October 2008 Newsletter

By , May 8, 2011

D-OGS Newsletter – October 2008
News & Articles of interest to Durham-Orange Genealogists

D-OGS MEETINGS FOR OCTOBER 2008

The next D-OGS Meeting will be held on Wednesday evening, 1 October 2008 at 7 p.m. at the Duke Homestead Visitor’s Center, 2828 Duke Homestead Road, Durham, NC 27705. Phone: (919) 477-5498 – One-half mile from I-85 and Guess Rd (Exit 175), Follow the brown historic site road signs.

The program for this month will be The Misha Defonseca Holocaust Fraud: Forensic Genealogy Lessons for Your Own Family. This is a film of a presentation by Sharon Sergeant to the Massachusetts Genealogical Council Annual Meeting and Seminar in April 2008. The film was produced by David T. Robertson and the Framingham, Massachusetts Public Access Television station.

The research methods used in exposing the Misha Defonseca Holocaust Fraud case can provide many lessons for any family history researcher in forensic genealogy techniques.

To read more about Sharon Sergeant: How a touching memoir became a shocking fraud: http://tinyurl.com/4x27dn

To read more about the producer: Uncovering hidden truths: Framingham man documents the exposure of a fraud: http://tinyurl.com/3p7vey

Computer CIG Meeting – 11 October – Chapel Hill Public Library from 9:00am until noon – “Are you planning to put together a CD of some of your ancestors or family stories for Christmas gifts this year? Have you done it before? Now’s a good time to get started before we get into the holiday rush when it’s all downhill. Let’s learn a bit about it and discuss some of the possibilities. If you have an example to share, please bring it along so we can get some ideas about how to proceed with our own projects.

If a computer presentation is not what you have in mind, we will also discuss what is new in computing that relates to us as genealogists, and see what has changed since we last visited some of the “Oldie Goldie” sites. Change is a constant and never more than in genealogical computing. So send me some sites to visit, and plan to join us at the library.”

MINUTES FROM THE D-OGS MEETING OF 3 SEPTEMBER 2008

Meeting Minutes: September 3, 2008

The meeting was called to order at 7:09 PM.

There were two visitors present from Garner who were researching the Belvin family.

Tonight’s program was “Tools Your Ancestors Might Have Used” and the speaker was our own Rob Elias.

He said that knowing the tools in the 1700s and beyond would come in handy when writing a description of your family as you could add the tools they would have had available for clearing land and building a house.

He pointed out that the tools that were used had evolved with the availability of materials such as wood and steel. What had started out as tools made totally of wood had developed into a combination of steel and wood as harnessing the power of fire had developed in the late 1800s. By the end of the 17th century, trees were being depleted in Europe and the British Isles. To build ships that kept the trading economy going, England stripped the forests.

When the New World opened up there were large sources of wood but also a need to clear them for planting, which required sturdy tools for cutting and sawing, so the settlers invented and improved tools to get the job done.

Rob took us through the tools needed to build a home, starting with the felling axe—both the European and American varieties—and the use of the kerf (which means cut) and was used in the felling of trees.

Houses were raised by several men working together while the women prepared the food for them. There was undoubtedly a blacksmith nearby to make the few pieces of metal hardware used on the house…hinges and handles…as well as to make and/or repair the axes.

The handle of the axe was originally straight and in later years was shaped for the specific use of the axe. The handle for a double bit axe was always straight but a single bit handle could be straight or curved for leverage. The end of the handle opposite the head was given a small bulge, sometimes ornamental, to prevent the handle from slipping out of the user’s hands. The handle of each man’s axe was based on the distance from his clasped hands to the ground.

After felling a tree of the appropriate size, the trunk was dragged to where the finishing could be done. A chalk line was snapped and, using the felling axe, the trunk would be scored on all four sides. Then it was hewed to the chalk line using a broad axe with an offset blade.

The next tool employed was the adz, which was used for smoothing and trimming to give the wood a finished look. It was swung lightly and slowly. Today a carpenter would probably use a planer.

A mortise axe was used to make the square holes or slots at the end of the beam. This formed a joint at a right angle to another beam.

There were craftsmen who made the shingles by shaving the wood with a drawknife. They sat at a shingle “horse” which held the shingle in place so it could be formed into a shape that was flat on one side and tapered on the other.

These tools allowed a group of men to build a snug house with fireplace and oven, windows and a loft that served many a homesteading family for decades.

There were other tools in use around the homestead some of which were made entirely of wood, such as a wooden hay fork made from the branch of a tree (possibly a willow). Examples of wooden spades with flat blades have been found.

Also there were wooden framing squares, a peg cutter, a device for cutting threads in a block of wood and even door hinges and latches were made from wood.

Rob had drawings of old saws, miter boxes and a sash saw as well as tools used by women such as a samp mortar which was an alternative for pulverizing corn and the quern which had two grinding stones that required the housewife to turn the top stone by use of a wooden handle and had to build some tremendous muscles.

Even the dogs were put to work with a treadmill contraption that turned meat over a spit.

Rob then moved into mechanically operated tools such as a loom, a sash saw powered by a mill, a spring-pole lathe, a foot pedal driven lathe and a post windmill with an illustration of the inside and how it was used to grind meal.

At the end of his presentation he showed some of old tools from his collection and Paul had also brought tools, including a rather extensive collection of yarn winders both American and Swedish.

Rob had quite an extensive bibliography with his presentation. If you wish more information or want to get a copy of the book list, please contact Rob.

The August minutes will be approved after the addition of two corrections.

Articles were again solicited for the Trading Path. Please send in your stories…about your families, houses or anything from Orange County. They would also like articles on methodology, book reviews, etc.

The next Trading Path will be ready to distribute in November.

Rob said there had been a Publication Committee meeting this week which consisted of he and Cathy, Richard for the newsletter and Paul for the website. The four issues this year of the Trading Path will cost $800 for each issue which exceeds the income for next year at this rate of publications but they will consider other options for the future.

Richard proposed a motion to increase dues by $5 as it had been years since dues had been increased. The motion was seconded. Paul asked for discussion. After some discussion, Richard offered an amended proposal to defer further discussion until October and to vote on the motion in November so that all members can have input on the increase. (Please let us know your opinion on the matter.)

Paul reminded us of the NGS conference May 13-16, 2009.

Paul said the October program was not definite at this time.

Bill Reed reported that the County Commissioners had a meeting which he attended and the Orange County Library Heritage Center was discussed but they indicated they probably would be deciding on it at their October meeting. Members were encouraged to attend the commissioners meeting.

The Treasurer reports that the bank statement shows a balance of $3469.11.

The meeting was dismissed at 9:20.
Respectfully submitted,

Tonya Fouse Krout
Secretary

Paul’s form this month is the Immigrant Passenger Arrival Log: allows you to record key data fields that are found on most passenger manifests. It’s on the other side. This is from the Ellis Island website. You will have to register but it is free. They also have a Pedigree Chart and a Family Group Sheet. http://www.ellisisland.org/genealogy/genealogy_charts.

YOUR TRADING PATH JOURNAL NEWS

We’re hard at work assembling volume 18 of The Trading Path, the final issue for 2008. You’ll be enjoying more family stories, articles of historical interest, some research tips, and another poem from long ago to test your memory in “Rhyme or Reason.”

Just as soon as this issue goes to the printers, we’ll begin laying out the initial one for 2009. Wouldn’t it be great to see a story about your family among the pages? Every family had at least one member who was important in the community, had some exciting adventures, or simply was a real character! Share your stories with the rest of us.

Submissions may be sent at any time to tradingpath@aol.com

We thank you!
Rob & Cathy Elias
Editors

CHANGE IN D-OGS DUES PROPOSED FOR 2009

You may not have noticed but a proposal was made in the September meeting to increase the dues. We have NEVER had a dues increase since our inception. We are in need of additional funds if we are to maintain our current and future publications rate. Postage and printing costs are going up. If we don’t raise dues, we won’t be able to offer multiple journal & newsletter issues every year. We have discussed at least a $5 increase and some members suggested a $10 increase. Any change would take effect in 2009. Please give us your feedback via the D-OGS newslist (NCDOGS-L@rootsweb.com) or by calling Richard Ellington (919-967-4168) or Paul Hollinghurst (919-544-6242). We will vote on this issue at our November 2008 meeting.

TRADING PATH ASSOCIATION FIRST SUNDAY HIKE, OCTOBER 5TH

We will hike at the Triangle Land Conservancy’s Johnston’s Mill Nature Preserve on October 5th. As usual we will launch the hike at 2 PM. We’ll meet in the parking lot just west of Turkey Farm road where it crosses New Hope Creek. This is a wonderfully serene setting within a few minutes of both Durham and Chapel Hill. When we visited there a few weeks ago we saw families hiking and wading and generally enjoying the place. We’ll learn a little about the Hogan family and some about local roads, fords and mills as there are remnants of all these and more in the Nature Preserve. Obviously, this preserve captures some of the human aspects of a past environment, vestiges of pre-modern times. One of the neater aspects about this site is that flowing through it is Old Field Creek. “Old Field” was a common descriptor for abandoned Native American cornfields and the creek name which appears on early maps indicates that at some point at some time there were Native American fields in the creek bottoms. Almost half the park is in an area called “Hogan’s Bottom” so that is the likely location of the original old fields. We’ll see all this and more on the 5th between 2 and 4. We hope to see you then.

INDIANA GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY OFFERS SEARCHABLE DATABASES

(The following article is from Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com. )

The Indiana Genealogical Society recently added a new feature to its web site; its own collection of searchable databases. These databases (located at http://www.indgensoc.org/membersonly/) are available to IGS members as a benefit of membership. The databases are searchable by first and last name, and include the ability to search by Soundex.

The databases cover everything from military records (Civil War, Mexican War and Spanish-American War) to church records and records for various schools (including Indiana University). If you are not an IGS member and want a glimpse of what you are missing, there are also a few databases that have public access. You can then purchase a membership online or through the mail.

The Indiana Genealogical Society will be adding more databases over the months and years to come. Come discover if your ancestors were part of the emigration through the area regarded as the crossroads of America.

AUNTS AND UNCLES: GRAND, NOT GREAT

Q. Some sources say my brother’s grandchildren are my grandniece and grandnephews. If that’s the case, why am I called a great-aunt? What is the correct term?

A. Great-aunt or great-uncle is a lot like second cousin: It’s common practice for people to call their grandparents’ siblings by these terms, just as they often refer to first cousins’ children as second cousins—but neither is technically correct. As you noted, the proper term for your relationship to your brother’s grandchildren is grandaunt, just like grandparent. Grand means that the relatives in question are two generations removed from one another.

So aunts and uncles follow the same pattern as parents as you tack on generations:

parent aunt/uncle
grandparent grandaunt/granduncle
great-grandparent great-grandaunt/great-granduncle
great-great-grandparent great-great-grandaunt/great-great-granduncle

And so on. “It’s a mistake to lump [grandaunts and granduncles] in with the greats,” says Jackie Smith Arnold in Kinship: It’s All Relative, 2nd edition (Genealogical Publishing Co.). “Mixing the generations causes confusion.” That may be the case, but given the widespread misusage of great-aunt, grandaunt might not be any clearer to your relatives. Having your grandnephews call you that certainly doesn’t hurt anything—it’s up to you whether you want to correct them.

In case you’re still wondering about cousins: Your first cousins’ children would be your first cousins once removed.

PROQUEST AND GOOGLE PARTNERSHIP WILL UNLOCK NEWSPAPER CONTENT – PROQUEST BRINGS CONTENT; GOOGLE BRINGS ACCESS

September 8, 2008 (Ann Arbor, Mich.) — ProQuest has formed a partnership with Google that has the potential to bring millions of pages of newspaper content to the open web. The program allows web access to archives of both large and small newspapers. Without this initiative, these newspapers might never be digitized.

“Newspapers are the lifeblood of every community–with a wide ranging interest for a myriad of users. The demand for digitized newspaper archives is clearly there. The problem is it that, until now, finding a workable economic model for libraries and publishers has been challenging,” said Rod Gauvin, ProQuest senior vice-president of publishing. “This model overcomes that hurdle, unlocking a wealth of content for libraries and internet users with unique research needs.”

The ProQuest/Google partnership does not impact ProQuest’s other digital newspaper offerings such as its acclaimed ProQuest Historical Newspapers, which will continue to be strongly developed for use by serious researchers. Users of such products require robust application and search tools provided by the power of the ProQuest platform. The content delivered via Google’s platform will be supported with a variety of advertising and e-commerce models that are standard in an open web context.

ProQuest will contribute content to the partnership, and will introduce newspaper publishers nationwide to the program. ProQuest will also supply from its microfilm vault newspaper content that can be delivered effectively in the less formal framework of the open web. The company currently holds more than 10,000 newspaper titles, most of which are pristine master film copies. This high level of microfilm quality allows for the creation of better scanned images, which will ultimately deliver more accurate OCR results for users.

While ProQuest’s film vault will be tapped, the open web model does not replace or diminish ProQuest’s commitment to microfilm. “The open web program is about access to content and has no impact on preservation, where microfilm is the ‘gold standard,’” said Mr. Gauvin. “Microfilm is a technology-neutral format, so no matter the state of future technology, anything preserved on it can be read and stored effectively. It’s an essential for preserving local history and culture, as well as the world’s scholarship.”

The work of the ProQuest/Google partnership commences immediately and is expected to be ongoing over multiple years.

For more information about ProQuest and its work to unlock all types of content for serious and casual research, visit www.proquest.com.

WEBSITES OF POSSIBLE INTEREST

WEBSITE FOR MAC USERS – George Eastman had a note in his genealogy newsletter about this website. Website host Ben Sayer has articles of interest for folks who are using Macintosh computer – http://macgenealogist.com/

BOOKS OF POSSIBLE INTEREST

I am glad to report that someone has responded to my calls for input to the newsletter. Member Rick Frederick sent me the following info on a book he suggests. Rick, thanks so much for the recommendation.

Color-Blind Justice: Albion Tourgee and the Quest for Racial Equality from the Civil War to Plessy V. Ferguson, Mark Elliott (2006)

The book may still be available from the publisher, Oxford University Press.

A provocative and compelling biography of Albion Tourgee, who coined the term “color-blind justice” in his tireless struggle for racial equality

Finalist, 2007 Peter Seaborg Award for Civil War Scholarship

http://www.oup.com/us/catalog/general/?queryField=keyword&query=Color-Blind+Justice&view=usa&viewVeritySearchResults=true

It is available at Amazon.com:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0195181395/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

CALENDAR OF UPCOMING EVENTS

ANDREW JOHNSON: ORIGINS, LEGACY, MEMORY – A Bicentennial Symposium on 4 October 2008 at Mordecai Historic Park in Raleigh

Johnson’s Youth in Raleigh 10:30 am – 12:00 noon
• “Andrew Johnson’s Raleigh” by Harry Watson, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
• “Widowhood, Weaving, and Mary Johnson” by Michelle Gillespie, Wake Forest University
• “Apprenticeships in Early 19th-Century North Carolina” by Karin Ziff, East Carolina University

Barbeque luncheon 12:00 noon – 1:00 pm

Johnson’s Legacy 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
• Hans Trefousse, professor emeritus, Brooklyn College

Registration for the symposium sessions is free but required. The barbeque luncheon is $5 per person. Call 919.857.4364 to register and get tickets for lunch.

ILLINOIS STATE GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY 40TH ANNIVERSARY CONFERENCE – October 18, 2008 in Elgin, Illinois. We are celebrating our 40th anniversary with Computer Lab Sessions:

• It’s All Online! Or Is It? – Lori Bessler, reference librarian for the Wisconsin Historical Society Library, provides basic instructions to make your online research more successful and productive.

• Digital Collections and Online Catalogs – This intermediate level session by Lori Bessler targets online resources and strategies for locating the expanding list of digital collections.

• Ctrl/Alt/Simplify: Word Tips for Genealogists – Debra Mieszala harnesses the power of Microsoft Word as a genealogical tool. Graduate to creating tables, footnotes and indexes.

Seating is Limited • Register Today!

ISGS Help Desk:

Have you hit a brick wall? Ask the experts! 15 minute individual appointments will be available throughout the day.

Register online using Paypal or print a registration form at www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ilsgs/. Email any questions to isgsconference@sbcglobal.net.

BENNETT PLACE EVENT – October 11-12 – Soldiers and Civilians, Life in the Carolinas during the Civil War. Experience what life was like for civilians and soldiers in the Piedmont Carolinas during the time of the American Civil War. Civilians will demonstrate domestic chores such as cooking, gardening, sewing and cleaning, while soldiers share their stories of enlistment, and their life in the Confederate army. There will also be games and activities for the young and old to include sack races, horseshoe throwing, and more. Donations gratefully accepted. 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

GOT RELATIVES FROM POMERANIA? – October is Family History Month so it is appropriate that George Unrine, our “Die Vorfahren” Editor, will present ‘Who Were the People of Pomerania?’ on 12 October for our Pommern group as well as members of the Immigrant Genealogical Society. Looking at the cultural and geographical history, he will discuss the geographical movements of these people and their history from Roman times to the formation of the Duchy of Pomerania.

Meetings are held at 2:00 PM in the Immigrant Genealogical Society Library, 1310 West Magnolia in Burbank. The IGS Library will be open from noon to 5 PM so we hope you will join us for the program and discussion/study afterwards.

Don’t forget to check out our website: www.pomeranianews.com and we hope you are one of the subscribers to our printed quarterly, DIE POMMERSCHEN LEUTE.

ALAMANCE BATTLEGROUND EVENT – October 13-17 – Colonial Living Week. Learn about colonial-era life through living history demonstrations. Highly recommended for schoolchildren. Groups must make reservations. For more information and reservations, call 336-227-4785. 9 a.m.-2 p.m.

DUKE HOMESTEAD EVENT – October 18 – An Evening at the Homestead. Join the Duke Homestead Junior Interpreters as they prepare the Homestead for winter. This afternoon program features traditional music, wagon rides, fall foods, and 19th century games. Bring a picnic for dinner on the grounds. 2-6 p.m.

ILLINOIS STATE GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY 40TH ANNIVERSARY CONFERENCE – 40 Years of Discovery – Portals to the Future – October 18, 2008 – Elgin, Illinois

Speakers
• D.Joshua Taylor – Research Services Coordinator at the New England Historic Genealogical Society
• Beau Sharbrough – Product manager for MyFamily.com
• Lori Bessler – Wisconsin Historical Society Library Outreach Coordinator
• Loretto “Lou” Szucs – Executive editor and vice president of community relations for Ancestry.com
• Susan Anderson – Area Family History Adviser for the FamilySearch Program
• Debra Mieszala – President of the Lake County (IL)Genealogical Society
• Eric Basir – Owner of Photo Grafix in Evanston
• Kathy Carey – Illinois State Registrar NSDAR

Discover and evaluate new web sites, online databases and free tools available on the Internet. Investigate Footnote, FamilySearch and NSDAR collections. Jumpstart your research with new techniques, get organized using MS Word tools and explore procedures for scanning and restoring documents.
Web site: www.rootsweb.com/~ilsgs
Email: isgsconference@sbcglobal.net

POZNAN PROJECT – On October 18-19 in Troy, Michigan, Lukasz Bielecki, the creator of the Poznan Project, will present four lectures at the Seminar of the Polish Genealogical Society of Michigan. One of the lectures will cover exclusively the Poznan Project. Please refer here for more details: http://www.pgsm.org/index_041.htm

TEXAS STATE GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY 2008 CONFERENCE at Abilene, Texas – Featuring Thomas W. Jones, Ph.D., CG, CGL doing 6 sessions on the theme of “Following the Evidence Trail” October 24 & 25, 2008

The registration form is on-line at http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~txsgs/tsgs2008conference.pdf

The Lone Star Chapter of the Association of Professional Genealogists will again do their Road Show with Free 15 minutes Consultations to help on a brick wall problem.

Partner Society Special Session to discuss issues that genealogical societies face.

Round Table Mini-Sessions – small group discussions on a large variety of topics.

Annual Awards Banquet honoring the Writing, Volunteer, Website, Scholarship & Grant Winners. Dinner Speaker – Dr. Don Jenkins.

Co-hosted by West Texas Genealogical Society

RANDOLPH COUNTY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY FREE FAMILY HISTORY SEMINAR – Saturday, October 25th at the Asheboro-Randolph County Public Library, entitled “The Invisible Ancestor,” from 10 AM to 2 PM. It will involve three sessions and Larry W. Cates, Jackie Hedstrom and Timothy Rackley will be the featured speakers. Topics include tracing impoverished ancestors, the myths and realities of Native American descent and use of county court minutes to pursue genealogical questions. Advanced registration is required because meeting room capacity is limited to fifty persons. For more information, you may view and/or print the flyer HERE.

SEMINAR IN PITTSBURGH – In honor of October being Family History Month, the North Hills Genealogists [of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania] is hosting an all-day conference on Saturday, 25 October 2008. A great program features speakers Pamela K. Boyer, CG, CGL of Springfield, Virginia and J. Mark Lowe, CG of Springfield, Tennessee. In addition to formal lectures, the conference will give attendees a unique opportunity to interact with these knowledgeable and personable speakers in small group discussions. This will provide a forum for attendees to get their questions answered and to get ideas for further research. The conference will be held at Christ Episcopal Church, 5910 Babcock Blvd., Pittsburgh, PA 15237 where parking is free. A continental breakfast and hot lunch are included in the modest price with early bird discounts until September 16. All are invited!

More information may be found at www.NorthHillsGenealogists.org.

Elissa Scalise Powell, CG – www.PowellGenealogy.com

2008 GENEALOGY SEMINAR AT SEA – Fly Away Travel is currently taking reservations for their Genealogy Seminar at Sea, sailing October 25th to November 1st, 2008. The Seminar at Sea will be hosted on board Royal Caribbean’s brand new, unparalleled, Liberty of the Seas, which will be sailing to the tropical Eastern Caribbean islands of Puerto Rico, St. Maarten & Royal Caribbean’s private paradise of Labadee.

This Seminar at Sea stands to be the best of the best in terms of its extraordinary array of some of the most prominent speakers in the Genealogy community today:

~ John Phillip Colletta ~ George G Morgan ~ Paul Milner
~ Laura G Prescott ~ Donna M Moughty ~ Paula Stuart-Warren
~ Michael J Leclerc ~ Stephen J Danko

Passengers will learn the latest techniques covering a broad spectrum of geographic areas, methodology, writing & publishing, internet research and problem solving. Guests will have the opportunity to choose up to 15 lectures that will take place in Liberty of the Seas four state of the art conference centers during the three days at sea. The authored speakers will be featured for book sales and autographs during a special group activity.

Check out our impressive line-up of topics & speakers for this event at www.GenealogyCruises.com

The cost of experiencing this week long seminar/vacation begins at just $829 per person, including all port taxes and seminar fees. Traveling companions not attending the Seminar at Sea qualify for a rate reduction, as well as the 3rd & 4th passengers sharing one cabin. (Ask for details)

Fly Away Travel is a full service Travel Agency with nearly 100 yrs of combined experience. Fly Away Travel specializes in Group Travel, Honeymoons, Destination Weddings & Family Vacations. Contact Cindy Lorenz at Fly Away Travel 800-837-0295 or by e-mail: FlyAwayInc@aol.com

PERSONAL HISTORIANS SET TO CONVENE IN SALT LAKE CITY – Want some expert help in preparing a personal history? Looking to organize piles of family records, stories or photographs? Not sure how to video an interview? Ask for the assistance of a professional personal historian!

Members of the Association of Personal Historians (APH) have the skills to capture the stories of a lifetime in print and/or video. To sharpen those skills, personal and family historians will convene this fall for the fourteenth annual international conference. Registration is now open, and new participants are invited to attend.

The 2008 APH Conference will be held October 29-November 2 in downtown Salt Lake City, Utah. The keynote address, “Oral History: Use It or Lose It,” will be presented by nationally respected family historian, author and speaker Sharon DeBartolo Carmack. Best-selling author, Dr. Terry Warner, will present “The Decisions We Make: Mini-Crossroads in Our Lives.”

The conference theme is Crossroads in Personal History. Successful historians from across the nation will share their expertise at seminars, panel discussions and 30 outstanding workshops on topics such as building a business, bringing stories to life, conducting meaningful interviews, editing for clarity and accessing the resources of the Family History Library, the world’s largest genealogical repository.
Preserving personal and family history has always featured prominently in the culture of the Intermountain West, which is why APH is reaching out to oral historians, writers, journalists, genealogists and videographers in western states to take a look at this opportunity.

For more information, visit the APH website: http://personalhistorians.org/conference or contact Paulette at (801) 261-5203. Early registration discount for APH members applies until July 31.

FIFTH ANNUAL AFRICAN AMERICAN GENEALOGY WORKSHOP – Saturday, November 1, 2008, 8:30 am to 3:30 pm – Eiteljorg Museum, 500 West Washington St., Indianapolis, IN. Parking is free – IAAGG Member Advance $25 – Non-member $35At the door – Lunch on your own at 12:15 at nearby Sky City Café or State Museum Café: $30 $40

Synopsis of Presentations – Visit www.IndyAfriAmGen.org for session descriptions & schedule. The theme of this year’s workshop is stories as passed down from your grandparents, but with added support of your research. Getting the stories firsthand, then placing your ancestors in historical content of time and place is most important.

THE 32ND ANNUAL FLORIDA STATE GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY CONFERENCE – This year¹s conference will be held on November 14th and 15th at the beautiful Sheraton Orlando North in Maitland, Florida. The featured speaker is Jana Sloan Broglin, CGSM, a well-known genealogical writer, professional researcher, and speaker who will present four fascinating lectures. The event is being hosted by the Central Florida Genealogical Society.

* The two-day conference registration fee for FSGS Members is $88.00! (The non-Member fee is $98.00.)
* The hotel room rate at the Sheraton is $88.00 per night!
* 8 top-notch speakers in addition to Ms. Broglin will present a well-balanced program with something for every attendee in every session time slot!

Our roster of speakers will be presenting a wealth of topics to help you learn new skills and expand your knowledge to improve your research. The speakers include: Ann Bergelt; Pamela J. Cooper; Amy Larner Giroux, CGSM, CGLSM; George G. Morgan; Donna M. Moughty; Mary P. Parker; Drew Smith, MLS; and C. Ann Staley, CGSM.

Vendors are already clamoring for exhibit hall space to showcase their products and services. Genealogical, historical, and lineage societies will be there to share information and sell their books. Drawings will take place throughout the conference for great prizes too!

The Florida Chapter of the Association of Professional Genealogists (APG) will once again host their hugely popular “Ancestor Road Show” and will meet with you one-on-one to provide guidance and suggestions for your toughest research problems.

The annual Gala Awards Banquet will be held on Friday evening, November 14th, to celebrate this year¹s successful applicants in the prestigious Florida Pioneer Descendants Certification Program. A host of cultural and entertainment attractions in the area and in nearby Orlando also make this conference weekend an ideal getaway for your family and friends. Why not take advantage of the great hotel rate and the location for great leisure fun?

Mark your calendar now! You won¹t want to miss this year¹s conference. Visit the FSGS Web site at www.flsgs.org to learn more and to print your registration form for what promises to be ³The Great ¹08 Conference²! And check back for more information that will be posted at the site.

HUMOR

A cowboy, who is visiting Wyoming from Texas, walks into a bar and orders three mugs of Bud. He sits in the back of the room, drinking a sip out of each one in turn. When he finishes them, he comes back to the bar and orders three more.

The bartender approaches and tells the cowboy, ‘You know, a mug goes flat after I draw it. It would taste better if you bought one at a time.’

The cowboy replies, ‘Well, you see, I have two brothers. One is in Arizona, the other is in Colorado. When we all left our home in Texas, we promised that we’d drink this way to remember the days when we drank together. So I’m drinking one beer for each of my brothers and one for myself.’

The bartender admits that this is a nice custom, and leaves it there.

The cowboy becomes a regular in the bar, and always drinks the same way. He orders three mugs and drinks them in turn.

One day, he comes in and only orders two mugs. All the regulars take notice and fall silent. When he comes back to the bar for the second round, the bartender says, ‘I don’t want to intrude on your grief, but I wanted to offer my condolences on your loss.’

The cowboy looks quite puzzled for a moment, then light dawns in his eyes and he laughs.

‘Oh, no, everybody’s just fine, ‘ he explains, ‘It’s just that my wife and I joined the Baptist Church and I had to quit drinking – hasn’t affected my brothers though.’

PARTING THOUGHT

“With hurricanes, tornados, fires out of control, mud slides, flooding, severe thunderstorms tearing up the country from one end to another, and with the threat of bird flu and terrorist attacks, are we sure this is a good time to take God out of the Pledge of Allegiance?” – Jay Leno

If you have any items of interest that you would like to submit for future publication, please contact Richard Ellington at richard_ellington@unc.edu or 919.967.4168

D-OGS, P.O. Box 4703, Chapel Hill, NC 27515-4703
Copyright (c) 2008 D-OGS All rights reserved

D-OGS Newsletter – October 2008

News & Articles of interest to Durham-Orange Genealogists

D-OGS MEETINGS FOR OCTOBER 2008

The next D-OGS Meeting will be held on Wednesday evening, 1 October 2008 at 7 p.m. at the Duke Homestead Visitor’s Center, 2828 Duke Homestead Road, Durham, NC 27705. Phone: (919) 477-5498 – One-half mile from I-85 and Guess Rd (Exit 175), Follow the brown historic site road signs.

The program for this month will be The Misha Defonseca Holocaust Fraud: Forensic Genealogy Lessons for Your Own Family. This is a film of a presentation by Sharon Sergeant to the Massachusetts Genealogical Council Annual Meeting and Seminar in April 2008. The film was produced by David T. Robertson and the Framingham, Massachusetts Public Access Television station.

The research methods used in exposing the Misha Defonseca Holocaust Fraud case can provide many lessons for any family history researcher in forensic genealogy techniques.

To read more about Sharon Sergeant: How a touching memoir became a shocking fraud: http://tinyurl.com/4x27dn

To read more about the producer: Uncovering hidden truths: Framingham man documents the exposure of a fraud: http://tinyurl.com/3p7vey

Computer CIG Meeting – 11 October – Chapel Hill Public Library from 9:00am until noon – “Are you planning to put together a CD of some of your ancestors or family stories for Christmas gifts this year? Have you done it before? Now’s a good time to get started before we get into the holiday rush when it’s all downhill. Let’s learn a bit about it and discuss some of the possibilities. If you have an example to share, please bring it along so we can get some ideas about how to proceed with our own projects.

If a computer presentation is not what you have in mind, we will also discuss what is new in computing that relates to us as genealogists, and see what has changed since we last visited some of the “Oldie Goldie” sites. Change is a constant and never more than in genealogical computing. So send me some sites to visit, and plan to join us at the library.”

MINUTES FROM THE D-OGS MEETING OF 3 SEPTEMBER 2008

Meeting Minutes: September 3, 2008

The meeting was called to order at 7:09 PM.

There were two visitors present from Garner who were researching the Belvin family.

Tonight’s program was “Tools Your Ancestors Might Have Used” and the speaker was our own Rob Elias.

He said that knowing the tools in the 1700s and beyond would come in handy when writing a description of your family as you could add the tools they would have had available for clearing land and building a house.

He pointed out that the tools that were used had evolved with the availability of materials such as wood and steel. What had started out as tools made totally of wood had developed into a combination of steel and wood as harnessing the power of fire had developed in the late 1800s. By the end of the 17th century, trees were being depleted in Europe and the British Isles. To build ships that kept the trading economy going, England stripped the forests.

When the New World opened up there were large sources of wood but also a need to clear them for planting, which required sturdy tools for cutting and sawing, so the settlers invented and improved tools to get the job done.

Rob took us through the tools needed to build a home, starting with the felling axe—both the European and American varieties—and the use of the kerf (which means cut) and was used in the felling of trees.

Houses were raised by several men working together while the women prepared the food for them. There was undoubtedly a blacksmith nearby to make the few pieces of metal hardware used on the house…hinges and handles…as well as to make and/or repair the axes.

The handle of the axe was originally straight and in later years was shaped for the specific use of the axe. The handle for a double bit axe was always straight but a single bit handle could be straight or curved for leverage. The end of the handle opposite the head was given a small bulge, sometimes ornamental, to prevent the handle from slipping out of the user’s hands. The handle of each man’s axe was based on the distance from his clasped hands to the ground.

After felling a tree of the appropriate size, the trunk was dragged to where the finishing could be done. A chalk line was snapped and, using the felling axe, the trunk would be scored on all four sides. Then it was hewed to the chalk line using a broad axe with an offset blade.

The next tool employed was the adz, which was used for smoothing and trimming to give the wood a finished look. It was swung lightly and slowly. Today a carpenter would probably use a planer.

A mortise axe was used to make the square holes or slots at the end of the beam. This formed a joint at a right angle to another beam.

There were craftsmen who made the shingles by shaving the wood with a drawknife. They sat at a shingle “horse” which held the shingle in place so it could be formed into a shape that was flat on one side and tapered on the other.

These tools allowed a group of men to build a snug house with fireplace and oven, windows and a loft that served many a homesteading family for decades.

There were other tools in use around the homestead some of which were made entirely of wood, such as a wooden hay fork made from the branch of a tree (possibly a willow). Examples of wooden spades with flat blades have been found.

Also there were wooden framing squares, a peg cutter, a device for cutting threads in a block of wood and even door hinges and latches were made from wood.

Rob had drawings of old saws, miter boxes and a sash saw as well as tools used by women such as a samp mortar which was an alternative for pulverizing corn and the quern which had two grinding stones that required the housewife to turn the top stone by use of a wooden handle and had to build some tremendous muscles.

Even the dogs were put to work with a treadmill contraption that turned meat over a spit.

Rob then moved into mechanically operated tools such as a loom, a sash saw powered by a mill, a spring-pole lathe, a foot pedal driven lathe and a post windmill with an illustration of the inside and how it was used to grind meal.

At the end of his presentation he showed some of old tools from his collection and Paul had also brought tools, including a rather extensive collection of yarn winders both American and Swedish.

Rob had quite an extensive bibliography with his presentation. If you wish more information or want to get a copy of the book list, please contact Rob.

The August minutes will be approved after the addition of two corrections.

Articles were again solicited for the Trading Path. Please send in your stories…about your families, houses or anything from Orange County. They would also like articles on methodology, book reviews, etc.

The next Trading Path will be ready to distribute in November.

Rob said there had been a Publication Committee meeting this week which consisted of he and Cathy, Richard for the newsletter and Paul for the website. The four issues this year of the Trading Path will cost $800 for each issue which exceeds the income for next year at this rate of publications but they will consider other options for the future.

Richard proposed a motion to increase dues by $5 as it had been years since dues had been increased. The motion was seconded. Paul asked for discussion. After some discussion, Richard offered an amended proposal to defer further discussion until October and to vote on the motion in November so that all members can have input on the increase. (Please let us know your opinion on the matter.)

Paul reminded us of the NGS conference May 13-16, 2009.

Paul said the October program was not definite at this time.

Bill Reed reported that the County Commissioners had a meeting which he attended and the Orange County Library Heritage Center was discussed but they indicated they probably would be deciding on it at their October meeting. Members were encouraged to attend the commissioners meeting.

The Treasurer reports that the bank statement shows a balance of $3469.11.

The meeting was dismissed at 9:20.

Respectfully submitted,

Tonya Fouse Krout

Secretary

Paul’s form this month is the Immigrant Passenger Arrival Log: allows you to record key data fields that are found on most passenger manifests. It’s on the other side. This is from the Ellis Island website. You will have to register but it is free. They also have a Pedigree Chart and a Family Group Sheet. http://www.ellisisland.org/genealogy/genealogy_charts.

YOUR TRADING PATH JOURNAL NEWS

We’re hard at work assembling volume 18 of The Trading Path, the final issue for 2008. You’ll be enjoying more family stories, articles of historical interest, some research tips, and another poem from long ago to test your memory in “Rhyme or Reason.”

Just as soon as this issue goes to the printers, we’ll begin laying out the initial one for 2009. Wouldn’t it be great to see a story about your family among the pages? Every family had at least one member who was important in the community, had some exciting adventures, or simply was a real character! Share your stories with the rest of us.

Submissions may be sent at any time to tradingpath@aol.com

We thank you!

Rob & Cathy Elias

Editors

CHANGE IN D-OGS DUES PROPOSED FOR 2009

You may not have noticed but a proposal was made in the September meeting to increase the dues. We have NEVER had a dues increase since our inception. We are in need of additional funds if we are to maintain our current and future publications rate. Postage and printing costs are going up. If we don’t raise dues, we won’t be able to offer multiple journal & newsletter issues every year. We have discussed at least a $5 increase and some members suggested a $10 increase. Any change would take effect in 2009. Please give us your feedback via the D-OGS newslist (NCDOGS-L@rootsweb.com) or by calling Richard Ellington (919-967-4168) or Paul Hollinghurst (919-544-6242). We will vote on this issue at our November 2008 meeting.

TRADING PATH ASSOCIATION FIRST SUNDAY HIKE, OCTOBER 5TH

We will hike at the Triangle Land Conservancy’s Johnston’s Mill Nature Preserve on October 5th. As usual we will launch the hike at 2 PM. We’ll meet in the parking lot just west of Turkey Farm road where it crosses New Hope Creek. This is a wonderfully serene setting within a few minutes of both Durham and Chapel Hill. When we visited there a few weeks ago we saw families hiking and wading and generally enjoying the place. We’ll learn a little about the Hogan family and some about local roads, fords and mills as there are remnants of all these and more in the Nature Preserve. Obviously, this preserve captures some of the human aspects of a past environment, vestiges of pre-modern times. One of the neater aspects about this site is that flowing through it is Old Field Creek. “Old Field” was a common descriptor for abandoned Native American cornfields and the creek name which appears on early maps indicates that at some point at some time there were Native American fields in the creek bottoms. Almost half the park is in an area called “Hogan’s Bottom” so that is the likely location of the original old fields. We’ll see all this and more on the 5th between 2 and 4. We hope to see you then.

INDIANA GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY OFFERS SEARCHABLE DATABASES

(The following article is from Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com. )

The Indiana Genealogical Society recently added a new feature to its web site; its own collection of searchable databases. These databases (located at http://www.indgensoc.org/membersonly/) are available to IGS members as a benefit of membership. The databases are searchable by first and last name, and include the ability to search by Soundex.

The databases cover everything from military records (Civil War, Mexican War and Spanish-American War) to church records and records for various schools (including Indiana University). If you are not an IGS member and want a glimpse of what you are missing, there are also a few databases that have public access. You can then purchase a membership online or through the mail.

The Indiana Genealogical Society will be adding more databases over the months and years to come. Come discover if your ancestors were part of the emigration through the area regarded as the crossroads of America.

AUNTS AND UNCLES: GRAND, NOT GREAT

Q. Some sources say my brother’s grandchildren are my grandniece and grandnephews. If that’s the case, why am I called a great-aunt? What is the correct term?

A. Great-aunt or great-uncle is a lot like second cousin: It’s common practice for people to call their grandparents’ siblings by these terms, just as they often refer to first cousins’ children as second cousins—but neither is technically correct. As you noted, the proper term for your relationship to your brother’s grandchildren is grandaunt, just like grandparent. Grand means that the relatives in question are two generations removed from one another.

So aunts and uncles follow the same pattern as parents as you tack on generations:

parent aunt/uncle

grandparent grandaunt/granduncle

great-grandparent great-grandaunt/great-granduncle

great-great-grandparent great-great-grandaunt/great-great-granduncle

And so on. “It’s a mistake to lump [grandaunts and granduncles] in with the greats,” says Jackie Smith Arnold in Kinship: It’s All Relative, 2nd edition (Genealogical Publishing Co.). “Mixing the generations causes confusion.” That may be the case, but given the widespread misusage of great-aunt, grandaunt might not be any clearer to your relatives. Having your grandnephews call you that certainly doesn’t hurt anything—it’s up to you whether you want to correct them.

In case you’re still wondering about cousins: Your first cousins’ children would be your first cousins once removed.

PROQUEST AND GOOGLE PARTNERSHIP WILL UNLOCK NEWSPAPER CONTENT – PROQUEST BRINGS CONTENT; GOOGLE BRINGS ACCESS

September 8, 2008 (Ann Arbor, Mich.) — ProQuest has formed a partnership with Google that has the potential to bring millions of pages of newspaper content to the open web. The program allows web access to archives of both large and small newspapers. Without this initiative, these newspapers might never be digitized.

“Newspapers are the lifeblood of every community–with a wide ranging interest for a myriad of users. The demand for digitized newspaper archives is clearly there. The problem is it that, until now, finding a workable economic model for libraries and publishers has been challenging,” said Rod Gauvin, ProQuest senior vice-president of publishing. “This model overcomes that hurdle, unlocking a wealth of content for libraries and internet users with unique research needs.”

The ProQuest/Google partnership does not impact ProQuest’s other digital newspaper offerings such as its acclaimed ProQuest Historical Newspapers, which will continue to be strongly developed for use by serious researchers. Users of such products require robust application and search tools provided by the power of the ProQuest platform. The content delivered via Google’s platform will be supported with a variety of advertising and e-commerce models that are standard in an open web context.

ProQuest will contribute content to the partnership, and will introduce newspaper publishers nationwide to the program. ProQuest will also supply from its microfilm vault newspaper content that can be delivered effectively in the less formal framework of the open web. The company currently holds more than 10,000 newspaper titles, most of which are pristine master film copies. This high level of microfilm quality allows for the creation of better scanned images, which will ultimately deliver more accurate OCR results for users.

While ProQuest’s film vault will be tapped, the open web model does not replace or diminish ProQuest’s commitment to microfilm. “The open web program is about access to content and has no impact on preservation, where microfilm is the ‘gold standard,’” said Mr. Gauvin. “Microfilm is a technology-neutral format, so no matter the state of future technology, anything preserved on it can be read and stored effectively. It’s an essential for preserving local history and culture, as well as the world’s scholarship.”

The work of the ProQuest/Google partnership commences immediately and is expected to be ongoing over multiple years.

For more information about ProQuest and its work to unlock all types of content for serious and casual research, visit www.proquest.com.

WEBSITES OF POSSIBLE INTEREST

WEBSITE FOR MAC USERS – George Eastman had a note in his genealogy newsletter about this website. Website host Ben Sayer has articles of interest for folks who are using Macintosh computer – http://macgenealogist.com/

BOOKS OF POSSIBLE INTEREST

I am glad to report that someone has responded to my calls for input to the newsletter. Member Rick Frederick sent me the following info on a book he suggests. Rick, thanks so much for the recommendation.

Color-Blind Justice: Albion Tourgee and the Quest for Racial Equality from the Civil War to Plessy V. Ferguson, Mark Elliott (2006)

The book may still be available from the publisher, Oxford University Press.

A provocative and compelling biography of Albion Tourgee, who coined the term “color-blind justice” in his tireless struggle for racial equality

Finalist, 2007 Peter Seaborg Award for Civil War Scholarship

http://www.oup.com/us/catalog/general/?queryField=keyword&query=Color-Blind+Justice&view=usa&viewVeritySearchResults=true

It is available at Amazon.com:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0195181395/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

CALENDAR OF UPCOMING EVENTS

ANDREW JOHNSON: ORIGINS, LEGACY, MEMORY – A Bicentennial Symposium on 4 October 2008 at Mordecai Historic Park in Raleigh

Johnson’s Youth in Raleigh 10:30 am – 12:00 noon

• “Andrew Johnson’s Raleigh” by Harry Watson, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

• “Widowhood, Weaving, and Mary Johnson” by Michelle Gillespie, Wake Forest University

• “Apprenticeships in Early 19th-Century North Carolina” by Karin Ziff, East Carolina University

Barbeque luncheon 12:00 noon – 1:00 pm

Johnson’s Legacy 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

• Hans Trefousse, professor emeritus, Brooklyn College

Registration for the symposium sessions is free but required. The barbeque luncheon is $5 per person. Call 919.857.4364 to register and get tickets for lunch.

ILLINOIS STATE GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY 40TH ANNIVERSARY CONFERENCE – October 18, 2008 in Elgin, Illinois. We are celebrating our 40th anniversary with Computer Lab Sessions:

• It’s All Online! Or Is It? – Lori Bessler, reference librarian for the Wisconsin Historical Society Library, provides basic instructions to make your online research more successful and productive.

• Digital Collections and Online Catalogs – This intermediate level session by Lori Bessler targets online resources and strategies for locating the expanding list of digital collections.

• Ctrl/Alt/Simplify: Word Tips for Genealogists – Debra Mieszala harnesses the power of Microsoft Word as a genealogical tool. Graduate to creating tables, footnotes and indexes.

Seating is Limited • Register Today!

ISGS Help Desk:

Have you hit a brick wall? Ask the experts! 15 minute individual appointments will be available throughout the day.

Register online using Paypal or print a registration form at www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ilsgs/. Email any questions to isgsconference@sbcglobal.net.

BENNETT PLACE EVENT – October 11-12 – Soldiers and Civilians, Life in the Carolinas during the Civil War. Experience what life was like for civilians and soldiers in the Piedmont Carolinas during the time of the American Civil War. Civilians will demonstrate domestic chores such as cooking, gardening, sewing and cleaning, while soldiers share their stories of enlistment, and their life in the Confederate army. There will also be games and activities for the young and old to include sack races, horseshoe throwing, and more. Donations gratefully accepted. 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

GOT RELATIVES FROM POMERANIA? – October is Family History Month so it is appropriate that George Unrine, our “Die Vorfahren” Editor, will present ‘Who Were the People of Pomerania?’ on 12 October for our Pommern group as well as members of the Immigrant Genealogical Society. Looking at the cultural and geographical history, he will discuss the geographical movements of these people and their history from Roman times to the formation of the Duchy of Pomerania.

Meetings are held at 2:00 PM in the Immigrant Genealogical Society Library, 1310 West Magnolia in Burbank. The IGS Library will be open from noon to 5 PM so we hope you will join us for the program and discussion/study afterwards.

Don’t forget to check out our website: www.pomeranianews.com and we hope you are one of the subscribers to our printed quarterly, DIE POMMERSCHEN LEUTE.

ALAMANCE BATTLEGROUND EVENT – October 13-17 – Colonial Living Week. Learn about colonial-era life through living history demonstrations. Highly recommended for schoolchildren. Groups must make reservations. For more information and reservations, call 336-227-4785. 9 a.m.-2 p.m.

DUKE HOMESTEAD EVENT – October 18 – An Evening at the Homestead. Join the Duke Homestead Junior Interpreters as they prepare the Homestead for winter. This afternoon program features traditional music, wagon rides, fall foods, and 19th century games. Bring a picnic for dinner on the grounds. 2-6 p.m.

ILLINOIS STATE GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY 40TH ANNIVERSARY CONFERENCE – 40 Years of Discovery – Portals to the Future – October 18, 2008 – Elgin, Illinois

Speakers

• D.Joshua Taylor – Research Services Coordinator at the New England Historic Genealogical Society

• Beau Sharbrough – Product manager for MyFamily.com

• Lori Bessler – Wisconsin Historical Society Library Outreach Coordinator

• Loretto “Lou” Szucs – Executive editor and vice president of community relations for Ancestry.com

• Susan Anderson – Area Family History Adviser for the FamilySearch Program

• Debra Mieszala – President of the Lake County (IL)Genealogical Society

• Eric Basir – Owner of Photo Grafix in Evanston

• Kathy Carey – Illinois State Registrar NSDAR

Discover and evaluate new web sites, online databases and free tools available on the Internet. Investigate Footnote, FamilySearch and NSDAR collections. Jumpstart your research with new techniques, get organized using MS Word tools and explore procedures for scanning and restoring documents.

Web site: www.rootsweb.com/~ilsgs

Email: isgsconference@sbcglobal.net

POZNAN PROJECT – On October 18-19 in Troy, Michigan, Lukasz Bielecki, the creator of the Poznan Project, will present four lectures at the Seminar of the Polish Genealogical Society of Michigan. One of the lectures will cover exclusively the Poznan Project. Please refer here for more details: http://www.pgsm.org/index_041.htm

TEXAS STATE GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY 2008 CONFERENCE at Abilene, Texas – Featuring Thomas W. Jones, Ph.D., CG, CGL doing 6 sessions on the theme of “Following the Evidence Trail” October 24 & 25, 2008

The registration form is on-line at http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~txsgs/tsgs2008conference.pdf

The Lone Star Chapter of the Association of Professional Genealogists will again do their Road Show with Free 15 minutes Consultations to help on a brick wall problem.

Partner Society Special Session to discuss issues that genealogical societies face.

Round Table Mini-Sessions – small group discussions on a large variety of topics.

Annual Awards Banquet honoring the Writing, Volunteer, Website, Scholarship & Grant Winners. Dinner Speaker – Dr. Don Jenkins.

Co-hosted by West Texas Genealogical Society

RANDOLPH COUNTY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY FREE FAMILY HISTORY SEMINAR – Saturday, October 25th at the Asheboro-Randolph County Public Library, entitled “The Invisible Ancestor,” from 10 AM to 2 PM. It will involve three sessions and Larry W. Cates, Jackie Hedstrom and Timothy Rackley will be the featured speakers. Topics include tracing impoverished ancestors, the myths and realities of Native American descent and use of county court minutes to pursue genealogical questions. Advanced registration is required because meeting room capacity is limited to fifty persons. For more information, you may view and/or print the flyer HERE.

SEMINAR IN PITTSBURGH – In honor of October being Family History Month, the North Hills Genealogists [of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania] is hosting an all-day conference on Saturday, 25 October 2008. A great program features speakers Pamela K. Boyer, CG, CGL of Springfield, Virginia and J. Mark Lowe, CG of Springfield, Tennessee. In addition to formal lectures, the conference will give attendees a unique opportunity to interact with these knowledgeable and personable speakers in small group discussions. This will provide a forum for attendees to get their questions answered and to get ideas for further research. The conference will be held at Christ Episcopal Church, 5910 Babcock Blvd., Pittsburgh, PA 15237 where parking is free. A continental breakfast and hot lunch are included in the modest price with early bird discounts until September 16. All are invited!

More information may be found at www.NorthHillsGenealogists.org.

Elissa Scalise Powell, CG – www.PowellGenealogy.com

2008 GENEALOGY SEMINAR AT SEA – Fly Away Travel is currently taking reservations for their Genealogy Seminar at Sea, sailing October 25th to November 1st, 2008. The Seminar at Sea will be hosted on board Royal Caribbean’s brand new, unparalleled, Liberty of the Seas, which will be sailing to the tropical Eastern Caribbean islands of Puerto Rico, St. Maarten & Royal Caribbean’s private paradise of Labadee.

This Seminar at Sea stands to be the best of the best in terms of its extraordinary array of some of the most prominent speakers in the Genealogy community today:

~ John Phillip Colletta ~ George G Morgan ~ Paul Milner

~ Laura G Prescott ~ Donna M Moughty ~ Paula Stuart-Warren

~ Michael J Leclerc ~ Stephen J Danko

Passengers will learn the latest techniques covering a broad spectrum of geographic areas, methodology, writing & publishing, internet research and problem solving. Guests will have the opportunity to choose up to 15 lectures that will take place in Liberty of the Seas four state of the art conference centers during the three days at sea. The authored speakers will be featured for book sales and autographs during a special group activity.

Check out our impressive line-up of topics & speakers for this event at www.GenealogyCruises.com

The cost of experiencing this week long seminar/vacation begins at just $829 per person, including all port taxes and seminar fees. Traveling companions not attending the Seminar at Sea qualify for a rate reduction, as well as the 3rd & 4th passengers sharing one cabin. (Ask for details)

Fly Away Travel is a full service Travel Agency with nearly 100 yrs of combined experience. Fly Away Travel specializes in Group Travel, Honeymoons, Destination Weddings & Family Vacations. Contact Cindy Lorenz at Fly Away Travel 800-837-0295 or by e-mail: FlyAwayInc@aol.com

PERSONAL HISTORIANS SET TO CONVENE IN SALT LAKE CITY – Want some expert help in preparing a personal history? Looking to organize piles of family records, stories or photographs? Not sure how to video an interview? Ask for the assistance of a professional personal historian!

Members of the Association of Personal Historians (APH) have the skills to capture the stories of a lifetime in print and/or video. To sharpen those skills, personal and family historians will convene this fall for the fourteenth annual international conference. Registration is now open, and new participants are invited to attend.

The 2008 APH Conference will be held October 29-November 2 in downtown Salt Lake City, Utah. The keynote address, “Oral History: Use It or Lose It,” will be presented by nationally respected family historian, author and speaker Sharon DeBartolo Carmack. Best-selling author, Dr. Terry Warner, will present “The Decisions We Make: Mini-Crossroads in Our Lives.”

The conference theme is Crossroads in Personal History. Successful historians from across the nation will share their expertise at seminars, panel discussions and 30 outstanding workshops on topics such as building a business, bringing stories to life, conducting meaningful interviews, editing for clarity and accessing the resources of the Family History Library, the world’s largest genealogical repository.

Preserving personal and family history has always featured prominently in the culture of the Intermountain West, which is why APH is reaching out to oral historians, writers, journalists, genealogists and videographers in western states to take a look at this opportunity.

For more information, visit the APH website: http://personalhistorians.org/conference or contact Paulette at (801) 261-5203. Early registration discount for APH members applies until July 31.

FIFTH ANNUAL AFRICAN AMERICAN GENEALOGY WORKSHOP – Saturday, November 1, 2008, 8:30 am to 3:30 pm – Eiteljorg Museum, 500 West Washington St., Indianapolis, IN. Parking is free – IAAGG Member Advance $25 – Non-member $35At the door – Lunch on your own at 12:15 at nearby Sky City Café or State Museum Café: $30 $40

Synopsis of Presentations – Visit www.IndyAfriAmGen.org for session descriptions & schedule. The theme of this year’s workshop is stories as passed down from your grandparents, but with added support of your research. Getting the stories firsthand, then placing your ancestors in historical content of time and place is most important.

THE 32ND ANNUAL FLORIDA STATE GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY CONFERENCE – This year¹s conference will be held on November 14th and 15th at the beautiful Sheraton Orlando North in Maitland, Florida. The featured speaker is Jana Sloan Broglin, CGSM, a well-known genealogical writer, professional researcher, and speaker who will present four fascinating lectures. The event is being hosted by the Central Florida Genealogical Society.

* The two-day conference registration fee for FSGS Members is $88.00! (The non-Member fee is $98.00.)

* The hotel room rate at the Sheraton is $88.00 per night!

* 8 top-notch speakers in addition to Ms. Broglin will present a well-balanced program with something for every attendee in every session time slot!

Our roster of speakers will be presenting a wealth of topics to help you learn new skills and expand your knowledge to improve your research. The speakers include: Ann Bergelt; Pamela J. Cooper; Amy Larner Giroux, CGSM, CGLSM; George G. Morgan; Donna M. Moughty; Mary P. Parker; Drew Smith, MLS; and C. Ann Staley, CGSM.

Vendors are already clamoring for exhibit hall space to showcase their products and services. Genealogical, historical, and lineage societies will be there to share information and sell their books. Drawings will take place throughout the conference for great prizes too!

The Florida Chapter of the Association of Professional Genealogists (APG) will once again host their hugely popular “Ancestor Road Show” and will meet with you one-on-one to provide guidance and suggestions for your toughest research problems.

The annual Gala Awards Banquet will be held on Friday evening, November 14th, to celebrate this year¹s successful applicants in the prestigious Florida Pioneer Descendants Certification Program. A host of cultural and entertainment attractions in the area and in nearby Orlando also make this conference weekend an ideal getaway for your family and friends. Why not take advantage of the great hotel rate and the location for great leisure fun?

Mark your calendar now! You won¹t want to miss this year¹s conference. Visit the FSGS Web site at www.flsgs.org <http://www.flsgs.org/> to learn more and to print your registration form for what promises to be ³The Great ¹08 Conference²! And check back for more information that will be posted at the site.

HUMOR

A cowboy, who is visiting Wyoming from Texas, walks into a bar and orders three mugs of Bud. He sits in the back of the room, drinking a sip out of each one in turn. When he finishes them, he comes back to the bar and orders three more.

The bartender approaches and tells the cowboy, ‘You know, a mug goes flat after I draw it. It would taste better if you bought one at a time.’

The cowboy replies, ‘Well, you see, I have two brothers. One is in Arizona, the other is in Colorado. When we all left our home in Texas, we promised that we’d drink this way to remember the days when we drank together. So I’m drinking one beer for each of my brothers and one for myself.’

The bartender admits that this is a nice custom, and leaves it there.

The cowboy becomes a regular in the bar, and always drinks the same way. He orders three mugs and drinks them in turn.

One day, he comes in and only orders two mugs. All the regulars take notice and fall silent. When he comes back to the bar for the second round, the bartender says, ‘I don’t want to intrude on your grief, but I wanted to offer my condolences on your loss.’

The cowboy looks quite puzzled for a moment, then light dawns in his eyes and he laughs.

‘Oh, no, everybody’s just fine, ‘ he explains, ‘It’s just that my wife and I joined the Baptist Church and I had to quit drinking – hasn’t affected my brothers though.’

PARTING THOUGHT

“With hurricanes, tornados, fires out of control, mud slides, flooding, severe thunderstorms tearing up the country from one end to another, and with the threat of bird flu and terrorist attacks, are we sure this is a good time to take God out of the Pledge of Allegiance?” – Jay Leno

If you have any items of interest that you would like to submit for future publication, please contact Richard Ellington at richard_ellington@unc.edu or 919.967.4168

D-OGS, P.O. Box 4703, Chapel Hill, NC 27515-4703

Copyright (c) 2008 D-OGS All rights reserved

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