Medal of Honor Recipients for North Carolina

Army * Navy-Marine Corps-Coast Guard * Air Force

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the President of the United States be, and he is hereby, authorized to cause two thousand "medals of honor" to be prepared with suitable emblematic devices, and to direct that the same be presented, in the name of the Congress, to such non--commissioned officers and privates as shall most distinguish themselves by their gallantry in action, and other soldier-like qualities, during the present insurrection (Civil War).

Complete listing of Medal of Honor Recipients by state at "Home of Heroes"

 

DOWN TO: Civil War -- Indian Wars -- Spanish-American War -

- Philippine Insurrection -- Mexican War, Veracruz -- World War I -

- World War II -- Korean War -- Vietnam War -- Gulf Wars -

Sources below.

Alphabetical list of the North Carolina Medal of Honor Recipients

Anderson, Edwin A. Ashley, Eugene (Jr.) Barrow, David D. (aka Barron)
Blackwell, Robert L. Brown, Lorenzo D. Crump, Jerry K. Durham, Harold B.
Eubanks, Ray E. George, Charles Franks, William J. Halyburton, William D. (Jr.)
Herring, Rufus G. Joel, Lawrence Johnston, Gordon Johnston, Rufus Zenas
Jones, William H. Lucas, Jacklyn H. McBryar, William Miller, Franklin D.
Murray, Charles P. (Jr.) Parker, Samuel I. Parker, Pomeroy Patterson, Robert M.
Ray, Charles W. Sanderson, Aaron (aka Anderson) Shea, Joseph J. Staton, Adolphus
Stoddard, James Stout, Mitchell Thompson, Max Trogden, Howell G.
Urban, Matt L. Warner, Henry F. Womack, Bryant H.
(Denotes last located as living: 25 Sep 2010)
NC Counties Referenced

Bertie, Buncombe, Cabarrus, Catawba, Chatham, Craven, Cumberland, Davidson,

Edgecombe, Forsyth, Gates, Greene, Haywood, Lenoir, Lincoln, Mecklenburg,

Montgomery, Nash, Sampson, Swain, Union, Wake, Washington, Yancey.

Medals awarded to soldiers (click on the linked medal name to see a list of all recipients of that medal.)

Marine Corps Brevet Award (obsolete) -- Distinguished Service Cross -- Distinguished Service Medal -- Silver Star --

-- Defense Superior Service Medal -- Legion of Merit -- Distinguished Flying Cross --

-- Soldier's Medal: Army Medal; Navy and Marine Corps Medal; Airman's Medal; Coast Guard Medal --

-- Bronze Medal and Valor -- Purple Heart --

Marine Corps Brevet Award (obsolete)

The Marine Corps Brevet Medal, also known as the Brevet Medal, was a military decoration of the United States Marine Corps; it was created in 1921 as a result of Marine Corps Order Number 26. The decoration was a one-time issuance and retroactively recognized living Marine Corps officers who had received a brevet rank. The similar practice of frocking continues in all five branches of the U.S. Armed Forces.

Brevet promotions were used by the United States military in some capacity from 1775 until they were discontinued in 1900. The Army was the only branch authorized to grant brevets until 1814, when the Marine Corps was granted the same privilege. For the 86 years, the Marine Corps awarded 121 brevet promotions to 100 Marine Corps officers. Captain Anthony Gale was the first to receive a brevet promotion in 1814 and John Twiggs Myers, who died in 1952, was the last surviving recipient.

In 1921 Commandant John A. Lejeune requested that a Marine Corps Brevet Medal be authorized; after it was approved and created, the decoration was given to the last 21 living Marine Corps officers who received brevet promotions.

 

Army Distinguished Service Cross

The Distinguished Service Cross (DSC) is the second highest military decoration that can be awarded to a member of the United States Army, for extreme gallantry and risk of life in actual combat with an armed enemy force. Actions that merit the Distinguished Service Cross must be of such a high degree to be above those required for all other U.S. combat decorations but not meeting the criteria for the Medal of Honor. The Distinguished Service Cross is equivalent to the Navy Cross (Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard) and the Air Force Cross (Air Force).

The Distinguished Service Cross was first awarded during World War I. In addition, a number of awards were made for actions before World War I. In many cases, these were to soldiers who had received a Certificate of Merit for gallantry which, at the time, was the only other honor besides the Medal of Honor the Army could award. Others were belated recognition of actions in the Philippines, on the Mexican Border and during the Boxer Rebellion.

This decoration is distinct from the Distinguished Service Medal, which is awarded to persons in recognition of exceptionally meritorious service to the government of the United States in a duty of great responsibility.

Distinguished Service Medal

The Distinguished Service Medal is the highest non-valorous military and civilian decoration of the United States of America military which is issued for exceptionally meritorious service to the government of the United States in either a senior government service position or as a senior officer of the United States armed forces or other Uniformed services. There is also the President's Award for Distinguished Federal Civilian Service which is the highest medal that can be awarded to a career government employee.

Defense Distinguished Service Medal
Army
Navy
Air Force
Coast Guard

The Distinguished Service Medal was authorized by Presidential Order dated January 2, 1918, and confirmed by Congress on July 9, 1918.

The Distinguished Service Medal is issued both as a military decoration and civilian award. The Army version of the Distinguished Service Medal is typically referred to simply as the "Distinguished Service Medal" while the other branches of service use the service name as a prefix. The following versions (awarded by the agency or department head) of the Distinguished Service Medal are currently issued by the United States government.

Silver Star

The Silver Star is the third-highest military decoration that can be awarded to a member of any branch of the United States armed forces for valor in the face of the enemy.

The Silver Star is awarded for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States not justifying one of the two higher awards - the service crosses (Distinguished Service Cross, the Navy Cross, or the Air Force Cross), the second-highest military decoration, or the Medal of Honor, the highest decoration. The Silver Star may be awarded to any person who, while serving in any capacity with the armed forces, distinguishes himself or herself by extraordinary heroism involving one of the following actions:

In action against an enemy of the United States
While engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force
While serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party

Defense Superior Service Medal (Recipient Web sites)

The Defense Superior Service Medal is a senior United States military decoration of the Department of Defense, awarded to members of the United States armed forces who perform "superior meritorious service in a position of significant responsibility."

The decoration is most often presented to senior officers in the flag and general officer grades. The medal is presented in the name of the Secretary of Defense and was established by President Gerald R. Ford on February 6, 1976 in Executive Order 11904. It is somewhat analogous to the Legion of Merit, albeit awarded for service in a "joint" duty capacity.

The first recipient of the Defense Superior Service Medal was Army Brigadier General John G. Jones, for service as the Military Assistant to the Deputy Secretary of Defense from February 1972 to July 1975.

Legion of Merit

The Legion of Merit was established by Act of Congress (Public Law 671, 77th Congress) approved July 20, 1942, and by Executive Order 9260 signed on October 29, 1942, by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Award of the Legion of Merit is retroactive to September 8, 1939.

The Legion of Merit is awarded to members of the Armed Forces of the United States without degree for exceptionally outstanding conduct in the performance of meritorious service to the United States. The performance must merit recognition by individuals in a key position which was performed in a clearly exceptional manner. The performance of duties normal to the grade branch, specialty or assignment and experience of an individual is not an adequate basis for this award.

For service rendered in peacetime, the term "key individual" applies to a narrower range of positions than would be the case in time of war and requires evidence of significant achievement. In peacetime, service should be in the nature of a special requirement or of an extremely difficult duty performed in an unprecedented and clearly exceptional manner. However, justification of the award may accrue by virtue of exceptionally meritorious service in a succession of important positions.

Distinguished Flying Cross

The Distinguished Flying Cross is a medal awarded to any officer or enlisted member of the United States armed forces who distinguishes himself or herself in support of operations by "heroism or extraordinary achievement while participating in an aerial flight, subsequent to November 11, 1918." The decoration may also be given for an act performed prior to that date when the individual has been recommended for, but has not received the Medal of Honor, Distinguished Service Cross, Navy Cross, Air Force Cross or Distinguished Service Medal.

Soldier's Medal:

Bronze Star and Valor Device

The Bronze Star Medal was established by Executive Order 9419, 4 February 1944 (superseded by Executive Order 11046, 24 August 1962, as amended by Executive Order 13286, 28 February 2003).

The Bronze Star Medal may be awarded by the Secretary of a military department or the Secretary of Homeland Security with regard to the Coast Guard when not operating as a service in the Navy, or by such military commanders, or other appropriate officers as the Secretary concerned may designate, to any person who, while serving in any capacity in or with the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, or Coast Guard of the United States, after December 6, 1941, distinguishes, or has distinguished, himself by heroic or meritorious achievement or service, not involving participation in aerial flight—

(a) while engaged in an action against an enemy of the United States;

(b) while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force; or

(c) while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party.

The Bronze Star with the Valor Device is the United States military's fourth highest award for valor.

The Valor device (or “V device”) is authorized by all services and identifies the award as resulting from an act of combat heroism (as in the case of the Army and Air Force) or signifying that the medal was earned in combat (as in the case of the Navy), thus distinguishing it from meritorious achievement awards. However, an accumulation of minor acts of combat heroism does not justify an award of the Valor device. the bronze star is awarded for valor, achievement and service. Combat service deserving a bronze star, but not achieved in a particular valorous act, would warrant a meritorious (acheivemenet) bronze star. The Valor device does not denote an additional award. Only one may be worn on any ribbon.

Purple Heart Medal

The Purple Heart is a United States military decoration awarded in the name of the President to those who have been wounded or killed while serving on or after April 5, 1917 with the U.S. military. The National Purple Heart Hall of Honor is located in New Windsor, New York. With its forerunner, the Badge of Military Merit, which took the form of a heart made of purple cloth, the Purple Heart is the oldest award that is still given to members of the U.S. military, the only earlier award being the obsolete Fidelity Medallion.

Civil War Army & Navy Civil War Campaign Medals

FRANKS, WILLIAM J.

Rank and Organization: Seaman, U.S. Navy.

Born: 1830, Pittsboro, Chatham Co, North Carolina

Entered Service At: Duvalls Bluff, Prairie Co., Arkansas.

General Order No. 32, 16 April 1864.

Citation: Served on board the U.S.S. Marmora off Yazoo City, Mississippi, 5 March 1864. Embarking from the Marmora with a 12-pound howitzer mounted on a field carriage, Franks landed with the gun and crew in the midst of heated battle and, bravely standing by his gun despite enemy rifle fire which cut the gun carriage and rammer contributed to the turning back of the enemy during the fierce engagement.

(Date of death 18 April 1880; Place of burial: Maple Springs Cemetery; Independence Co, Arkansas)

SANDERSON, AARON

Rank and organization: Landsman, U.S. Navy.

Entered service at: Philadelphia, Philadelphia Co., Pennsylvania.

Birth: North Carolina.

General Order No. 59, 22 June 1865.

Citation: Served on board the U.S.S. Wyandank during a boat expedition up Mattox Creek, 17 March 1865. Participating with a boat crew in the clearing of Mattox Creek, L/man Anderson carried out his duties courageously in the face of a devastating fire which cut away half the oars, pierced the launch in many places and cut the barrel off a musket being fired at the enemy.

(Date of death unknown)

US Navy poster featuring Landsman Aaron Anderson

*See Aaron Sanderson (aka Anderson) at wikipedia.org

SHEA, JOSEPH H.

Rank and Organization: Private, Company K, 92d New York Infantry.

Place and Date: At Chapins Farm, Va., 29 September 1864.

Birth: Baltimore, Md.

Date Of Issue: March 1866.

Citation: Gallantry in bringing wounded from the field under heavy fire.

Accredited to: New Bern, Craven Co., North Carolina

STODDARD, JAMES

Rank and organization: Seaman, U.S. Navy.

Born: 1838, North Carolina.

Accredited to: North Carolina.

General Order No. 32, 16 April 1864.

USS Marmora (1862)

Citation: Off Yazoo City, Miss., 5 March 1864. Embarking from the Marmora with a 12_pound howitzer mounted on a field carriage, Stoddard landed with the gun and crew in the midst of heated battle and, bravely standing by his gun despite enemy rifle fire which cut the gun carriage and rammer, contributed to the turning back of the enemy during the fierce engagement.

TROGDEN, HOWELL G.

Rank and Organization: Private, Company B, 8th Missouri Infantry.

Place and Date: At Vicksburg, Miss., 22 May 1863.

Siege of Vicksburg, by Kurz and Allison

Entered Service At: St. Louis, Mo.

Born: 1840, Cedar Falls, Randolph Co., North Carolina

Date Of Issue: 3 August 1894.

Citation: Gallantry in the charge of the "volunteer storming party." He carried his regiment's flag and tried to borrow a gun to defend it.

(Date of death unknown; Place of burial: Calvary Cemetery; Los Angeles, Los Angeles Co, California)

Indian Wars

BROWN, LORENZO D.

Rank and Organization: Private, Company A, 7th U.S. Infantry.

Big Hole, Montana Battlefield

Place and Date: At Big Hole, Beaverhead Co., Montana 9 August 1877.

Entered Service At: Indianapolis, Marion Co., Indiana.

Birth: Davidson County, North Carolina

Date of Issue: 8 May 1878.

Citation: After having been severely wounded in right shoulder, continued to do duty in a most courageous manner.

(Died 17 Apr 1906;)

JONES, WILLIAM H.

Rank and Organization: Farrier, Company L, 2d U.S. Cavalry.

Place and Date: At Little Muddy Creek, Montana., 7 May 1877- at Camas Meadows, Nez Perces Co., Idaho, 20 August 1877.

Entered Service At: Louisville, Jefferson Co., Kentucky.

Birth: Davidson Co., North Carolina

Date of Issue: 28 February 1878. Farrier, Company L, 2d U.S. Cavalry.

Citation: Gallantry in the attack against hostile Sioux Indians on May 7, 1877 at Muddy Creek, Montana, and in the engagement with Nez Perces Indians at Camas Meadows, Idaho, on 20 August 1877 in which he sustained a painful knee wound.

(Died 23 Dec 1911, Place of burial: Efland Methodist Church Cemetery; Efland, Orange Co, North Carolina)

McBRYAR, WILLIAM

Rank and Organization: Sergeant, Company K, 10th U.S. Cavalry.

Place and Date: Arizona, 7 March 1890.

Entered Service At: New York, New York Co., New York.

Birth: 14 February 1861, Elizabethtown, Catawba Co, North Carolina

Date of Issue: 15 May 1890. Sergeant, Company K, 10th U.S. Cavalry.

Place and Date: Arizona, 7 March 1890.

Citation: Distinguished himself for coolness, bravery and marksmanship while his troop was in pursuit of hostile Apache Indians.

(Died 8 Mar 1941, Place of burial: Arlington National Cemetery; Arlington, Virginia)

Spanish-American War

 

*BARROW, DAVID D.

Rank and Organization: Seaman, U.S. Navy.

Born: 22 October 1877, Reelsboro, Pamlico Co., North Carolina

Entered Service At: Norfolk, St. Lawrence Co., Virginia

General Order No. 521, 7 July 1899.

USS Nashville (PG-7) at the Norfolk Navy Yard, Virginia, 8 January 1898

Citation: On board the U.S.S. Nashville during the cutting of the cable leading from Cienfuegos, Cuba, 11 May 1898. Facing the heavy fire of the enemy, Barrow set an example of extraordinary bravery and coolness throughout this action.

(*Died 6 Dec 1948; Place of burial: Evergreen Memorial Park - text; Portsmouth, Norfolk Co.,Virginia; Evergreen Memorial Park - photo)

*See: BARRON, David Duffy: b. 26 Jul 1876, d. 6 Dec 1948, bur. 9 Dec 1948

PARKER, POMEROY

Rank and organization: Private, U.S. Marine Corps.

Born: 17 March 1874, Gates Co., North Carolina

Accredited to: North Carolina.

General Order No. 521, 7 July 1899.

Depiction of American boats cutting the cable at Cienfuegos

Citation: On board the U.S.S. Nashville during the operation of cutting the cable leading from Cienfuegos, Cuba, 11 May 1898. Facing the heavy fire of the enemy, Parker displayed extraordinary bravery and coolness throughout this action.

(Died 30 Dec 1946; Place of burial: Roxobel-Kelford Cemetery; Roxobel, Bertie Co. North Carolina)

Philippine Insurrection Navy version

JOHNSTON, GORDON

Rank and Organization: First Lieutenant, U.S. Signal Corps.

Place and Date: At Mount Bud Dajo, Jolo, Philippine Islands, 7 March 1906.

Entered Service At: Birmingham, Jefferson Co., Alabama

Born: 25 May 1874, Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co., North Carolina

Date of Issue: 7 November 1910.

General Order No. 207.

Other Military Awards:

Distinguished Service Cross
Distinguished Service Medal
Silver Star (3)
Purple Heart
Officer of the Legion of Honor (France)

Citation: Voluntarily took part in and was dangerously wounded during an assault on the enemy's works.

(Died 8 Mar 1934; Place of burial: Arlington National Cemetery; Arlington, Virginia)

RAY, CHARLES W.

Rank and Organization: Sergeant, Company 1, 22d U.S. Infantry.

Place and Date: Near San Isidro, Luzon, Philippine Islands, 19 October 1899.

Entered Service At: St. Louis, St. Louis Co., Missouri.

Birth: Pensacola, Yancey Co., North Carolina

Date of Issue: 18 April 1902.

Citation: Most distinguished gallantry in action. Captured a bridge with the detachment he commanded and held it against a superior force of the enemy, thereby enabling an army to come up and cross.

(Died 23 Mar 1959; Place of burial: Grandfield Memorial Cemetery; Grandfield, Tillman Co., Oklahoma)

Mexican Campaign, VeracruzArmy (left) & Navy (right)

ANDERSON, EDWIN ALEXANDER

Rank and organization: Captain, U.S. Navy.

Born: 16 July 1860, Wilmington, New Hanover Co., North Carolina

Accredited to: North Carolina.

General Order No. 177, 4 December 1915.

Other Military award: Distinguished Service Medal.

Citation: For extraordinary heroism in battle, engagement of Vera Cruz, 22 April 1914, in command of the 2d Seaman Regiment. Marching his regiment across the open space in front of the Naval Academy and other buildings, Capt. Anderson unexpectedly met a heavy fire from riflemen, machineguns and l_pounders, which caused part of his command to break and fall back, many casualties occurring amongst them at the time. His indifference to the heavy fire, to which he himself was exposed at the head of his regiment, showed him to be fearless and courageous in battle.

(Died 23 Sep 1933; Place of burial Arlington National Cemetery; Arlington, Virginia)

JOHNSTON, RUFUS ZENAS

Rank and organization: Lieutenant Commander, U.S. Navy.

Born: 7 June 1874, Lincolnton, Lincoln Co, North Carolina

Accredited to: North Carolina.

General Order No. 177, 4 December 1915.

Other Military award: Navy Cross.

Citation: For distinguished conduct in battle, engagement of Vera Cruz, 22 April 1914; was regimental adjutant, and eminent and conspicuous in his conduct. He exhibited courage and skill in leading his men through the action of the 22d and in the final occupation of the city.

(Died 4 July 1959; Place of burial Arlington National Cemetery; Arlington, Virginia)

STATON, ADOLPHUS

Rank and organization: Lieutenant, U.S. Navy.

Place and date: Vera Cruz, Mexico, 22 April 1914.

Entered service at: North Carolina.

Born: 28 August 1879, Tarboro, Edgecombe Co., North Carolina

Other Military Awards: *World War I - Navy Cross

Citation: For distinguished conduct in battle, engagement of VeraCruz, 22 April 1914; was eminent and conspicuous in command of his battalion. He exhibited courage and skill in leading his men through the action of the 22d and in the final occupation of the city.

American ships at Veracruz.

*Note: Adolphus Staton was awarded the Medal of Honor during the Mexican Campaign and the Navy Cross in World War I.

(Died 4 Jun 1964; Place of burial Arlington National Cemetery; Arlington, Virginia)

World War I

BLACKWELL, ROBERT LESTER

Rank and Organization: Private, U.S. Army, Company K, 119th Infantry, 30th Division.

Place and Date: Near St. Souplet, France, 11 October 1918.

Entered Service At: Hurdle Mills, Person Co., North Carolina

Birth: Person Co., North Carolina

G. O. No.: 13, W.D., 1919.

Other Military awards:

Croce di Guerra al Valor Militare (Italy)
Croix de Guerre (France)


Citation: When his platoon was almost surrounded by the enemy and his platoon commander asked for volunteers to carry a message calling for reinforcements, Pvt. Blackwell volunteered for this mission, well knowing the extreme danger connected with it. In attempting to get through the heavy shell and machinegun fire this gallant soldier was killed.

(Died 11 Oct 1918; Place of burial Somme American Cemetery and Memorial Somme Picardie, France)

PARKER, SAMUEL IREDELL

Rank and Organization: Second Lieutenant, *U.S. Army, Company K, 28th Infantry, 1st Division.

Place and Date: Near Soissons, France, 18-19 July 1918.

*On 29 June 1917, the men of Company K became the first American combat unit to set foot on European soil at St. Nazair, France.

Entered Service At: Monroe, Union Co, North Carolina

Birth: Monroe, Union Co, North Carolina

G. O. No.: 1, W.D. 1937.

Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty. During the attack the 2d and 3d Battalions of the 28th Infantry were merged, and after several hours of severe fighting, successfully established a frontline position. In so doing, a gap was left between the right flank of the French 153d Division on their left and the left flank of the 28th Infantry, exposing the left flank to a terrific enfilade fire from several enemy machineguns located in a rock quarry on high ground. 2d Lt. Parker, observing this serious situation, ordered his depleted platoon to follow him in an attack upon the strong point. Meeting a disorganized group of French Colonials wandering leaderlessly about, he persuaded them to join his platoon. This consolidated group followed 2d Lt. Parker through direct enemy rifle and machinegun fire to the crest of the hill, and rushing forward, took the quarry by storm, capturing 6 machineguns and about 40 prisoners. The next day when the assault was continued, 2d Lt. Parker in command of the merged 2d and 3d Battalions was in support of the 1st Battalion. Although painfully wounded in the foot, he refused to be evacuated and continued to lead his command until the objective was reached. Seeing that the assault battalion was subjected to heavy enfilade fire due to a gap between it and the French on its left, 2d Lt. Parker led his battalion through this heavy fire up on the line to the left of the 1st Battalion and thereby closed the gap, remaining in command of his battalion until the newly established lines of the 28th Infantry were thoroughly consolidated. In supervising the consolidation of the new position, 2d Lt. Parker was compelled to crawl about on his hands and knees on account of his painful wound. His conspicuous gallantry and spirit of self-sacrifice were a source of great inspiration to the members of the entire command.

(Died 1 Dec 1975; Place of burial: Oakwood Cemetery, Concord, Cabarrus Co., North Carolina)

World War II

EUBANKS, RAY E.

Rank and organization: Sergeant, U.S. Army, Company D, 503d Parachute Infantry.

Place and date: At Noemfoor Island, Dutch New Guinea, 23 July 1944.

Entered service at: LaGrange, Lenoir Co., North Carolina

Born: 6 February 1922, Snow Hill, Greene Co., North Carolina

General Order No. 20, 29 March 1945.

Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty at Noemfoor Island, Dutch New Guinea, 23 July 1944. While moving to the relief of a platoon isolated by the enemy, his company encountered a strong enemy position supported by machinegun, rifle, and mortar fire. Sgt. Eubanks was ordered to make an attack with 1 squad to neutralize the enemy by fire in order to assist the advance of his company. He maneuvered his squad to within 30 yards of the enemy where heavy fire checked his advance. Directing his men to maintain their fire, he and 2 scouts worked their way forward up a shallow depression to within 25 yards of the enemy. Directing the scouts to remain in place, Sgt. Eubanks armed himself with an automatic rifle and worked himself forward over terrain swept by intense fire to within 15 yards of the enemy position when he opened fire with telling effect. The enemy, having located his position, concentrated their fire with the result that he was wounded and a bullet rendered his rifle useless. In spite of his painful wounds he immediately charged the enemy and using his weapon as a club killed 4 of the enemy before he was himself again hit and killed. Sgt. Eubanks' heroic action, courage, and example in leadership so inspired his men that their advance was successful. They killed 45 of the enemy and drove the remainder from the position, thus effecting the relief of our beleaguered troops.

(Died 23 Jul 1944; Place of burial Westview Cemetery, Kinston, Lenoir Co., North Carolina)

HALYBURTON, WILLIAM DAVID, JR.

Rank and organization: Pharmacist's Mate Second Class, U.S. Naval Reserve.

Born: 2 August 1924, Canton, Haywood Co, North Carolina

Accredited to: North Carolina.

Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving with a Marine Rifle Company in the 2d Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division, during action against enemy Japanese forces on Okinawa Shima in the Ryukyu Chain, 10 May 1945. Undaunted by the deadly accuracy of Japanese counterfire as his unit pushed the attack through a strategically important draw, Halyburton unhesitatingly dashed across the draw and up the hill into an open fire-swept field where the company advance squad was suddenly pinned down under a terrific concentration of mortar, machinegun and sniper fire with resultant severe casualties. Moving steadily forward despite the enemy's merciless barrage, he reached the wounded marine who lay farthest away and was rendering first aid when his patient was struck for the second time by a Japanese bullet. Instantly placing himself in the direct line of fire, he shielded the fallen fighter with his own body and staunchly continued his ministrations although constantly menaced by the slashing fury of shrapnel and bullets falling on all sides. Alert, determined and completely unselfish in his concern for the helpless marine, he persevered in his efforts until he himself sustained mortal wounds and collapsed, heroically sacrificing himself that his comrade might live. By his outstanding valor and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of tremendous odds, Halyburton sustained and enhanced the highest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the service of his country.

(Died 10 May 1945; Place of burial National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu, Honolulu Co., Hawaii)

HERRING, RUFUS GEDDIE

Rank and organization: Lieutenant, U.S. Naval Reserve, LCI (G) 449.

Place and date: Iwo Jima, 17 February 1945.

Entered service at: North Carolina.

Born: 11 June 1921, Roseboro, Sampson Co., North Carolina

Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as commanding officer of LCI (G) 449 operating as a unit of LCI (G) Group 8, during the preinvasion attack on Iwo Jima on 17 February 1945. Boldly closing the strongly fortified shores under the devastating fire of Japanese coastal defense guns, Lt. (then Lt. (j.g.)) Herring directed shattering barrages of 40mm. and 20mm. gunfire against hostile beaches until struck down by the enemy's savage counterfire which blasted the 449's heavy guns and whipped her decks into sheets of flame. Regaining consciousness despite profuse bleeding he was again critically wounded when a Japanese mortar crashed the conning station, instantly killing or fatally wounding most of the officers and leaving the ship wallowing without navigational control. Upon recovering the second time, Lt. Herring resolutely climbed down to the pilothouse and, fighting against his rapidly waning strength, took over the helm, established communication with the engineroom, and carried on valiantly until relief could be obtained. When no longer able to stand, he propped himself against empty shell cases and rallied his men to the aid of the wounded; he maintained position in the firing line with his 20mm. guns in action in the face of sustained enemy fire, and conned his crippled ship to safety. His unwavering fortitude, aggressive perseverance, and indomitable spirit against terrific odds reflect the highest credit upon Lt. Herring and uphold the highest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service.

(Died 31 Jan 1996; Place of burial Roseboro Cemetery; Roseboro, Sampson Co., North Carolina)

LUCAS, JACKLYN HAROLD

Rank and organization: Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 1st Battalion, 26th Marines, 5th Marine Division.

Place and date: Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, 20 February 1945.

Entered service at: Norfolk, St. Lawrence Co., Virginia.

Born: 14 February 1928, Plymouth, Washington Co., North Carolina

Other Military Awards:

Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving with the 1st Battalion, 26th Marines, 5th Marine Division, during action against enemy Japanese forces on Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, 20 February 1945. While creeping through a treacherous, twisting ravine which ran in close proximity to a fluid and uncertain frontline on D-plus- 1 day, Pfc. Lucas and 3 other men were suddenly ambushed by a hostile patrol which savagely attacked with rifle fire and grenades. Quick to act when the lives of the small group were endangered by 2 grenades which landed directly in front of them, Pfc. Lucas unhesitatingly hurled himself over his comrades upon 1 grenade and pulled the other under him, absorbing the whole blasting forces of the explosions in his own body in order to shield his companions from the concussion and murderous flying fragments. By his inspiring action and valiant spirit of self-sacrifice, he not only protected his comrades from certain injury or possible death but also enabled them to rout the Japanese patrol and continue the advance. His exceptionally courageous initiative and loyalty reflect the highest credit upon Pfc. Lucas and the U.S. Naval Service.

*World War II hero JACK LUCAS received the Medal of Honor for heroic sacrifice at Iwo Jima just 5 days after his 17th birthday...becoming the youngest American in this century to receive the award. At the time of his heroism he had already been in the Marine Corps for 3 years!

(Died 5 Jun 2008; Place of burial: Highland Cemetery; Hattiesburg, Forrest Co., Mississippi ; Place of death: Forrest General Hospital in Hattiesburg, Mississippi - Obit)

MURRAY, CHARLES "CHUCK" PATRICK, JR.

Rank and organization: First Lieutenant, U.S. Army, Company C, 30th Infantry, 3d Infantry Division.

Place and date: Near Kaysersberg, France, 16 December 1944.

Entered service at: Wilmington, New Hanover Co, North Carolina

Birth: Baltimore, Md. (born September 26, 1921)

General Order No. 63, 1 August 1945.

Other Military awards:

Silver Star
Legion of Merit
Bronze Star with Valor Device

Citation: For commanding Company C, 30th Infantry, displaying supreme courage and heroic initiative near Kaysersberg, France, on 16 December 1944, while leading a reinforced platoon into enemy territory. Descending into a valley beneath hilltop positions held by our troops, he observed a force of 200 Germans pouring deadly mortar, bazooka, machinegun, and small arms fire into an American battalion occupying the crest of the ridge. The enemy's position in a sunken road, though hidden from the ridge, was open to a flank attack by 1st Lt. Murray's patrol but he hesitated to commit so small a force to battle with the superior and strongly disposed enemy. Crawling out ahead of his troops to a vantage point, he called by radio for artillery fire. His shells bracketed the German force, but when he was about to correct the range his radio went dead. He returned to his patrol, secured grenades and a rifle to launch them and went back to his self-appointed outpost. His first shots disclosed his position; the enemy directed heavy fire against him as he methodically fired his missiles into the narrow defile. Again he returned to his patrol. With an automatic rifle and ammunition, he once more moved to his exposed position. Burst after burst he fired into the enemy, killing 20, wounding many others, and completely disorganizing its ranks, which began to withdraw. He prevented the removal of 3 German mortars by knocking out a truck. By that time a mortar had been brought to his support. 1st Lt. Murray directed fire of this weapon, causing further casualties and confusion in the German ranks. Calling on his patrol to follow, he then moved out toward his original objective, possession of a bridge and construction of a roadblock. He captured 10 Germans in foxholes. An eleventh, while pretending to surrender, threw a grenade which knocked him to the ground, inflicting 8 wounds. Though suffering and bleeding profusely, he refused to return to the rear until he had chosen the spot for the block and had seen his men correctly deployed. By his single-handed attack on an overwhelming force and by his intrepid and heroic fighting, 1st Lt. Murray stopped a counterattack, established an advance position against formidable odds, and provided an inspiring example for the men of his command.

Charles Patrick Murray, Jr. died 15 Aug 2011.

Murray, Charles Patrick, III (son of Charles Patrick "Chuck" Murray, Jr.)

THOMPSON, MAX

Rank and Organization: Sergeant, U.S. Army, Company K, 18th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division.

Place and Date Near Haaren, Germany, 18 October 1944.

Entered Service at: Prescott, Yavapai Co., Arizona

Birth: Bethel, North Carolina

General Order No. 47, 18 June 1945.

Citation: On 18 October 1944, Company K, 18th Infantry, occupying a position on a hill near Haaren, Germany, was attacked by an enemy infantry battalion supported by tanks. The assault was preceded by an artillery concentration, lasting an hour, which inflicted heavy casualties on the company. While engaged in moving wounded men to cover, Sgt. Thompson observed that the enemy had overrun the positions of the 3d Platoon. He immediately attempted to stem the enemy's advance single-handedly. He manned an abandoned machinegun and fired on the enemy until a direct hit from a hostile tank destroyed the gun. Shaken and dazed, Sgt. Thompson picked up an automatic rifle and although alone against the enemy force which was pouring into the gap in our lines, he ??fired burst after burst, halting the leading elements of the attack and dispersing those following. Throwing aside his automatic rifle, which had jammed, he took up a rocket gun, fired on a light tank, setting it on fire. By evening the enemy had been driven from the greater part of the captured position but still held 3 pillboxes. Sgt. Thompson's squad was assigned the task of dislodging the enemy from these emplacements. Darkness having fallen and finding that fire of his squad was ineffective from a distance, Sgt. Thompson crawled forward alone to within 20 yards of 1 of the pillboxes and fired grenades into it. The Germans holding the emplacement concentrated their fire upon him. Though wounded, he held his position fearlessly, continued his grenade fire, and finally forced the enemy to abandon the blockhouse. Sgt. Thompson's courageous leadership inspired his men and materially contributed to the clearing of the enemy from his last remaining hold on this important hill position.

(Place of burial: Forest Lawn Cemetery; Enka, Buncombe Co, North Carolina)

URBAN, MATT LOUIS

Rank and organization: Lieutenant Colonel (then Captain), 2d Battalion, 60th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division, World War II.

Place and date: Renouf, France, 14 June to 3 September 1944.

Entered service at: Fort Bragg, Cumberland Co, North Carolina, 2 July 1941.

Date and place of birth: 25 August 1919, Buffalo, New York.

Other Military Awards:

Silver Star (2)
Legion of Merit
Bronze Star (3)
Purple Heart (7)
Croix de guerre (France)


Citation: Lieutenant Colonel (then Captain) Matt Urban, l 12-22-2414, United States Army, who distinguished himself by a series of bold, heroic actions, exemplified by singularly outstanding combat leadership, personal bravery, and tenacious devotion to duty, during the period 14 June to 3 September 1944 while assigned to the 2d Battalion, 60th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division. On 14 June, Captain Urban's company, attacking at Renouf, France, encountered heavy enemy small arms and tank fire. The enemy tanks were unmercifully raking his unit's positions and inflicting heavy casualties. Captain Urban, realizing that his company was in imminent danger of being decimated, armed himself with a bazooka. He worked his way with an ammo carrier through hedgerows, under a continuing barrage of fire, to a point near the tanks. He brazenly exposed himself to the enemy fire and, firing the bazooka, destroyed both tanks. Responding to Captain Urban's action, his company moved forward and routed the enemy. Later that same day, still in the attack near Orglandes, Captain Urban was wounded in the leg by direct fire from a 37mm tank-gun. He refused evacuation and continued to lead his company until they moved into defensive positions for the night. At 0500 hours the next day, still in the attack near Orglandes, Captain Urban, though badly wounded, directed his company in another attack. One hour later he was again wounded. Suffering from two wounds, one serious, he was evacuated to England.
In mid-July, while recovering from his wounds, he learned of his unit's severe losses in the hedgerows of Normandy. Realizing his unit's need for battle-tested leaders, he voluntarily left the hospital and hitchhiked his way back to his unit hear St. Lo, France. Arriving at the 2d Battalion Command Post at 1130 hours, 25 July, he found that his unit had jumped-off at 1100 hours in the first attack of Operation Cobra." Still limping from his leg wound, Captain Urban made his way forward to retake command of his company. He found his company held up by strong enemy opposition. Two supporting tanks had been destroyed and another, intact but with no tank commander or gunner, was not moving. He located a lieutenant in charge of the support tanks and directed a plan of attack to eliminate the enemy strong-point. The lieutenant and a sergeant were immediately killed by the heavy enemy fire when they tried to mount the tank. Captain Urban, though physically hampered by his leg wound and knowing quick action had to be taken, dashed through the scathing fire and mounted the tank. With enemy bullets ricocheting from the tank, Captain Urban ordered the tank forward and, completely exposed to the enemy fire, manned the machine gun and placed devastating fire on the enemy. His action, in the face of enemy fire, galvanized the battalion into action and they attacked and destroyed the enemy position. On 2 August, Captain Urban was wounded in the chest by shell fragments and, disregarding the recommendation of the Battalion Surgeon, again refused evacuation. On 6 August, Captain Urban became the commander of the 2d Battalion. On 15 August, he was again wounded but remained with his unit. On 3 September, the 2d Battalion was given the mission of establishing a crossing-point on the Meuse River near Heer, Belgium. The enemy planned to stop the advance of the allied Army by concentrating heavy forces at the Meuse. The 2d Battalion, attacking toward the crossing-point, encountered fierce enemy artillery, small arms and mortar fire which stopped the attack. Captain Urban quickly moved from his command post to the lead position of the battalion. Reorganizing the attacking elements, he personally led a charge toward the enemy's strong-point. As the charge moved across the open terrain, Captain Urban was seriously wounded in the neck. Although unable to talk above a whisper from the paralyzing neck wound, and in danger of losing his life, he refused to be evacuated until the enemy was routed and his battalion had secured the crossing-point on the Meuse River. Captain Urban's personal leadership, limitless bravery, and repeated extraordinary exposure to enemy fire served as an inspiration to his entire battalion. His valorous and intrepid actions reflect the utmost credit on him and uphold the noble traditions of the United States.

(died 4 Mar 1995; Place of burial Arlington National Cemetery; Arlington, Virginia) Home of the Heroes: Arlington Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia

WARNER, HENRY F.

Rank and Organization: Corporal, U.S. Army, Antitank Company, 2d Battalion, 26th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division.

Place and Date Near Dom Butgenbach, Belgium, 20-21 December 1944.

Entered Service at: Troy, Montgomery Co, North Carolina

Born: 23 August 1923, Troy, Montgomery Co, North Carolina

General Order No. 48, 23 June 1945.

Other Military Awards:

Citation: Serving as 57-mm. antitank gunner with the 2d Battalion, he was a major factor in stopping enemy tanks during heavy attacks against the battalion position near Dom Butgenbach, Belgium, on 20-21 December 1944. In the first attack, launched in the early morning of the 20th, enemy tanks succeeded in penetrating parts of the line. Cpl. Warner, disregarding the concentrated cannon and machinegun fire from 2 tanks bearing down on him, and ignoring the imminent danger of being overrun by the infantry moving under tank cover, destroyed the first tank and scored a direct and deadly hit upon the second. A third tank approached to within 5 yards of his position while he was attempting to clear a jammed breach lock. Jumping from his gun pit, he engaged in a pistol duel with the tank commander standing in the turret, killing him and forcing the tank to withdraw. Following a day and night during which our forces were subjected to constant shelling, mortar barrages, and numerous unsuccessful infantry attacks, the enemy struck in great force on the early morning of the 21st. Seeing a Mark IV tank looming out of the mist and heading toward his position, Cpl. Warner scored a direct hit. Disregarding his injuries, he endeavored to finish the loading and again fire at the tank whose motor was now aflame, when a second machinegun burst killed him. Cpl. Warner's gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of life above and beyond the call of duty contributed materially to the successful defense against the enemy attacks.

(21 Dec 1944; Place of burial Southside Cemetery; Troy, Montgomery Co, North Carolina)

World War II ~ Iwo Jima

Reunion of honor

On February 19, 1985,the 40th anniversary of the day that U.S. forces began the assault on the island, veterans from both forces gathered for the Reunion of Honor just a few meters away from the spot where U.S. Marines had landed on the island. During the memorial service a granite plaque was unveiled with the message:

On the 40th anniversary of the battle of Iwo Jima, American and Japanese veterans met again on these same sands, this time in peace and friendship. We commemorate our comrades, living and dead, who fought here with bravery and honor, and we pray together that our sacrifices on Iwo Jima will always be remembered and never be repeated.

It is inscribed on both sides of the plaque, with the English translation facing the beaches where U.S. forces landed and the Japanese translation facing inland, where Japanese troops defended their position.

After that, the Japan-U.S. combination memorial service of the 50th anniversary was held in front of this monument in March 1995. The 55th anniversary was held in 2000, followed by a 60th reunion in March 2005

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Korean War

Crump, Jerry Kirt

Rank: Corporal

Organization: U.S. Army, Company L, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division.

Place and date: Near Chorwon, Korea, Sept. 6-7, 1951.

Entered service at: Forest City, Rutherford Co, North Carolina

Born: 1933, Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co, North Carolina

Other Military awards: Purple Heart

General Order No.: 68, July 11, 1952.

Citation: Corporal Jerry K. Crump, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company L, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and outstanding courage above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy on 6 and 7 September 1951, near Chorwon, Korea. During the night a numerically superior hostile force launched an assault against his platoon on Hill 284, overrunning friendly positions and swarming into the sector. Corporal Crump repeatedly exposed himself to deliver effective fire into the ranks of the assailants, inflicting numerous casualties. Observing two enemy soldiers endeavoring to capture a friendly machinegun, he charged and killed both with his bayonet, regaining control of the weapon. Returning to his position, now occupied by four of his wounded comrades, he continued his accurate fire into enemy troops surrounding his emplacement. When a hostile soldier hurled a grenade into the position, Corporal Crump immediately flung himself over the missile, absorbing the blast with his body and saving his comrades from death or serious injury. His aggressive actions had so inspired his comrades that a spirited counterattack drove the enemy from the perimeter. Corporal Crump's heroic devotion to duty, indomitable fighting spirit, and willingness to sacrifice himself to save his comrades reflect the highest credit upon himself, the infantry and the U.S. Army.

(Died 10 Jan 1977; Place of Burial: Mount Zion United Methodist Church Cemetery; Cornelius, North Carolina)

George, Charles

Rank: Private First Class

Organization: U.S. Army, Company C, 179th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division.

Place and date: Near Songnae-dong, Korea, Nov. 30, 1952.

Entered service at: Whittier, Swain Co., North Carolina

Birth: 1932, Cherokee, Swain Co., North Carolina

Killed in action: Nov. 30, 1952

Other Military Awards: Purple Heart

General Order No. 19, March 18, 1954.

Citation:Private First Class Charles George, Infantry, United States Army, a member of Company C 179th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and outstanding courage above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy on the night of 30 November 1952, near Songnae-dong, Korea. He was a member of a raiding party committed to engage the enemy and capture a prisoner for interrogation. Forging up the rugged slope of the key terrain feature, the group was subjected to intense mortar and machinegun fire and suffered several casualties. Throughout the advance, he fought valiantly and, upon reaching the crest of the hill, leaped into the trenches and closed with the enemy in hand-to-hand combat. When friendly troops were ordered to move back upon completion of the assignment, he and two comrades remained to cover the withdrawal. While in the process of leaving the trenches a hostile soldier hurled a grenade into their midst. Pfc. George shouted a warning to one comrade, pushed the other soldier out of danger, and, with full knowledge of the consequences, unhesitatingly threw himself upon the grenade, absorbing the full blast of the explosion. Although seriously wounded in this display of valor, he refrained from any outcry which would divulge the position of his companions. The two soldiers evacuated him to the forward aid station and shortly thereafter he succumbed to his wound. Private George's indomitable courage, consummate devotion to duty, and willing self-sacrifice reflect the highest credit upon himself and uphold the finest traditions of the military service.

(Died 30 Nov 1952; Place of burial: Yellow Hill Cemetery; Cherokee, Swain Co., North Carolina)

Womack, Bryant Homer.

Rank: Private First Class
Organization: U.S. Army, Medical Company, 14th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division.

Place and date: Near Sokso-ri, Korea, March 12, 1952.

Entered service at: Mill Springs, Polk Co., North Carolina

Birth: Mill Springs, Polk Co., North Carolina

Other Military Awards: Purple Heart

General Order No.: 5, Jan. 12, 1953.

Citation: Private First Class Bryant E. Womack, Army Medical Service, Medical Company, 14th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy on 12 March 1952 near Sokso-ri, Korea. Private Womack was the only medical aid man attached to a night combat patrol when sudden contact with a numerically superior enemy produced numerous casualties. Private Womack went immediately to their aid, although this necessitated exposing himself to a devastating hail of enemy fire, during which he was seriously wounded. Refusing medical aid for himself, he continued moving among his comrades to administer aid. While he was aiding one man, he was again struck by enemy mortar fire, this time suffering the loss of his right arm. Although he knew the consequences should immediate aid not be administered, he still refused aid and insisted that all efforts be made for the benefit of others that were wounded. Although unable to perform the task himself, he remained on the scene and directed others in first aid techniques. The last man to withdraw, he walked until he collapsed from loss of blood, and died a few minutes later while being carried by his comrades. The extraordinary heroism, outstanding courage, and unswerving devotion to his duties displayed by Private Womack reflect the utmost distinction upon himself and uphold the esteemed traditions of the U.S. Army.

(Died 12 Mar 1952; Place of burial: Lebanon Methodist Church; Mill Spring, Polk Co., North Carolina)

Vietnam

ASHLEY, EUGENE, JR.

Rank and organization: Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army, Company C, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces.

Place and date: Near Lang Vei, Republic of Vietnam, 6th and 7th February 1968.

Entered service at: New York, New York Co., New York.

Born: 12 October 1931, Wilmington, New Hanover Co., North Carolina

Other Military Awards: Purple Heart

Citation: Sfc. Ashley, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Detachment A-101, Company C. Sfc. Ashley was the senior special forces Advisor of a hastily organized assault force whose mission was to rescue entrapped U.S. special forces advisors at Camp Lang Vei. During the initial attack on the special forces camp by North Vietnamese army forces, Sfc. Ashley supported the camp with high explosive and illumination mortar rounds. When communications were lost with the main camp, he assumed the additional responsibility of directing air strikes and artillery support. Sfc. Ashley organized and equipped a small assault force composed of local friendly personnel. During the ensuing battle, Sfc. Ashley led a total of 5 vigorous assaults against the enemy, continuously exposing himself to a voluminous hail of enemy grenades, machinegun and automatic weapons fire. Throughout these assaults, he was plagued by numerous booby-trapped satchel charges in all bunkers on his avenue of approach. During his fifth and final assault, he adjusted air strikes nearly on top of his assault element, forcing the enemy to withdraw and resulting in friendly control of the summit of the hill. While exposing himself to intense enemy fire, he was seriously wounded by machinegun fire but continued his mission without regard for his personal safety. After the fifth assault he lost consciousness and was carried from the summit by his comrades only to suffer a fatal wound when an enemy artillery round landed in the area. Sfc. Ashley displayed extraordinary heroism in risking his life in an attempt to save the lives of his entrapped comrades and commanding officer. His total disregard for his personal safety while exposed to enemy observation and automatic weapons fire was an inspiration to all men committed to the assault. The resolute valor with which he led 5 gallant charges placed critical diversionary pressure on the attacking enemy and his valiant efforts carved a channel in the overpowering enemy forces and weapons positions through which the survivors of Camp Lang Vei eventually escaped to freedom. Sfc. Ashley's bravery at the cost of his life was in the highest traditions of the military service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the U.S. Army.

Place of burial Rockfish Memorial Park, Fayetteville, Cumberland Co., North Carolina

DURHAM, HAROLD BASCOM, JR.

Rank and organization: Second Lieutenant, U.S. Army, Battery C, 6th Battalion, 15th Artillery, 1st Infantry Division . Place and date: Republic of Vietnam, 17 October 1967.

Entered service at: Atlanta, Fulton Co., Georgia

Born: 12 October 1942, Rocky Mount, Nash Co., North Carolina

Other Miliary Awards:

Bronze Star
Purple Heart

Citation: 2d Lt. Durham, Artillery, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the cost of his life above and beyond the call of duty while assigned to Battery C. 2d Lt. Durham was serving as a forward observer with Company D, 2d Battalion, 28th Infantry during a battalion reconnaissance-in-force mission. At approximately 1015 hours contact was made with an enemy force concealed in well-camouflaged positions and fortified bunkers. 2d Lt. Durham immediately moved into an exposed position to adjust the supporting artillery fire onto the insurgents. During a brief lull in the battle he administered emergency first aid to the wounded in spite of heavy enemy sniper fire directed toward him. Moments later, as enemy units assaulted friendly positions, he learned that Company A, bearing the brunt of the attack, had lost its forward observer. While he was moving to replace the wounded observer, the enemy detonated a Claymore mine, severely wounding him in the head and impairing his vision. In spite of the intense pain, he continued to direct the supporting artillery fire and to employ his individual weapon in support of the hard pressed infantrymen. As the enemy pressed their attack, 2d Lt. Durham called for supporting fire to be placed almost directly on his position. Twice the insurgents were driven back, leaving many dead and wounded behind. 2d Lt. Durham was then taken to a secondary defensive position. Even in his extremely weakened condition, he continued to call artillery fire onto the enemy. He refused to seek cover and instead positioned himself in a small clearing which offered a better vantage point from which to adjust the fire. Suddenly, he was severely wounded a second time by enemy machinegun fire. As he lay on the ground near death, he saw two Viet Cong approaching, shooting the defenseless wounded men. With his last effort, 2d Lt. Durham shouted a warning to a nearby soldier who immediately killed the insurgents. 2d Lt. Durham died moments later, still grasping the radio handset. 2d Lt. Durham's gallant actions in close combat with an enemy force are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the U.S. Army.

Place of burial Oak Ridge Cemetery, Tifton, Tift Co., Georgia

JOEL, LAWRENCE

Rank and organization: Specialist Sixth Class (then Sp5c), U.S. Army, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade.

Place and date: Republic of Vietnam, 8 November 1965,

Entered service at: New York City, New York Co., New York.

General Order No. 15, 5 April 1967.

Born: 22 February 1928, Winston-Salem, Forsyth Co., North Carolina

Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of life above and beyond the call of duty. Sp6c. Joel demonstrated indomitable courage, determination, and professional skill when a numerically superior and well-concealed Viet Cong element launched a vicious attack which wounded or killed nearly every man in the lead squad of the company. After treating the men wounded by the initial burst of gunfire, he bravely moved forward to assist others who were wounded while proceeding to their objective. While moving from man to man, he was struck in the right leg by machinegun fire. Although painfully wounded his desire to aid his fellow soldiers transcended all personal feeling. He bandaged his own wound and self-administered morphine to deaden the pain enabling him to continue his dangerous undertaking. Through this period of time, he constantly shouted words of encouragement to all around him. Then, completely ignoring the warnings of others, and his pain, he continued his search for wounded, exposing himself to hostile fire; and, as bullets dug up the dirt around him, he held plasma bottles high while kneeling completely engrossed in his life saving mission. Then, after being struck a second time and with a bullet lodged in his thigh, he dragged himself over the battlefield and succeeded in treating 13 more men before his medical supplies ran out. Displaying resourcefulness, he saved the life of 1 man by placing a plastic bag over a severe chest wound to congeal the blood. As 1 of the platoons pursued the Viet Cong, an insurgent force in concealed positions opened fire on the platoon and wounded many more soldiers. With a new stock of medical supplies, Sp6c. Joel again shouted words of encouragement as he crawled through an intense hail of gunfire to the wounded men. After the 24 hour battle subsided and the Viet Cong dead numbered 410, snipers continued to harass the company. Throughout the long battle, Sp6c. Joel never lost sight of his mission as a medical aidman and continued to comfort and treat the wounded until his own evacuation was ordered. His meticulous attention to duty saved a large number of lives and his unselfish, daring example under most adverse conditions was an inspiration to all. Sp6c. Joel's profound concern for his fellow soldiers, at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty are in the highest traditions of the U.S. Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of his country.

Place of burial Arlington National Cemetery; Arlington, Virginia; Home of the Heroes: Arlington Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia

Arlington National Cemetery website (unofficial)

MILLER, FRANKLIN D.

Rank and organization: Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, 5th Special Forces Group, 1st Special Forces.

Place and date: Kontum province, Republic of Vietnam, 5 January 1970.

Entered service at: Albuquerque, Bernalilo Co, New Mexico

Born: 27 January 1945, Elizabeth City, Pasquotank Co, North Carolina

Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. S/Sgt. Miller, 5th Special Forces Group, distinguished himself while serving as team leader of an American-Vietnamese long-range reconnaissance patrol operating deep within enemy controlled territory. Leaving the helicopter insertion point, the patrol moved forward on its mission. Suddenly, 1 of the team members tripped a hostile booby trap which wounded 4 soldiers. S/Sgt. Miller, knowing that the explosion would alert the enemy, quickly administered first aid to the wounded and directed the team into positions across a small stream bed at the base of a steep hill. Within a few minutes, S/Sgt. Miller saw the lead element of what he estimated to be a platoon-size enemy force moving toward his location. Concerned for the safety of his men, he directed the small team to move up the hill to a more secure position. He remained alone, separated from the patrol, to meet the attack. S/Sgt. Miller single-handedly repulsed 2 determined attacks by the numerically superior enemy force and caused them to withdraw in disorder. He rejoined his team, established contact with a forward air controller and arranged the evacuation of his patrol. However, the only suitable extraction location in the heavy jungle was a bomb crater some 150 meters from the team location. S/Sgt. Miller reconnoitered the route to the crater and led his men through the enemy controlled jungle to the extraction site. As the evacuation helicopter hovered over the crater to pick up the patrol, the enemy launched a savage automatic weapon and rocket-propelled grenade attack against the beleaguered team, driving off the rescue helicopter. S/Sgt. Miller led the team in a valiant defense which drove back the enemy in its attempt to overrun the small patrol. Although seriously wounded and with every man in his patrol a casualty, S/Sgt. Miller moved forward to again single-handedly meet the hostile attackers. From his forward exposed position, S/Sgt. Miller gallantly repelled 2 attacks by the enemy before a friendly relief force reached the patrol location. S/Sgt. Miller's gallantry, intrepidity in action, and selfless devotion to the welfare of his comrades are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on him, his unit, and the U.S. Army.

He was cremated and his ashes were scattered in New Mexico;

In memory:Florida National Cemetery, Bushnell, Sumter County, Florida

PATTERSON, ROBERT MARTIN

Rank and organization: Sergeant, U.S. Army, Troop B, 2d Squadron. 17th Cavalry.

Place and date: Near La Chu, Republic of Vietnam, 6 May 1968.

Entered service at: Raleigh, Wake Co., North Carolina

Born: 16 April 1948, Durham, Durham Co., North Carolina

Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. Sgt. Patterson (then Sp4c.) distinguished himself while serving as a fire team leader of the 3d Platoon, Troop B, during an assault against a North Vietnamese Army battalion which was entrenched in a heavily fortified position. When the leading squad of the 3d Platoon was pinned down by heavy interlocking automatic weapon and rocket propelled grenade fire from 2 enemy bunkers, Sgt. Patterson and the 2 other members of his assault team moved forward under a hail of enemy fire to destroy the bunkers with grenade and machinegun fire. Observing that his comrades were being fired on from a third enemy bunker covered by enemy gunners in l-man spider holes, Sgt. Patterson, with complete disregard for his safety and ignoring the warning of his comrades that he was moving into a bunker complex, assaulted and destroyed the position. Although exposed to intensive small arm and grenade fire from the bunkers and their mutually supporting emplacements. Sgt. Patterson continued his assault upon the bunkers which were impeding the advance of his unit. Sgt. Patterson single-handedly destroyed by rifle and grenade fire 5 enemy bunkers, killed 8 enemy soldiers and captured 7 weapons. His dauntless courage and heroism inspired his platoon to resume the attack and to penetrate the enemy defensive position. Sgt. Patterson's action at the risk of his life has reflected great credit upon himself, his unit, and the U.S. Army.

Home of the Heroes

STOUT, MITCHELL WILLIAM

Rank and organization: Sergeant, U.S. Army, Battery C, 1st Battalion, 44th Artillery.

Place and Date: Khe Gio Bridge, Republic of Vietnam, 12 March 1970.

Entered service at: Raleigh, Wake Co., North Carolina

Born: 24 February 1950, Knoxville, Knox Co, Tennesse. (also see Lenoir City, Loudon Co., Tennessee)

Other Military Awards: Purple Heart

Citation: Sgt. Stout distinguished himself during an attack by a North Vietnamese Army Sapper company on his unit's firing position at Khe Gio Bridge. Sgt. Stout was in a bunker with members of a searchlight crew when the position came under heavy enemy mortar fire and ground attack. When the intensity of the mortar attack subsided, an enemy grenade was thrown into the bunker. Displaying great courage, Sgt. Stout ran to the grenade, picked it up, and started out of the bunker. As he reached the door, the grenade exploded. By holding the grenade close to his body and shielding its blast, he protected his fellow soldiers in the bunker from further injury or death. Sgt. Stout's conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action, at the cost of his own life, are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon him, his unit and the U.S. Army.

Place of burial Virtue Cemetery, Concord, Knox Co., Tennessee

Gulf Wars
The Southwest Asia Service Medal is a military decoration of the United States armed forces which was created by order of President George H.W. Bush on March 12, 1991. The decoration is intended to recognize those military service members who performed duty during the years of the Persian Gulf War. The medal was designed by Nadine Russell of the Army's Institute of Heraldry.

Individuals authorized the Southwest Asia Service Medal must have served in support of Operation Desert Shield or Desert Storm, in one or more of the following areas, between 2 August 1990 and 30 November 1995.

Source #1. Congressional Medal of Honor Society

Source #2. U.S. Senate Committee on Veterans' Affairs Report, Medal of Honor Recipients: 1863-1978 (Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1979).

Source #3. wikipedia, the free encyclopedia List of Medal of Honor Recipients, death dates and places, photographs of the Medal of Honor recipients.

Source #4. Military awards

Source #5. NCGenWeb

Source #6. Vicksburg National Military Park (Vicksburg, Mississippi)

Source #7. Find-a-Grave

Source #8. USGenWeb Archives VA

Source #9. Home of Heroes

Source #10. History/Army

Source #11. Arlington National Cemetery

Source #12. The Unofficial Web site of the Arlington National Cemetery. Webmaster: Michael R. Patterson Webmaster AT ArlingtonCemetery.net

Source #13. The Library of Congress

Source #14. Free Clipart

Source #14. Free American Clipart

Source #15. Military Flags (Coast Guard, animated)

Source #16. Star News (Wilmington, NC)

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Last update Sept. 26, 2010.

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