Posts tagged: Walking Tour

UNC Campus Walking Tours

By , September 14, 2011

uncUNC Visitors’ Center to launch ‘Priceless Gem’ tours on Friday, Sept 12, 2011
The Visitors’ Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will begin offering a new series of free tours for the public on Friday (Sept. 16).  Tours in the “Priceless Gem Series,” (which takes its name from a line in the UNC alma mater “Hark the Sound”) will be given most Fridays at 3 p.m., starting from UNC Visitors’ Center, located inside Morehead Planetarium and Science Center, 250 E. Franklin St.

University experts will lead these distinctive walking tours on various topics of interest. From archeology to architecture to the African-American experience to today’s sustainability issues, tours will offer a range of information and perspective.

Here is the schedule for the tours planned for this fall:

Sept. 16, architecture, led by Wendy Hillis, UNC historic preservationist

Sept. 23, “Black and Blue” tour of UNC’s historical landmarks in context of UNC’s racial history, led by Tim McMillan, adjunct assistant professor in the African and Afro-American studies department

Sept. 30, cemetery tour, led by Stephen Rich, Chapel Hill Preservation Society

Oct. 7, Coker Arboretum, led by natural science educator, N.C. Botanical Garden

Oct. 14, Carolina classic historical tour, led by Missy Julian-Fox, Visitors’ Center director

Oct. 28, The Noble Grove: A Walking Tour of Trees, led by Tom Bythell, UNC campus forest manager with Jill Coleman, UNC landscape architect

Nov. 4, sustainability tour, led by Cindy Shea, director of the UNC Sustainability Office, and UNC student EcoReps

Nov. 18, archaeology tour, led by Meg Kassabaum, research assistant, Research Labs of Archaeology

Dec. 2, architecture, led by Wendy Hillis, UNC historic preservationist

UNC Visitors’ Center contact: Missy Julian Fox, (919) 962-1630mjfox@unc.edu

http://uncnews.unc.edu/content/view/4749/107/


Next Meeting Sept 7, 7 pm at St. Matthews Church in Hillsborough

By , August 31, 2011
St Matthews Church

St Matthews Church

The September (D-OGS) meeting will be held on Wednesday evening, 7 September 2011 at 7p.m. at St Matthew’s Episcopal Church, 210 St. Mary’s Road in Hillsborough, NC.

Visit their webiste here: http://www.stmatthewshillsborough.org/

There is parking behind the church and across from the church on St. Mary’s Road.

We will be listening to Rev. Dr. N. Brooks Graebner speak about the historic cemetery at the church and take a guided tour of some of the graves of the prominent and historic persons buried there.

About the cemetery:
The historic St. Matthew’s cemetery is the final resting place for many early leaders of North Carolina, especially those from Orange County. There are 396 marked graves and 11 unmarked. Those buried here include members of local families including Cain, Cameron, Roulhac, Turner, and Webb.

About the Speaker:
The speaker will be the Rev. Dr. N. Brooks Graebner, Rector at St. Matthews. Rector Brooks Graebner came to St. Matthew’s in the spring of 1990, having previously served as the Assistant to the Rector at St. Peter’s in Charlotte, North Carolina. He moved to North Carolina in 1973 to attend Duke Divinity School, graduating with a Master of Divinity degree in 1976. He then continued his studies at Duke, earning a Ph.D. in American Religious History in 1984. By then, Brooks had become an Episcopalian and had entered the ordination process in the Diocese of North Carolina, a vocational decision very much shaped by the time he spent as organist & choir director of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Durham, his sponsoring parish. Before ordination, Brooks also completed a year at Virginia Theological Seminary and a year in the Chaplain Residency Program at UNC Hospital in Chapel Hill.

Brooks’ love for the study of church history is very much reflected in his extra-parochial involvements. He currently serves as the Historiographer of the Diocese of North Carolina. He is a past president of the local historical society and for ten years served as an officer & director of the Historical Society of the Episcopal Church. He teaches Anglican and Episcopal history in several formation programs of the diocese. He also is a steering committee member of the Durham-based Pauli Murray Project, which is devoted to honoring and extending the influence of this civil rights pioneer, historian, lawyer, and Episcopal priest.

About the church (taken from the web-site):
The General Assembly of North Carolina originally constituted St. Matthew’s Parish in 1752 as the established church in the County of Orange. The parish was reorganized in 1824, and the present church building was begun in 1825 and completed in 1826. It was consecrated by the Right Reverend John Stark Ravenscroft, the first Episcopal Bishop of North Carolina on May 21, 1826.
Letters of the period indicate that William Nichols, principal architect of the old state capital which was burned in 1831, designed the present structure. As far as we are able to learn, St. Matthew’s is the oldest Gothic Revival church building still standing in North Carolina. Nichols worked mainly in the Greek Revival idiom, but he knew Gothic work from both his native England as well as from visits to the northern United States. Nichols also designed Hillsborough’s Masonic Hall (1823). He left North Carolina in 1827 to work throughout the South, and died in Mississippi in 1853. Nichols is being increasingly recognized as one of the South’s finest antebellum architects.
There were others involved in the building of St. Matthew’s Church. As St. Matthew’s first Senior Warden, Francis Lister Hawks, grandson of the architect of Tryon Palace, likely had a great deal of input regarding the building. Walker Anderson, who was a member of the first vestry and who was the nephew of the great North Carolina jurist-legislator, Duncan Cameron, seems to have been the real project director. The master mason was Samuel Hancock, under whose hand John Berry, prominent local architect/builder, learned his skills.
St. Matthew’s Church has had many alterations throughout the years; the tower was added c. 1829 and under the leadership of the Rev. Moses Ashley Curtis, Rector from 1856 to 1872, extensive remodeling of the church was carried out. The east end was enlarged for a recessed chancel with triplet window, sacristy and organ room, and the exposed beam roof was raised c. 1868; the spire was added and the wainscoting was replaced c. 1875. A marble plaque in the narthex records the installation of the bell in 1878 as a Confederate Memorial.
St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.
The tracker-action organ, Opus number 1169, was purchased in 1883 for $1,040 from the Boston firm of Hook and Hastings. The organ is housed in an oak case and has seven ranks. It was removed from the church building on June 2, 2004 and completely restored by John Farmer, Pipe Organ Builders of Winston-Salem, NC. The organ returned to a newly refurbished organ room and was rededicated to God’s service on May 5, 2005.
The church building was thoroughly renovated and repaired in 2007-2008 and rededicated on St. Matthew’s Day, September 21, 2008.


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Photo of the church from Larry Lamb’s panoramio site

Civil War Walking Tour – April 24

By , April 5, 2010

As a part of the 145th anniversary of the end of the Civil War, Hillsborough will be partnering with the Chapel Hill Preservation Society to host its own commemorative event on April 24th. There will be two available tours, one starting at 12pm and one starting at 2pm. The tours will last approximately one hour. Tours begin at the Dickson House (Hillsborough Visitor’s Center), at 150 E. King St in Hillsborough. For more information please contact the Orange County Historical Museum at 919-732-2201.

The cost for this event is $5.00 per person.


This is just one event scheduled for this day. The Chapel Hill Preservation Society has a whole day of events scheduled for their Civil War Living History Day, including reenactments, videos, fashion shows, and music concerts. The event will conclude with a Lantern Tour through Chapel Hill 1865.

Tickets for the Lantern Tour are $15 per person and reservations are required. Tours begin at 7 pm and 8pm. Tours led by lanterns and comfortable shoes recommended. Contact the Preservation Society to make your reservations today at 942-7818.

Annual Durham Neighborhoods Hike is Saturday, April 10th

By , March 24, 2010

Join the Sierra Club and Get Up & Go Durham on April 10th, 2010 at 9:00 AM for our annual neighborhood hike through East Campus, West Durham & beyond. This walking tour will be narrated by our local history lover John Schelp.

Saturday, April 10 at 9:00 AM
Meet at Markham & Buchanan

Was Duke Chapel really going to be built in Walltown? What Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist went to EK Powe school? What song writer for Nora Jones and Lou Rawls was “born on a kitchen table” behind Magnolia Grill? Why is Ninth Street called Ninth Street? Where did Madonna take early dance lessons?

Come along and find out…

1920 Street Map: Trinity College is shown on the right while the Erwin Cotton Mill is on the left (where the three railroad spurs extend north into the mills). The West Durham mill village is north, west and south of the mills. Walltown and Trinity Heights are north of the college while Trinity Park lies to the east. Courtesy of Durham County Library.

The 4-mile loop starts at Markham & Buchanan (at the old City limits).

We’ll start by walking past the homes of Duke’s famous faculty and coaches on Buchanan, including the father of Duke basketball. We’ll go down Watts Street, past Trinity Park park, and then walk across East Campus to Ninth Street.

We’ll stroll up Ninth, past EK Powe, and see the South Ellerbe Creek Nature Area. We’ll walk through an old mill village, see some old liquor houses and a parsonage that was ordered from the Sears catalogue. We’ll continue up Oakland, past Oval Park, and Indian Trail Park in the Watts-Hillandale neighborhood.

We’ll head east along the West Ellerbe Trail in the 17-acre wood, then walk past the old Watts Hospital and cross Club Blvd (near 9th Street). We’ll go down a hidden alley, head over to Walltown and hear about Duke’s original plans to build here. Then through Trinity Heights and back to where we began.

You’ll see a little nature and learn some Durham history along the way. We might even get into current events in the Bull City.

Local history lover John Schelp will narrate along the way. You don’t have to register. Parking is available on streets near Markham and Buchanan.

2008 Walking tour. Image courtesy of Ildar Sagdejev

Co-sponsored by the Sierra Club and Get Up & Go Durham.

Please visit the History of Old West Durham website for more information.

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