darnalls in the 1790 census for Franklin County.  The June 1792  session of the Franklin County court allowed Rubin Ransom, the tax collector for Darnall's district, to  count Darnall as an insolvent, listing him as owning 300 acres and owing for one poll (Franklin County, NC Court Minutes 1785-1793, Vol. I, abstracted by Stephen E. Bradley, Jr., p. 71).  But by this time he had already disposed of his land and gone to Georgia, probably with other members of the Jones family. 

 

In Wilkes County, Georgia along with a number of Jones', he was an early member of the Long Creek Baptist Church and his name appears on the church's first membership roster.  Sometime in 1793 he bought 125 acres on Rocky Comfort Creek for 45 pounds from John and Mary Taliaferro (Warren Co. GA DB-B, p. 370-371).  In 1794, he is listed in Captain Neal's district, for 1 poll and 125 acres adjoining Neal and Jones.  The Jones was probably Joshua Jones, relationship unknown, who on November 3, 1797 sold land adjoining Darnall to John Myrick (Warren Co. GA DB-A, p. 426).  Rocky Comfort Creek lies to the East of Long Creek where Thomas, Adam and James Jones settled.   Charles Darnall sold 160 acres on Rocky Comfort Creek to Henry Kendall on December 16, 1803 (Warren County GA DB-B, p. 581).

 

Along with some of his Jones kinfolk, he, too, ran afoul of the strictures of the Long Creek Church.  At the church's monthly conference on February 27, 1802, the minutes show that he acknowledged his misdeeds and his confession was deemed  satisfactory. 

 

                  vi.    JOHANNAH JONES, b. Abt. 1750, Granville Co., NC; d. Aft. Oct 18, 1817, Whitley County, KY17; m. JOHN GILREATH18, Abt. 1771, Bute County, NC; b. Abt. 1751, Granville County, NC19; d. Aft. Dec 19, 1802, Wilkes County, North Carolina.

 

Notes for JOHANNAH JONES:

Johannah Jones Gilreath was one of seven daughters of Benjamin and Johannah Jones.  Although she is not named in her father's will and the other six daughters are, his will gives Johannah Gilreath's  husband, John, full control over Benjamin's land on behalf of his widow, Johannah Jones.  John Gilreath was also a legatee under the will (Bute Co., NC Record Book 2, p. 122) receiving one-third of Benjamin's personal property. 

 

In 1780, Johannah Gilreath went with John and her children to settle in Wilkes County, North Carolina.  There John Gilreath joined his father and two brothers who had migrated to Wilkes in 1778.  John Gilreath died in about 1802-1803.

 

In 1805, Johannah Gilreath is in Captain Roseau's tax district, taxed on 140 acres ("Wilkes County, North Carolina Tax List 1782-1805" compiled by Absher and Sidden).  On February 6,  1806 she signed an apprentice bond for her daughter Sarah Dougherty's son, John.  John was bound until he was 21 to Johannah to "learn the occupation of farmer" (Wilkes Co., NC WB-2, p. 168)  A few months later, on May 9, 1806, she took on another apprentice, Usley Robert, "to learn the occupation of spinster" until she was 18 years of age (op. cit., p. 179).   It is likely that Usley Robert was the orphaned child of one of Johannah's daughters, perhaps another Johannah, who does not appear in known records.  Under traditional naming practices, John and Johannah's first born daughter should also have been named Johannah.  Usley Robert's name may have a connection with the naming of Johannah's daughter Susannah Jacoway's son as " William Ussery Jacoway. "

 

The 1810 census for Wilkes County, N. C. lists Johannah  as head of a household of three females; (1) age 45 and over, (1) one age 26 to 45 and (1) age 10 to 16.  There were four males; (1) age 16 to 26, (2) age 10 to 16 and (1) age 0 to 10.

 

A deed signed by her livimg children on October 18, 1817 sold 106 acres to a John Saint Clair including the "tract of land where Johanna Gilreath now lives" (Wilkes Co., NC DB-L, p. 273).  This probably marked her departure to Whitley County, Kentucky to join her children who had moved there.  The 1820 census for Whitley County shows son Gideon Gilreath's household with two older women, probably Johannah and his sister Nancy.

 

Notes for JOHN GILREATH:

John Gilreath was the oldest of five sons of William Gilreath.  His names was first found in Bute County, NC records as a witness on a deed made in April 1767.  In 1771, his name is on the  Bute County, North Carolina tax list of John Hawkins, living apart from his father but in the same district as Benjamin Jones.  

 

In 1778, John and his brother, William, refused to sign a loyalty oath in support of North Carolina and against King George III.   However, William and two of his brothers, Alexander and James, served in William Lenoir's Wilkes County militia during the Revolution. Why John and William refused to sign the oath is a mystery, especially in view of the fact that their father had been active in attending meetings of the Bute County Committee on Safety.  In that same year, John Gilreath, his father William and his brother James signed a petition to divide Bute County into what became Warren and Franklin counties.  The Carolina legislature approved and, in 1779, the part of Bute County where the Gilreaths lived became Warren County.

 

After his marriage to Johannah Jones in about 1771, it appears that they lived on the farm belonging to her father and mother.  In his will, made in 1776, Benjamin Jones left John Gilreath in full possession of his farm, for his widow's behalf, and gave John a one-third share of his personal property.    

 

Although there is not a clear picture of what happened to Benjamin Jones' land after his death, tax records reveal the following:

 

     - - - Benjamin Jones' property was assessed for 212 pounds on the 1777 Hawtree Creek tax list ("List of Taxables Bute County 1777-1778", p 13, NC Archives).  Samuel Jones is not on the list, probably underage, and John Gilreath is taxed for a poll only.

 

     - - - Samuel Jones appears on the 1778 Bute County tax list in Captain John Colclough's District with  taxable property valued at 390 pounds (op. cit., p. 41).  John Gilreath is in the same district taxed on property of 36 pounds, 9 shillings and 1/2 pence.  So it appears that Samuel is being taxed on the land and property that belonged to his father who died in the preceeding year.

                                                       

     - - - Samuel is not on the 1779 tax list for the Smith's Creek and Hawtree Creek District but John Gilreath's taxable property in that district has increased from 36 pounds to 507 pounds.  It seems that John Gilreath is now being taxed for Benjamin Jones' estate.

 

Apparently, some of Benjamin's property was disbursed to his heirs over the next year in preparation for John Gilreath's journey west to Wilkes County, North Carolina because in 1780 John Gilreath was assessed for only 102 pounds.

                                                              

Wilkes County, NC records show that on March 23, 1780 John Gilreath claimed 50 acres adjoining the land of Thomas Hamrick.  However in 1781, he was on Captain John Colclough's tax list in Warren County for 126 pounds and 8 shillings but was also on a "list of insolvents mistakes to be allowed" indicating that he was no longer in Warren County.  In moving his family to Wilkes County, he was following in the footsteps of his father, brothers Alexander and William and three of his brothers-in-law, Thomas, William and James Jones.   

 

By 1782, John is in Captain Nathaniel Gordon's Tax District of Wilkes County, listed as owning 100 acres and two head of cattle.   Thomas Jones (Sr.) is also in this district.  William Gilreath, Sr. and his other two sons, William, Jr. and Alexander are in Capt. Abraham Demoss' district. The 1787 North Carolina census for Wilkes County, Captain Trible's District, taken by James Fletcher, lists the John Gilreath household with one male 21-60, 3 males under 21 and 4 females.  He was taxed on 150 acres of land.

 

John Gilreath was appointed constable in Captain Gordon's District in 1793, replacing his brother Alexander, a position he held until he resigned on May 2, 1797. 

 

The 1800 census for John Gilreath's household shows one male less than ten, two less than sixteen,, one over forty five and one female less than sixteen and one over 45.  He remained in Wilkes County until his death in 1802.  Although John Gilreath received land grants in Wilkes County ranging from 50 to 100 acres during the 1780s, the land his family seemed to have retained after his death was a tract of 106 acres purchased on May 7, 1794 (Wilkes County NC DB B-1, p. 407-408).  This land, bought at a court ordered land sale, was located on both sides of Little Cub Creek, probably near his father who lived on a fork of the same creek.  The deed was proved on the oath of Hillair Roussau who in 1805 was the Captain of the tax district where Johannnah Gilreath resided.  Later, one of the Gilreaths would name a son Hillair.

 

John and Johannah  had three daughters and four sons.  His will, made on December 19, 1802, was proved in the January 1803 term of the Wilkes County court.  Under it, he left his entire estate to his wife, Johannah, for her lifetime or widowhood.  His property was then to be divided among his children except for daughter Sarah Dorety (Dougherty) who was given five shillings (Wilkes Co., NC WB-2, p. 83).  What Sarah did to incurr this treatment is unknown.  The executors of his will were Johannah Gilreath and his brother, William Gilreath.  Witnesses were Gabriel Souther and Henry Bryan.

 

Later, the other children are named in a 1817 deed from the heirs and legatees of John Gilreath to John Saint Clair (Wilkes County, NC DB- L, p. 275).  They were: Nancy Gilreath, William Gilreath, Archibald Jacoway, Susanna Gilreath Jacoway, Benjamin Gilreath, Jesse Gilreath and Gideon Gilreath.  His widow, Johannah, must have still been living because the deed refers to the land as that "whereon Johannah Gilreath now lives."  By the time this land was sold, John's daughter Susannah Jacoway and sons Benjamin and William are living in Whitley County, Kentucky.  Later they were joined there by Nancy and Gideon.  For reasons unknown, the deed from the children to John Saint Clair was not recorded until October 3, 1826.

 

 

 

                 vii.    SARAHAM JONES, b. Aft. 1750, Granville Co., NC.

                viii.    SUSANNAH JONES20, b. Aft. 1750, Granville County, NC; d. Franklin County, NC; m. (1) ADAM JONES21, Bute County,; b. Bef. 1743, Hanover/ New Kent County, VA ?22; d. Bef. Dec 1791, Franklin County, NC23; m. (2) WILLIAM TRUELOVE, Bef. 1791, Franklin County, NC; d. Bef. Oct 1821, Franklin County, NC?24.

 

Notes for SUSANNAH JONES:

It appears that Susannah Jones married her cousin, Adam Jones, the son of John Jones, her father's brother.  She named a son Benjamin, for her father and two other sons, William and Samuel, with the  names of two other brothers.  Some time after Adam Jones joined the 2nd Virginia Regiment of the Continental Line, Susannah Jones moved from Warren County to the southern part of then Bute, now Franklin, County, to join two of her sisters, Jane Darnall and Ann Young Paschall and brothers Thomas and Adam Jones who settled there in 1777. 

 

Susanna Jones' husband, Adam, died sometime before December 1791.  In that month, the Franklin County, North Carolina court apprenticed her sons William, Drury and Benjamin Jones to William Truelove who was to teach them to read and write and learn the coopers trade(Franklin Co., NC Court Minutes, Vol. 1, p. 176).  Benjamin was a son by William Truelove.  Adam Jones was father of William and Drury. 

 

An alleged will by William Truelove, stated that he was the father of four children by Susannah Jones, Samuel, Lucy, Stacey and Benjamin Jones  (Franklin County, NC, Loose Estate Papers, Vol. II, abs. by Stephen E. Bradley, Jr., p. 95).  That will, made on January 9, 1818, leaves to "my friend Susanah Jones all the balance of my property in land, negroes, stock, household and kitchen furniture during her life or widowhood" and names Lucy, Benjamin and Samuel Jones and Priscila Stacey as his children by Susannah. (For additional details see the notes for William Truelove.)

 

Notes for ADAM JONES:

Adam's father, John Jones, owned property on Smith's Creek in Granville (later Bute/Warren) County, North Carolina as early as 1750 (Granville Co. DB-B, p. 131) but John was present in in the area by 1747 ("History and Genealogies of Old Granville County 1746-1800" by Thomas M. Owen, p. 214).

 

A few records relating to Adam Jones:

 

-  -  - William and Betey Young, on August 7, 1764, sold  Adam Jones of "Virginney" 490 acres on Ashley's Branch (Bute Co NC DB-A, p. 13).  It was located on both sides of Mill Branch and the adjoining landowners were Hawkins and Porter.  The deed was witnessed by Daniel Ford, James Young, John Pope and Thomas Jones.

 

- - - Adam Jones was witness to a deed on October 25, 1764 from William Young to James Young, father of David Young (Bute Co., NC DB-A, p. 138).  The deed was for five acres, sold for 40 shillings, adjacent to the land where James Young lived.  Adam Jones proved the deed in court in January 1765.

 

- -  - On December 17, 1764, Adam Jones witnessed a deed from William Gray by which Gray sold 288 acres, "where I now live", for 60 pounds to Samuel Croxton (Warren County NC DB-A, p. 94).  The land was bought from Daniel Ford and was located on the east side of Hawtree Creek, adjoining Jacob Dansbe, at the Country Line (Virginia line?), John Jones and Samuel Bell's mill pond.  The deed was witnessed by Adam Jones, Daniel Ford, Edward Davis,and John Herndon and proved by Adam Jones on March 21, 1765.

 

- -   - In the next month, on January 26, 1765, Adam Jones sold the above 490 acres plus a Negro named Jack, livestock, farm equipment, furniture, etc. to his father, John Jones, for 200 pounds (Warren Co NC DB-A, p. 89). Three months later Adam Jones was a witness to the deed by which John Jones sold the land and property to Samuel Croxton (Warren Co., NC DB-A, p. 209-211).  Shortly thereafter, on August 20, 1765, Samuel Croxton sold the land to Benjamin Jones, Jr., Adam Jones' uncle (Warren Co., NC DB-1, p. 43-45).

 

- -  - Adam Jones witnessed the deed from John Jones to his (John's) son Godfrey Jones, on April 12, 1765 (Warren Co. NC DB-A, p. 163).

 

- - - John Hawkins,Sr.'s 1771 list of taxables (males 16 and over) shows Adam Jones and his brother Benjamin living with their father, John Jones.  The list of taxables in the Hawtree District for 1777 shows Adam Jones paying only a poll (List of Taxables Bute County 1777-1778, Warren County 1779-1780, NC Archives).

                                     --------------------------------------------

By June 1778, Adam Jones  was a private in the 2nd Virginia Regiment of the Continental Line.  His service record in the National Archives shows that he received 6 2/3 dollars in pay for June 1778 as a private in Captain Benjamin Hoomes Company. According to affadavits filed in support of a bounty land grant for his heir, Adam Jones served for more than three years.  His company was designated at various times as Captain Wood Jones' Company, "the Company formerly commanded by Capt. and Major Nicholas", Capt. Benjamin Hoomes Co. and Captain Alexander Parker's Company.  A current history of the 2nd VA Regiment shows that Company "C" was formed in Hanover County, Virginia by Capt. George Nicholas. The 2nd Virginia Regiment had a distinguished battle history and also endured the terrible Winter of 1777-78 at Valley Forge.

 

In late 1779, the 2nd VA Regiment was transferred from New York to Charleston, South Carolina, a city that soon came under seige by the British forces of Sir Henry Clinton.  After enduring months of near-starvation, the American forces surrendered in May 1780 and members of the 2nd Virginia were prisoners for the rest of the war.  However, according to some accounts, Captain Alexander Parker with about 100 men managed to escape and returned to Virginia where they took part in the Battle of Yorktown ("A Guide to Virginia Military Organizations in the American Revolution, 1774-1787", compiled by E. M. Sanchez-Saavedra, p. 34-38; Internet: http://www.secondvirginia.org/).  Whether Adam Jones was among those who escaped and took part in that battle has not been determined.

 

It is interesting to note that in his 1917 memoir, Oliver Smith Jones wrote that:  "Benjamin Jones ( a cousin to this Adam Jones) was sixteen years of age when the war for independence closed and was at the surrender of Cornwallis." Clearly family history had became a bit scrambled for our Benjamin Jones would have been only about ten when Cornwallis surrendered at Yorktown.  Perhaps in my ancestors retelling of family history, Adam Jones had become Benjamin Jones.

 

After the war he lived with his wife Susannah in Franklin County on Crooked Creek, a tributary of the Tar River.  Four of his wife's siblings, children of Benjamin Jones and Sarahan Perry Jones, were living in this area; sisters Ann Young Paschall,  Jane Darnall and brothers Thomas and Adam Jones. 

 

Crooked Creek rises in southwest Franklin County and flows first southeast and then northeast into the Tar River.  On a current map, the creek begins just to the southeast of Youngsville, flows southeast across Highway 401, turns south just before Highway 39 and parallels it until crossing the highway south of Bunn.  It then turns east and north, crosses Old Bunn Road and then Highway 98 before joining the Tar River near Sledge Road just southwest of Lake Royale.

 

Adam Jones, son of John, died sometime before December 1791.  The December 1791 session of the Franklin County court ordered that William Jones, Drury Jones and Benjamin Jones, "children of Susannah Jones", be bound to William Truelove and that they be taught to read and write and learn the coopers trade (Franklin County NC Court Minutes, Vol. II, abs. by Stephen E. Bradley, Jr., p. 55).  No record has been found of Adam Jones' estate.

 

Adam Jones' service of more than three years qualified his principal heir, son William Jones, for a Revolutionary War bounty land grant from the state of Virginia (Adam Jones Card #5, Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Digital Collections, Library of Virginia).  Affadavits in support of the petition, filed in 1804, in his behalf were made by:  Benjamin Jones, his brother then living in Wake County, NC; Dudley Ballard;  Amos Bridges; James Young of Franklin County, NC, probably the nephew of David Young the deceased husband of Ann Young Paschall, and Susanna Jones, Adam Jones' widow.  In her affadavit, his widow explained that her husband's military discharge was, by accident, torn up by one of their young children.  Amos Bridges stated that, after  Adam Jones returned home from the war, Jones showed him his discharge and said that it was all he ever got out of the war.  Dudley Ballard said that he was present when Adam Jones enlisted in the 2nd Virginia Regiment and knew that Jones had served for more than three years.

 

Dudley Ballard, of Franklin County, was related to the several Ballards who lived in the Hawtree Creek area of Warren County, where Adam Jones lived before the war. He served as a private in Lyltle's Company in the 10th Regiment of the North Carolina Continental Line for the year April 12, 1781-April 12, 1782 (The NC Historical and General Register, Vol.II, ed. by J. R. B. Hathaway, p. 184). After the revolution, Dudley Ballard returned to Warren County where he was on the Hawtree tax list for 1785 ((1785 Tax List, Warren County, NC, Twitty's and Hawtree Dist.) but moved sometime afterward to Franklin County.  He, too, received a Virginia Bounty Land Grant of 100 acres in Ohio for his service but the supporting affadavit on file in the Library of Virginia states that his service was in the"14th Virginia Regiment", not the 2nd Regiment. 

 

Amos Bridges was a neighbor to Ann Young Paschall in Franklin County after the war. He was a witness, on December 17, 1791, to a deed from Charles Darnall to Jeremiah Perry (Franklin Co., NC DB-7, p. 130).  The 1820 tax list for Franklin County shows Amos "Bridgers" with 323 1/4 acres of land valued at $3 an acre.

 

On January 25, 1805, Governor John Page signed a certificate entitling Adam Jones' representative to "..the proportion of land allowed a private of the Continental Line for three years service."  Adam's son, William Jones, on December 4, 1805, received  warrant #5092 for 100 acres in  Ohio ("Revolutionary War Records, Vol. I Virginia", Gaius Marcus Brumbaugh, p. 457; Virginia Revolutionary War Land Warrants, Book 2, p. 520).  It appears that William Jones sold the warrant to a land speculator, a common occurence.  Vast numbers of the Virginia Revolutionary War land warrants were sold by the original warrant holders to speculators who had surveys made and then sold the land to settlers or to other speculators.  In September 1809, warrant 5092 was used by Henry Massie, a large land speculator, to obtain a survey of  land in Huntington Township in Ross County, Ohio.  Henry Massie with his brother Nathaniel eventually owned a large portion of Ross County and helped bring about the settlement of the Chillecothe region of Ohio.

 

Notes for WILLIAM TRUELOVE:

William Truelove fathered four children by Susannah Jones while still married to his wife, Mary.  It is not known when the relationship with Susannah Jones began.  However, the December 1791 session of the Franklin County court ordered that William Jones, Drury Jones and Benjamin Jones, children of Susannah Jones, be bound to Truelove to be taught to read and write and to learn the cooper's trade (Franklin County Court Minutes, Vol. II, abs. by Stephen E. Bradley, Jr., p. 55).  So Susannah's husband, Adam Jones, was dead by this time.  Benjamin Jones was the son of William Truelove.  The deceased Adam Jones was the father of Drury and William Jones.

 

On March 26, 1776, William Truelove entered a claim for 402 acres in what became Franklin County in 1779 (Land Entries, C. R. 015.404.1, NC Archives).  The tract was described as north of Cedar Creek adjoining Osborn Jeffries, a large landowner, and Willis Perry.

 

William Truelove was in Captain Perry's tax district in 1799 taxed on 532 acres and three white polls.  The 1810 census for Franklin County, NC shows William Truelove's household with one male 10-16, one male 26-45 (William), one female 0-10, one female over 45 and one slave.

 

William Truelove, James Jones, Samuel Jones and many others were buyers at the estate sale of David Jeffreys, deceased, in Franklin County (Franklin Co., NC WB-B, p. 23). 

 

On August 8, 1813 by deed of gift, William Truelove gave a tract of land to Susannah for her lifetime and after her death ownership was to go to their son Samuel H. Jones (Franklin Co., NC DB-16, p. 128).  Truelove also made a deed of gift of land to Samuel on June 22, 1821 (Franklin Co., NC DB-20, p. 17).

 

The details of a will, alleged to have been made by William Truelove on January 9, 1818, reveal that he had six children by his wife Mary and also fathered at least four more by Susannah Jones, widow of Adam Jones (Franklin County, NC, Loose Estate Papers, Vol. II, abs. by Stephen E. Bradley, Jr., p. 95).  The alleged will provided:

 

- - To wife, Mary, all my property she has had or has in her possession;

 

- - To their daughters Selah, Nanney, Edy and Betsey the same provision plus $5 each;

- - To their daughter Salley the same provision plus $25 to educate her two oldest daughters and;

- - To their son Thomas all the property he has had or has in his possession (without an additional sum);

- - To Lucy and Benjamin Jones and "Priscila" Stacey, his children by Susannah Jones, he left the property they had of his plus $25; 

- - To "his friend" Susannah Jones he left all the balance of his property in land, negroes, stock, household and kitchen furniture during her life or widowhood with Samuel Jones, his son by Susannah, given the right to use the property allotted to Susannah to support both of them and, after her death or remarriage to be Samuel's.

 

The executors of the purported will were Samuel H. Jones and Susannah Jones.  Witnesses were D. Young (Demetrius Young son of David and Ann Young Paschall) and "Jere." (Jeremiah) Perry.

 

There was a challenge to the will.  Records show that written across the front is: "Judgement - that this is no will."  On October 22, 1821 Demetrius Young, son of David and Ann Young, gave a deposition in the case of Samuel H. Young vs. Ephroditus (Epp) Timberlake in which he stated that he wrote the will for the said William Truelove and witnessed it (Franklin County NC Court Minutes, Vol. II, abs. by Stephen E. Bradley, Jr., p. 95).  Epp Timberlake was later named by the court as administrator of the William Truelove estate. Timberlake submitted an account of the final estate sale to the June 1826 session of the Franklin County court (Franklin Co., NC WB-H, p. 152). Among the buyers were Susanna Jones, William Jones, her son by Adam Jones and Benjamin Jones, Truelove's son.   Apparently, Mary (Polly) Truelove, William's widow, got tired of waiting for her share and sold her dower interest in land on February 21, 1824 (Franklin Co., NC DB-21, p. 184).

 

What Susannah and the Jones children by William Truelove got out of the estate is not known.

 

                  ix.    ADAM JONES25, b. Abt. 1755, Granville County, NC26; d. Oct 01, 1830, Warren County, Georgia27; m. (1) UNKNOWN, Abt. 1775, NC; d. NC; m. (2) SUSANNAH DENMARK28,29, Abt. 1786, Georgia ?30; b. May 26, 1765, Pitt County, North Carolina31,32; d. May 13, 1821, Warren County, Georgia33; m. (3) NANCY BEXLEY34, Sep 20, 1821, Warren County, Georgia35; d. Bet. 1843 & 1845, Warren County, Georgia36.

 

Notes for ADAM JONES:

It appears that in the 1740s Benjamin and Johannah Jones, parents of Adam Jones, migrated from Virginia to the Hawtree Creek area in Granville County, North Carolina. This area in 1764 became Bute County and, in 1779, Warren County. 

 

But our Adam Jones was not the only Adam Jones on the scene.   The many Jones's living in this area during the Colonial era complicates, to say the least, genealogical research on this family.  The 1771 tax list of John Hawkins, Sr. shows Benjamin Jones with sons Thomas and Adam living next to Benjamin's brother, John Jones, and his sons Benjamin and Adam.  At this time sixteen was the minimum age for the poll  tax so both Adam Jones' were born before 1755.  By June 1778, Adam Jones' cousin, Adam Jones,  had joined the 2nd Virginia Regiment of the Continental Line as a private.

 

Records indicate that in 1777-1778 Adam Jones migrated South from upper Bute/Warren County, NC to  Cedar Creek, a tributary of the Tar River, along with or in the same time frame as his brother Thomas and sisters Jane Darnall and Ann Young. His sister Susannah was also living in this area by 1791 but, perhaps, arrived after her brothers.

 

In 1778, Adam Jones in on the tax list of Captain Bryant Ferrell, along with his brother Thomas and his sister Ann Young, assessed for 132 pounds.  On April 19, 1778 Adam Jones entered a claim for 250 acres at the head of Davis' Creek bordering D. Jeffreys and Osborn Jeffreys, a large land owner.  This land is near the Tar River in what became Franklin County in 1779.  The abstract states: "sent by T. Vinson; no land to be found".  Yet, on June 16, 1778 he received a grant for this land (Holcomb, Bute County, North Carolina, Land Grant Plats and Land Entries, p. 102).

 

At the estate sale for David Young, Ann Young's deceased husband, Thomas Jones, Adam Jones and Charles Darnall, the former Jane Jones's husband, were purchasers (Bute County Record Book 2, p. 258).  The report of the sale filed in the August 1778 term of the Bute County Court shows that Adam Jones bought a basin and a plate for 3 pounds, 5 shillings, 6 pence and an ax for 1 pound, 15 shillings (C. R. 015.508.2, List of Buyers, NC Archives).

 

On August 3, 1779, Adam Jones and Demetrius Young, son of Ann Young Paschall,  witnessed a deed from Isaiah and Ann Paschall to James Young for 180 acres on the south bank of Crooked Creek adjoining Ferrell and John Young.  The Ferrell was probably Captain Bryant Ferrell the local tax assessor and a substantial landowner.  Under the deed both Isaiah and Ann Paschall reserved the use of the land to themselves as long as either lived (Joseph W. Watson, "Abstracts of Early Deeds of Franklin County NC 1779-1797", p. 4).

 

Adam Jones was witness to other deeds over the next several years.  On December 22, 1779 he  witnessed four deeds and was the grantee on a fifth (Franklin Co., NC DB-1, p. 56-62).  In that transaction he bought 100 acres from Jesse Rowland on the Orney Branch adjoining Jeffries.

 

On September 3, 1783 he witnessed a deed  by which James Young sold the above tract of 180 acres back to Isaiah Paschall for 100 pounds (Franklin Co., NC DB-4, p. 76).  The land was described as lying on the south side of Crooked Creek at the mouth of Haw Branch and up said branch adjoining John Young and Ferrell,

 

Adam Jones left Franklin County sometime in 1785.  A deed dated September 26, 1785 for the foreclosure sale of a tract of land by Sheriff Roger Jones of Franklin County described the land as adjoining "..the lands that belonged to Joseph Bridges and Adam Jones.." indicating that it was no longer owned by them (Franklin Co., NC DB-5, p. 126).  The tract of 440 acres, adjoining David Jeffreys and John Perry,  was sold for 40 pounds to Thomas Stokes who, apparently, assumed some existing debt on the property.  Five months later, on February 17, 1786, Thomas Stokes sold the same tract, cited as lying on Cedar Creek, and the deed again listed Adam Jones and Joseph Bridges as previous owners of adjoining land (Franklin Co., NC DB-5, p. 175).  Adam Jones had "gone to Georgia."

 

Adam Jones was married three times, the name of his first wife unknown. It appears that they had at least four children, Thomas, Aaron, Elizabeth and Martha Ann, all born in North Carolina.   Susannah Denmark was the mother of his other seven children.  However, no record for either of his first two marriages has been found.  However, it appears that Adam and Susannah married after they migrated to Georgia from North Carolina.

 

Adam Jones and William Denmark, Susannah Denmark's father, both migrated to Georgia after the Revolution, perhaps together.   By 1786 Adam Jones had settled with his brothers Thomas, James and Samuel on Long Creek in Wilkes/Warren County and William Denmark was settled in Effingham/Bulloch County to the South.   Adam Jones' name does not appear on the 1785 tax list for Captain Ledbetter's District in Wilkes County although his brother Thomas' does (#46) as does Nathan Fowler.  By 1786 Adam Jones' name is on Captain Ledbetter's tax list paying only a poll.  In 1787 Captain Mitchell was in charge of this tax district and Adam Jones is again listed for only a poll. 

 

Methodism was strong in North Carolina where the Jones family lived.  The Rev. Francis Asbury, the first American Methodist bishop, passed through Bute/Warren County five times and preached at Hawtree Creek in June of 1780.  Adam Jones, raised as a Methodist, may have heard him preach.  But when he reached Wilkes County there were no Methodist churches in the area so he became a founding member of the Long Creek Baptist Church when it was organized in 1786.  However, it took the new convert some time to fully accept the Baptist principle of total immersion in baptism.  Mercer's History of the Georgia Baptist Association says about him: "Like many others, he appears to have been afflicted with a singular kind of hydrophobia upon this subject.  A cold shuddering took hold of the good man's feelings, when the thought of being 'buried with the Lord', according to Baptist usage came across his mind".  He was ordained by the church congregation as a minister in 1793 and took over as pastor at Long Creek church in 1807 where he served until 1825 when he resigned due to old age.  The records of the Long Creek Baptist Church are on microfilm in the Georgia Department of History and Archives in Atlanta (Microcopy AH 181, Box 61, Drawer 21) and the Library of the Baptist Sunday School Board in Nashville.

 

On October 1, 1788, Nathan Fowler deeded two acres for a permanent site for the Long Creek Baptist Church, the deed in the names of Adam Jones and Edmund Nugent acting for the church (Wilkes County GA DB-B, p. 80).   The deed also gave church members access to Nathan's spring some 200 yards West of the church site.

                                          

According to local history, over the years, two groups with permission,  broke off from the Long Creek church to form separate churches.  First was a church built by a Mr. Jewell, the owner of the cotton mill at what is now the town of Jewell.  Long Creek members who lived in the Jewell area had to cross the Ogeechee River to get to the Long Creek church.  Due to flooding, they often couldn't get there.  Although not a religious man, the mill owner, their employer, decided to remedy the problem by building a church of their own.  Two years later, the story goes, the owner got religion and joined the church he had created.

 

The second departure came after the Civil War when some Black members of the Long Creek congregation left to start their own church, now New Salem Baptist Church, several miles away.  It is said that a number of Black members stayed at Long Creek church after the split and some for life.

 

During the Civil War the church at Jewell had a narrow escape from General Sherman's march to the sea.  A Union officer, given orders to burn the mill, rode off on horseback to carry them out.  On reaching the mill a masonic emblem incorporated in the smokestack caught his eye.  Being a Mason himself, he could not bring himself to destroy this symbol of brotherhood.  Instead, he set fire to bales of cotton stacked outside, creating a splendid column of smoke that could be seen by the far away Union forces as evidence that the entire mill was burning.  Thus the mill was spared. 

                                           

In 1790, Adam Jones was co-executor with Arthur Fort of the will of Benjamin Nicholson who also migrated to Georgia from Bute/Warren County, NC, perhaps coming in the same wagon train as Adam and others in the Jones family.  His brother Thomas helped to inventory the estate (Early Records of Georgia, Vol. II, p. 266).  Adam Jones was an officer in the local militia in 1797.  He was commissioned as lieutenant on April 18, 1797 in the First Battalion commanded by Major John Larson (Excerpts from "Historical Collections of Georgia" Rootsweb/GA/Warren).  Burrell Perry, another immigrant from Bute County, NC, was commissioned lieutenant in the Second Battalion commanded by Major Solomon Slater on November 26, 1795.  William Smith, son-in-law of Nathan Fowler, was also an officer in the Second Battalion.

 

On March 23, 1790, Stephen and Celia Mitchell sold to Adam Jones 150 acres on Long Creek adjoining Arthur Fort for the sum of 50 pounds (Wilkes County, GA DB-A, p. 274).  His brother Thomas bought land from the Mitchells on the same day.  Eventually, Adam Jones became a substantial landowner along Long Creek.  On the 1805 Warren County tax list, he was taxed for 400 acres bought from the Mitchells and 108 acres bought from Nathan Fowler, the latter tract bought on March 29, 1796, part of a 300 acre grant that Nathan received in 1786 (Warren Co., GA DB-A, p. 275).  Adam Jones, Jr. was taxed for 220 acres.  

 

By 1805, Adam Jones was in Captain John B. Flourney's tax district where he was taxed on 400 acres adjoining Rushing that he had bought from Mitchell, probably Stephen Mitchell,  and on 108 acres next to Beall that he obtained from Nathan Fowler, both tracts located on Long Creek.  In addition, he owned six slaves.

 

Rev. Adam Jones' will, signed by his mark,  was made on October 14, 1826 and witnessed by John McCrary, Augustus Beall and William Jones.  It was proved in the Warren County Court on November 10, 1830 by John McCrary and Augustus Beall.  Executors were sons (by Susannah Denmark Jones) Elijah, Adam, Jr. and Stephen Jones.  Under the will he gave his son, Seaborn Jones, the tract of land where Adam Jones then lived, containing about 262 acres, plus another tract near his previous home.  He stated that he desired his wife, Nancy, continue to live in the home and share it equally with Seaborn Jones.  In the event of disagreement between Seaborn and his widow, he stated that the executors should work out  a satisfactory settlement. His wife was also given all of his livestock, farm vehicles and implements, household goods, furniture and  five slaves including two children.  Title to all of the property enumerated for her in Adam Jones' will, except for a Negro child named Charity, was conditioned on her remaining a widow.  To his son, Nathan Jones, Adam Jones gave land along Long Creek,  apparently where he first lived when he came to the area, as well as two Negroes, William and Frank.  All property not specifically disposed of under the will plus the property given to his wife, in the event of her death or remarriage, was to be equally divided among his other children, named in the will; Thomas Jones, Patsy (Martha) Fowler, Aaron Jones, Elizabeth Glover, Simon Jones, Elijah Jones, Adam Jones, Stephen Jones and Susannah Chambless.

 

Three years after Adam Jones' death, on February 26, 1833, Nancy Jones married Thadeus Camp. Under the terms of Adam's will, the property willed to her was to be sold and the proceeds divided among the children named in the will. On March 16, 1833, the executors held a sale of the chattels willed to Nancy Jones.  Most of the items were sold to Adam Jones' sons.  Among the buyers were Adam Jones, Seaborn Jones, Simon Jones, Samuel Jones (brother of Rev. Adam Jones), Sterling Jones, Stephen Jones, Wilson Jones (son of Elijah Jones) and Milford Jones (kinship unknown).  Other buyers included Zephaniah Fowler, husband of Martha (Patsy) Jones, and their son Terah Fowler. 

 

The house where Adam Jones lived was still standing until the 1980s and then belonged to Allen Howell. It was near the Ogeechee River on Georgia Highway 16, about one-fourth to one-half mile east of the Hancock County line and five miles east of Jewell's Mill.  But by the time of the 2000 Jones Reunion at Long Creek Church it was gone.  Earlier it had been said that, going west,  the large old house stood high on a bank off the left side of the highway not far from the road to the Long Creek Church where he served as pastor. According to local information, an iron fenced burial plot containing the graves of Rev. Jones, Susannah Jones and J. W. H. Jones, a grandson, was located in a field about 300 yards behind where the house stood.

 

Notes for SUSANNAH DENMARK:

Susannah Denmark Jones was the daughter of William Batchelor Denmark and the former Anna Moye.  See the notes under William Batchelor Denmark for further information on this interesting family.  In a deed of gift dated January 21, 1795, William Batchelor Denmark gave property to his wife,"Anna and her children."  To his daughter, Susannah Jones, he gave a "Negro wench called Rose" but stipulated that Rose's first child to be born after the date of the deed should be given to Susannah's sister, Livisa Rester (Effingham Co., GA DB CD, p. 279, Jan. 21, 1795).

 

It is likley that Susannah Denmark was Adam Jones' second wife.  The will of Adam's son, Elijah Jones who was born in 1780, refers to a half-brother named Aaron (Rankin County, MS WB-1, p. 330). More research is needed to determine which of Adam Jones'  many children were Susannah's.

 

 A " Susanna Jones" is on the 1788 list of original members of the Long Creek Baptist Church. 

 

Susannah is buried in the Jones Family Cemetery near the Long Creek Church in Warren County, Georgia.

 

Notes for NANCY BEXLEY:

Nancy Bexley's first husband was the Rev. Adam Jones, pastor of the Long Creek Baptist Church from 1812 until 1825.  After his death in 1830, in 1833 she married Thaddeus Camp, a prominent member of the church and a recent widower.

 

                   x.    JAMES JONES, b. Bef. 1755, Granville County, North Carolina; d. Abt. Oct 1803, Jackson County, GA37; m. (1) MARY; m. (2) ISABELLA WRIGHT, Abt. Dec 21, 1778, Wilkes County, NC38.

 

Notes for JAMES JONES:

Because there were several James Jone's in Bute County, NC in the pre-Revolutionary War period, it has not been possible to positively identify  from the public records which one was our James Jones.

 

It appears that James Jones left the Hawtree Creek area after his father died, probably with his brothers Thomas and Adam, and travelled south to near the Tar River.  James Jones is on the tax list for Captain Bryant Ferrill in 1778, paying only a poll tax (List of Capt. Ferrill, Bute/Warren County Tax Lists 1777-1780, C. R. X. 281, p. 46).  His brothers Thomas and Adam and sister Ann Young were also on Capt. Ferrill's list for that year.

 

Sometime in 1778, he and his brothers Thomas and William went west together from Bute County to Wilkes County. They may have traveled with William Gilreath, Jr. and Alexander Gilreath who made the journey at about the same time.  In any case, on December 22, 1778, James Jones made an entry for 200 acres on Fishing Creek in Wilkes County adjoining his brother Thomas' line (Land Entry Book, Wilkes County, NC 1778-1781, abstracted by Mrs. W, O. Absher, p. 36).  It was almost four years, on October 23, 1782, before he was issued a land grant,  for 219 acres on the West Fork of Fishing Creek adjoining Holden's line (Wilkes Co., NC DB-A-1, p. 236).

 

On December 22, 1779, back temporarily from Wilkes County, he bought 125 acres from Jesse Rowland, a land speculator (Franklin Co., NC DB-1, p. 61).  On the same day his brother, Adam Jones, bought 100 acres from the same Jesse Rowland (op. cit., p. 58).  Both tracts were described as being located on the Orney Branch adjoining Jeffries.

 

In Wilkes County, James Jones and brothers Thomas and William were members of Captain William Lenoir's county militia.  All three are listed as having either participated in the campaign that led to the famous  Battle of King's Mountain on October 7, 1780 or in the battle itself ("The Patriots at King's Mountain", Bobby G. Moss, 1990, p. 278, 286 and Pat Alderman, "One Heroic Hour at King's Mountain", p. 61). 

 

Wilkes County records show that a bond was issued on December 21, 1778 for a marriage between James Jones and Isabella Wright with Thomas Jones (Sr.) as bondsman (Marriage Bonds Wilkes County NC, p. 139).  William Lenoir, captain of the local militia and later county court clerk, was a witness to his signing. However, Isabella must have died prematurely because at James' death in 1803 in Jackson County, Georgia his wife was Mary, called "Polly",  who was appointed administrator of his estate. In Wilkes County, NC on January 1, 1780,  James signed, by mark, a bond for the marriage of Rebeckah Jones and Thomas "Nuberry" (op. cit., p. 187).  "Rebeckah" was probably a daughter of Thomas Jones.  Thomas Newberry was also a member of Captain William Lenoir's Wilkes County militia.

 

On March 6, 1782, Benjamin Greer brought suit against James Jones in the Wilkes County court but the basis for this suit or its' outcome are not known.  Benjamin Greer married Sarah Jones, daughter of Benjamin Jones, on April 26, 1791.  Whether or not this Benjamin Jones, active in land sales in Wilkes County, was related to our Jones' of Granville/Bute/Warren County, NC remains to be seen.

 

Sometime in the mid-1780s, four of the Jones brothers, James, Thomas, Adam and Samuel, migrated south to Wilkes County, Georgia, whether together or in two contingents, we do not know.  Apparently, brother William stayed behind in Wilkes County, NC.  In 1785 James appeared as #19 on Captain Newsom's tax list for Wilkes County, Georgia (became Warren Co. in 1794)  living in the Long Creek area paying only a poll.  Two names away on the tax list was William Smith, son-in-law to Nathan Fowler who was #29.  Adam Jones was #46 also paying only a poll.

 

At some time in 1801-1802, James and Thomas moved from Warren County to Jackson County.  Brothers Adam and Samuel remained in Warren County.  On September 15, 1802 for $225, James Jones bought from George and Miriam Bagby 150 acres of land on Beech Creek adjoining Few and Dickens (Jackson County GA DB-D, p. 258).  The deed was witnessed by John and David Ship and recorded  on June 25, 1805, after James' death.  In 1802 he was in Captain Aaron Woods' tax district and taxed 38 1/2 cents on 75 acres on Cedar Creek (Jackson County, GA Tax Digest 1802, p. 65).  Perhaps he had bought these 75 acres before the above purchase.

 

We do not know when James died but, on October 25, 1803, the Jackson County court issued a citation to Mary Jones ordering her to obtain letters of administration on his estate (Jackson County GA Early Court Records, p. 43).  On July 19, 1804, an inventory was taken of the estate by George Bagby, John Bagby and William Pentecost.  James' estate was valued at $245.87 and 1/2 cent.  An itemized list of the sale items and the prices they brought was presented to the court clerk by Mary Jones on July 19, 1804.  It showed that she bought everything, except two small items valued at less that one dollar, for a total of $247.36 1/2 cent.

 

Notes for MARY:

On the 1803 Jackson County, Georgia tax list, Mary "Polly" Jones was in Captain Woods' district, next to Peter Tidwell, with 150 acres on Beech Creek, land originally granted to George Bagby.  This appears to be the land sold to James Jones by George and Miriam Bagby on which the deed was not recorded until 1805, two years after James' death (Jackson Co., GA DB-C, p. 258).

 

After James death in 1803, the following events took place:

 

- - October 25, 1803 - The Jackson County Court issued a citation to Mary Jones to obtain letters of administration for her deceased husband's estate (Jackson Co., GA Early Court Records, p. 43).

 

- - January 24, 1804 - The court granted letters of administration to Mary Jones (op. cit., p. 144).

 

- - January 30, 1804 - Agrippa Atkinson posted $500 bond for Mary Jones' administration of James' estate (op. cit., p. ?).

 

- - July 19, 1804 - An inventory of James' estate, appraised at $245.87 1/2 cents, was filed by George and John Bagby and William Pentecost. Mary Jones bought many articles at the estate sale (GA Archives Microfilm, drawer 168, roll 35, pp. 177-179).

 

- - September 5, 1805 - After hearing Mary's petition that Benjamin Camp be made a joint administrator of James Jones' estate, the court approved her request (Jackson County, GA, Early Court Records, p. 170).

 

- - January 2, 1809 - Agrippa Atkinson petitioned the Jackson County court to relieve him of his security commitment in the matter of James Jones' estate because Mary Jones was about to leave the county (op. cit., pp. 172-173).

 

- - March 6, 1809 - The Jackson County court held Mary in contempt for not providing other security as the court ordered.  Benjamin Camp came into court and said that he would be the security for Mary (op. cit., p. 176).

                                                                   -------------------------------------------

 

Mary "Polly" Jones had two draws in the 1805 Jackson County land lottery, one as the widow of James Jones and one for his orphan children (names unknown).  Both draws were blank.

 

We do not know when Mary Jones left Jackson County but the minutes of the Long Creek Baptist Church for January 26, 1811 show that a Mary Jones was "received by experience". Also, the April 25, 1818 church minutes state: "..we had the happiness to receive Polly Jones by letter from Posetton Church..".  We are not certain that either was Mary "Polly" Jones the widow of James Jones.  Later minutes show that a Mary P. Jones died on September 8, 1837. 

 

                  xi.    WILLIAM JONES, b. Aft. 1756, Granville Co., NC; d. Aft. 1802, Wilkes County, NC; m. (1) RACHEL BACKOR39, Abt. Aug 11, 1783, Wilkes County, NC; d. Bef. Nov 1802; m. (2) NANCY MITCHELL40, Abt. Nov 27, 1802, Wilkes County, NC; b. Abt. 1786.

 

Notes for WILLIAM JONES:

Benjamin Jones' will left his farm to his sons William and Samuel Jones to take effect either when his wife Johannah remarried or upon her death.  During her occupancy of the farm, the will specified that the land was to be controled for her benefit by John Gilbreath her son-in-law and husband of her daughter Johannah. John Gilreath migrated with his family to Wilkes County, NC in 1780.  It is not clear what happened to the farm . 

 

However in 1778, William with his brothers Thomas and James Jones trekked west from Bute County( the part that is now in Franklin County) to Wilkes County, NC.  The three Jones brothers filed claims for adjoining lands.  Williams' first land entry was for 100 acres on Fishing Creek adjoining his brother Thomas ("Land Entry Book, Wilkes County, North Carolina - 1778-1781", compiled by Absher, p. 92). Thomas filed a land entry that same day for 100 acres adjoining James Jones' line. The next grant to William Jones came through an entry made by Benjamin Cleveland, a Revolutionary War hero, for 200 acres on the New River that was transferred to William (op. cit., p. 82).

 

All three brothers were members of Captain William Lenoir's Wilkes County militia.  They either participated in the campaign leading up to or in the actual Battle of King's Mountain ( 1."The Patriots at King's Mountain", Bobby G. Moss, 1990, p. 278, 286; 2. Pat Alderman, "One Heroic Hour at King's Mountain", p. 61; 3.  Excerpts from Vol. IX, No. 3, 1905, Southern History Association, published in the Fall 1985 Bulletin of the Wilkes County (NC) Genealogical Society; and 3.  List of Capt. Wm. Lenoir's Company at King's Mountain, Peter Thompson Papers, P. C. 1377.1, NC Archives).  William Jones is listed on William Lenoir's payroll for that expedition with 42 days of service (Early Settlers of the Reddies River, by Paul Gregory, p. 43).  William Jones is also listed as having served 8 days with Captain Lenoir on an expedition to Ramsoners (?), June 17-August 20, 1780 (op. cit., p. 44).

 

By the end of 1785 his two brothers, Thomas and James, had moved South to Wilkes County, Georgia.  Their names do not appear on the 1787 census for Wilkes County, North Carolina. However,  William chose to remain in North Carolina.  He is on the 1787 Tax List of Captain Nathaniel Vannoy for 300 acres, the amount of land he obtained in the two grants (1787 Wilkes County NC Tax List). 

 

On about August 11, 1783, William Jones married Rachel Backor, the bond signed with William's mark and provided by Edward Harris (Marriage Bonds Wilkes County NC, County Courthouse, p. 140).   Four months earlier, on April 12, 1783, Edward Harris married Catherine Jones, Thomas Jones' daughter.  Thomas signed the marriage bond.

 

In the Wilkes County census taken by Rowland Judd in July 1787, the William Jones household consisted of himself, a white male less than 21 or over 60 (probably a young son) and two females (likely his wife and young daughter).  The 1790 Federal census lists William's household in the 16th Company as consisting of himself and two females, the same as in the 1787 North Carolina state census.  His first wife must have died before November 1802 because on November 27th of that year, he obtained a bond, signed by his mark, to marry Nancy Mitchell with the bond posted by Moses Mitchell, apparently a brother to Nancy.  The bond was witnessed by William B. Lenoir, former leader of the local militia in which William and his brothers had been members. 

 

                 xii.    SAMUEL JONES, b. Abt. 1757, Granville County, NC; d. Oct 1850, Chattahoochee County, Georgia41; m. ELIZABETH CASTLEBERRY, Abt. 1795, Warren County, GA; d. Bef. Mar 02, 1859, Sumter County, Georgia42.

 

Notes for SAMUEL JONES:

Under the terms of Benjamin Jones's will (he died in 1777),  his sons Samuel  and William inherited the family farm in Bute County, North Carolina after their mother's death or re-marriage (Bute Co., NC Record Book 2, p. 122).  However, the farm was to remain under the control of John Gilreath as long as Benjamin's widow was alive.

                                                        -------------------------------------------

Although there is not a clear picture of what happened to Bejamin Jones' land after his death, tax records reveal the following:

 

- - - Benjamin Jones' property was assessed for 212 pounds on the 1777 Hawtree Creek tax list ("List of Taxables Bute County 1777-1778", p 13, NC Archives).  Samuel Jones is not on the list, probably underage, and John Gilreath is taxed for a poll only.

 

- - - Samuel Jones appears on the 1778 Bute County tax list in Captain John Colclough's District with taxable property valued at 390 pounds (op. cit., p. 41).  John Gilreath is in the same district taxed on property of 36 pounds, 9 shillings and 1/2 pence.  So it appears that Samuel is being taxed on the land and property that belonged to his father who died in the preceeding year.

                                                       

- - - Samuel is not on the 1779 tax list for the Smith's Creek and Hawtree Creek District but John Gilreath's taxable property in that district has increased from 36 pounds to 507 pounds.  It seems that John Gilreath is now being taxed for Benjamin Jones' estate.

                                                   -------------------------------------------

On December 10, 1778, Samuel Jones filed for a grant of 112 acres on Hawtree Creek, in the area where his father had lived ("Bute Co., NC Land Grant Plats and Land Entries", Holcomb, p. 17).  In 1779, William, along with brothers Thomas and James, went West to Wilkes County, North Carolina.  A year later, their mother also migrated to Wilkes County with her daughter Johanna and son-in-law, John Gilreath.  We do not know what happened to the land Samuel and William inherited from their father.

 

In 1785, Samuel  and brothers Thomas, James and Adam, and other members of the Jones family, migrated to Wilkes County, Georgia.  He was on the list of original members of the Long Creek Baptist Church along with brothers Thomas and Adam and brother-in-law Charles Darnall.   But on July 19, 1789, after disregarding admonitions from the church, Samuel was excommunicated for the "crimes" of "dancing and keeping rude company" (Georgia Dept. of Archives and History,Microcopy AH 181, Box 61, Drawer 21, Minutes of the Long Creek Baptist Church).  No evidence has been found that he sought re-admission to the church although his wife, Elizabeth, daughter, Johanna and son Benjamin were members of the church until the family departed for Muscogee/Chattahoochee County, Georgia.

 

Early tax lists for Wilkes County are incomplete.  In 1792 a Samuel Jones is #120 on Captain Medlock's tax list for Wilkes County, paying only a poll tax.  This was the same district in which his brothers, Thomas and Adam Jones, lived.  In 1801, Samuel, Thomas and Adam are living as neighbors in Captain Abercrombie's district.  .

 

The 1805 Warren County, Georgia tax list (formed from Wilkes in 1794) shows Samuel Jones owning 195 acres with Fowler as the grantor, probably Nathan Fowler, and adjoining Lovett (Blair, Some Early Georgia Tax Digests, p. 202).  He was in Captain John B. Flourney's district as #67 living next to Rev. Adam Jones.

 

In 1806 he and Nathan Castleberry were listed as adjoining landowners in a deed from Samuel Camp to John Turner (Warren Co., GA DB-C, p. 529).   Samuel Jones, Arthur Jenkins and James Lowe, on February 18, 1815, filed an appraisal of Nathan Castleberry's estate with the Warren County, Court (Crumpton, Warren County Georgia 1793-1900-Genealogy II, p. 273).  Nathan Castleberry and a number of other Castleberrys were members of the Long Creek Baptist Church.   

 

In 1818 there was a Samuel Jones on Captain McCrary's tax list with four slaves and 195 acres on Long Creek bought from one Whatley and adjoining Robertson (Early Georgia Tax Digests, p. 239). This appears to be the same land as that on the 1805 list although that list has Fowler as the grantor.  A separate entry on that page shows that he also paid the taxes on 75 acres and one poll for both his son, Benjamin, and his son-in-law, Larkin Glover.  The land was described as on the Ogeechee River and adjoined Fort.

 

In the 1827 Georgia Land Lottery, Samuel Jones drew Lot 297 in the 32nd District of Lee County, now Chattahoochee County.  This was at a place called Gobbler's Hill (Manta) and he later owned much other land nearby.  He was still living in this area when he died.

 

The 1820 census for Warren County, GA , p. 281, shows Samuel Jones with a household of two males 10-15, one male 16-26, one male over 45, two females under 10, one 16-26 and one over 45.  The 1830 census for Warren County, p. 228, shows his household consists of males: one 5-10, one  20-30, one 30-40 and one 70-80.  Females were: one 0-5, one 5-10, two 10-15, one 15-20 and one 60-70.  With so many young children in the household, it appears that one or more of his children are living with him.  It appears that Samuel Jones was still in Warren County as late as 1833.  A Samuel Jones purchased several items on March 16, 1833 at the sale of the estate for Nancy Jones, the wife of Samuels Jones' deceased brother, the Rev. Adam Jones.

 

Later in the 1830s, Samuel Jones and his family joined many others from Warren County in migrating across the state to Muscogee/Chattahoochee County.  The minutes of the Long Creek Baptist Church of Warren County show that Samuel's wife Elizabeth and her daughter Johanna were dismissed from church membership on November 21, 1834, probably marking their departure on that journey.  In the 1840 census for Muscogee County, Georgia, Samuel Jones (Muscogee Co., GA census, #312, 678th District) is shown with a household of one male 70-80 and females one 20-30 and one 60-70.

 

A deed, recorded in Muscogee County in 1845, gives his grandaughter, Mary Elizabeth Jones, daughter of William T. and Polly Jones, a negro girl named Phebe.  On October 7, 1850, Samuel Jones made a deed of gift  of eight Negroes to his son, John Keeling Jones, in return for John's promise to provide for his parents and his sister, Katherine, an invalid cripple (Muscogee Co., GA DB E, p. 494). The deed was witnessed by James Kelly and Charles R. Kelly and recorded on January 3, 1851.  It appears that he died sometime between the date of that deed and when the census was taken for the NcNorton's District between October 18-28.

 

There was considerable controversy over Samuel Jones' estate and settlement took many years, beginning with a challenge to the will in 1851 and finally ending in 1864.  Under Samuel Jones' will, his son John Keeling Jones, was named as executor.  However, the will and a codicil to it was challenged in the January 1851 term of the Muscogee County Court by William Bagley and his wife Johannna, one of Samuel's daughters, and Melford Jones, one of Samuel's three sons.   They petitioned the court to set aside the will and the codicil to it on the grounds that Samuel's wife, Elizabeth, another of Samuel's sons, John Keeling Jones, and James Castleberry, John Keeling Jones' brother-in-law, had used false statements and physical coercion to persuade a mentally incompetent Samuel to make the will and codicil which, in effect, disinherited Bagley and his wife. 

 

Bagley's whipping of five slaves for what he called "criminal violations" figured prominently in the probate proceedings.  Bagley alleged that following the whippings, Elizabeth Jones complained to Samuel that Bagley was cruel and inhumane to the slaves and should not share in Samuel's estate.  Samuel's will, which Bagley later challenged, was made shortly thereafter.

 

In rebuttal to Bagley's allegations, John Keeling Jones testified that his father was of sound mind when he made the will.   In deciding the issue, the Muscogee Court admitted the will, but not the codicil, to probate and appointed Bagley as the temporary administrator of the estate pending an appeal by both sides to the Superior Court.  Bagley remained as administrator of Samuel Jones' estate for many years and in February 1860 jurisdiction was transferred from Muscogee County to Chattahoochee County. 

 

On January 7, 1862, forty eight slaves were sold at an estate sale, probably by auction.  Several were bought by members of Samuel Jones' family.  His son Benjamin bought four as did his son-in-law William P. Jones.  Larkin Glover, another son-in-law, bought  two.  Six other Jones' also bought slaves at the sale.

 

Notes for ELIZABETH CASTLEBERRY:

The minutes of the Long Creek Baptist Church in Warren County, Georgia show that Elizabeth Jones was admitted as a member, by baptism, on June 25, 1808.  Elizabeth, her daughter Johanna and son Benjamin were dismissed from the church membership on November 21, 1834.  This is probably when Samuel Jones and his family left on their journey across the state to Muscogee/Chattahoochee County, Georgia.

 

In Sumter County, Georgia, Elizabeth Jones made a will, signed with her mark and dated August 28, 1855, in which she left her entire estate to be divided equally between her son William Jones, son-in-law Larkin Glover, and the unnamed children of daughter Mary Ann Jones, the wife of William P. Jones.  Her friend and neighbor, Andrew J. Williams, was named as executor.  The will was probated on March 2, 1859.

 

 

 

Endnotes

 

1.  Warren County NC Will Book 2, p. 122.

2.  AFN:QGDN-V6.

3.  Pittman Papers, P.C. 123.9, North Carolina Archives, 1771 Tax List of John Hawkins, Bute Co., NC.

4.  Granville Co., NC DB-A, p. 88.

5.  Minutes of Long Creek Baptist Church.

6.  Will of Isaiah Paschall, Franklin Co., NC, Dec. 9, 1795.

7.  Granville Co., NC DB-C, p. 439.

8.  1779 discharge from the Granville Co. militia for health.

9.  Franklin Co., NC WB-?, p. 19, Will dated Dec. 9, 1795.

10.  Will of William Noles, Warren Co., NC DB-7, p. 242.

11.  Warren Co., NC WB-2, p. 122.

12.  Will of Edward Knowls, Bute County, NC,  Nov. 2, 1764.

13.  Will of William Knowls, Warren County, NC  WB-7, p. 242-243.

14.  Bute Co, NC DB-1, p. 252.

15.  Bute County, NC Court Minutes, p. 19.

16.  Records of Long Creek Baptist Church, Warren Co., GA.

17.  Wilkes Co., NC DB-L, p. 273.

18.  Rootsweb - Selvage and Peterson Families.

19.  MMGilr@aol.com.

20.  Affadavit of Susanna Jones, Revolutionary War Bounty Warrants, Digital Collection, Library of VA.

21.  Bute Co., NC 1771 List of Taxables of John Hawkins, PC 123.9, NC Archives.

22.  Bute Co., NC DB-A, p. 13.

23.  Franklin County, NC Court Minutes , Vol. II, abstracted by Stephen E. Bradley, Jr., p. 55.

24.  Franklin Co., NC, Loose Estate Papers Vol. II, abs. by Stephen E. Bradley, Jr., p. 95.

25.  AFN:QGDR-NK.

26.  1771 Bute County Tax List of John Hawkins.

27.  "Cemeteries and Genealogy - Warren County Georgia 1792-1987".

28.  AFN:QGDG-HG.

29.  Denmark Family Bible Record.

30.  Deed of William B. Denmark, Effingham Co., GA DB C-D, p. 279.

31.  William Denmark's Bible.

32.  Tombstone in Jones Cemetery, Warren Co., GA.

33.  Minutes of the Long Creek Baptist Church, Warren County, GA.

34.  "Camp-Jones and Related Families" by Nell Carter Jones, p. 87.

35.  AFN:QGDR-PQ.

36.  "Camp-Jones and Related Families" by Nell Jones Carter, 88.

37.  Jackson County, Georgia - Early Court Records, p. 43.

38.  Marriage Bonds - Wilkes County, North Carolina, p. 139.

39.  Marriage Bonds Wilkes County North Carolina, County Courthouse, p. 140.

40.  Marriage Bonds Wilkes County North Carolina, County Courthouse.

41.  Will probate, Muscogee Co., GA, Jan. 1851.

42.  Jack F. Cox, History of Sumter County, Georgia, 1983.

 

 


Copyright 2002 -2006 by Nola Duffy, Ginger Christmas Beattie and/or individual contributors as shown.  No portion of the data found herein is to be used for anything other than your personal family research.  No portion of anything found herein is to used for any commercial purpose. It is not to be  reprinted, redistributed, republished or reposted in any manner without express written consent of the owner of the data.

Top