March 2008 Newsletter

By , May 8, 2011

D-OGS Newsletter – March 2008

News & Articles of interest to Durham-Orange genealogists

D-OGS MEETINGS FOR MARCH 2008

The next D-OGS Meeting will be held on Wednesday evening, 5 March 2008 at 7 p.m. at the Duke Homestead Visitor’s Center, 2828 Duke Homestead Road, Durham, NC 27705. Phone: (919) 477-5498 – One-half mile from I-85 and Guess Rd (Exit 175), Follow the brown historic site road signs.

The 5 March meeting program will be “Roots of Resistance — A Story of the Underground Railroad” PBS Video in The American Experience series.

In the mid-1800s, black men and women traveled a network of escape routes known as the underground railroad. Over dark forest trails, back roads and rivers, they made their way along carefully mapped routes leading to night trains to the north or boats to the south. Their flight from the shackles of slavery in the south was organized by other escaped slaves and their allies.

This program recounts the little-known story of black America’s secret railroad to freedom through narratives of escaped slaves. Viewers listen to interviews with descendents of slaves and slaveholders describing personal danger and terrible risks involved in each slave’s departure. After the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850, even a successful flight to free territory didn’t guarantee freedom from professional slave catchers who hunted down these men and women and returned them to a life of bondage on southern plantations.

The D-OGS Computer Interest Group (CIG) Meeting will meet on Saturday morning, 15 March 2008 at 9 a.m. at the Chapel Hill Library downstairs in the small conference room of the Chapel Hill Public Library, 100 Library Drive, Chapel Hill, NC. For the March meeting we will be discussing an article from “INTERNET Genealogy”, February/March 2008 entitled “Creating the Context for Your Ancestors’ Lives” by Leslie Huber, and following some of the author’s leads in strolling through history via our computers. We will then look at sites CIG members send me before the meeting that have been the greatest help or interest to them that we would not ordinarily be familiar with. It is important that folks send me the URLs early enough to be included in the agenda so the meeting moves along evenly, so dig back and remember where it was that you found that special bit of information and share it with us.

We’ll also use a Google trick to get news from your hometown sent right to your desktop every day so you won’t miss a trick. How do you keep track of what’s going on there? Tell us.

D-OGS MEETING MINUTES – FEBRUARY 6, 2008

The meeting was called to order at 7:07 PM.

The evening’s program was “NC Dialects” and the speaker was Dr. Walt Wolfram of North Carolina State in Raleigh. He is the William C. Friday Distinguished Professor, Coordinator of Linguistics at NC State and specializes in language variation and social and ethnic dialects.

To find out more about the Linguistics Program at NC State visit http://www.ncsu.edu/linguistics/

Dr. Wolfram explained the various causes of the development of dialects, such as:

• The Founder Effect—the first settlers leave a lasting imprint on the language and dialect traditions.

• Patterns of Migration

• Historical Events—there were wider differences in dialects between the North and South after the Civil War.

• Population Shift

He said there was a strong genealogical/language connection and understanding the dialects of a region could help in reading old documents.

He said there are 15 areas in North Carolina where they go in and interview the oldest people and then younger ones in the same family to see the patterns of speech and how they have changed over the generations.

He said the Outer Banks was a prime example of the Founder Effect and that “y’all” started in the south and was an independent development.

Dr. Wolfram said when they study the cities of North Carolina they study the settlement history, the shifting population and the Yankee effect. He cited Duke as an example where the Yankee students have a different pronunciation of the school name then the Southern students.

He played us various pieces from the DVDs that have been compiled by the North Carolina Language and Life Project (NCLLP) so that we could hear the differences region to region and from old to young. They have books, VHS tapes, CDs and DVDs available for purchase from the various areas of North Carolina. Information about them is available at www.talkingnc.com

Dr. Wolfram received an enthusiastic round of applause for his fascinating program and then he packed up to get home to watch the Duke/NC game.

Paul Hollinghurst announced that we would get through the business meeting quickly so everyone who was interested could get home in time to watch the game.

The minutes for January 2008 were approved as published in the Newsletter.

Rob Elias announced that the Trading Path was completed and Cathy would hand them out to everyone attending the meeting on their way out the door. He said they planned to have the next issue of the Trading Path completed in a few months and that Kathy had three articles she needed volunteers to type up. Fran Ferrell volunteered to type up all three.

Rob also reminded those in attendance that NGS would be held in Raleigh in May 2009 and he would like to work out a time that D-OGS can sponsor a luncheon and invite our out of town members to attend. He also said there would be a great need for us to volunteer for a variety of tasks (of course, our out of town members could also serve as volunteers).

Elizabeth Hamilton said the program for March 5 will be “The Underground Railroad”. She will show a video from PBS which contains a number of references to North Carolina sites.

Ann had submitted a Treasurer’s Report to Paul. Our current balance is $5371.94.

All business having been concluded, we dismissed at 8:39 PM.

Respectfully submitted,

Tonya Krout

Secretary

For those you who aren’t able to attend a meeting, I wanted to inform you that Paul usually prints a useful form or information on the back of the Agenda and includes the source. This month’s form struck me as particularly helpful. It is “Source Summary for Family Information” and he gave the source as: http://helpdesk.rootsweb.com/get_started/charts_forms.html

D-OGS CIG SUMMARY – FEBRUARY 2008

Questions and problems you’re having:

How to search a wife in NC who went alone to MD before 1850 census could show her location? We discussed a number of resources that might provide some answers such as deeds, wills and distributions, church records, and witnesses of these transactions who share surnames with the target family. We also recommended the use of TMG as a research tool that might narrow the search with the use of roles and witnesses.

What’s New?

A New Blog for Genealogists -http://genealogyandfamilyhistory.com/

Vista- http://www.microsoft.com/windows/products/windowsvista/facts.mspx

TMG Questions:

Transfer from 6.0 to 7.0 remains problematic in some cases. File sent to TMG support.

Web sites worth visiting:

Census Tools (forms) – http://www.censustools.com/

MapCard- http://www.mapcard.com/

Greg Boyd’s River Map Research – http://www.familymaps.com/rivers/index.html

Railroad Station Historical Society- http://www.rrshs.org/index.html

Civil War Album – http://www.civilwaralbum.com/index.html

Lost and Found Photos – http://www.lostandfoundphotos.net/

Patents through Google -http://www.google.com/patents

Find People – http://www.monash.com/people.html

Diigo – http://www.diigo.com/

NY Vital Records – http://stevemorse.org/vital/nymarriages.html?index=groom

Pharos Genealogy Courses – http://www.pharostutors.com/?sssdmh=dm13.158184

Eclectic Web Sites:

Sizes – Society Richardson Scale of Deadly Quarrels – http://www.sizes.com/indexSR.htm

Neat things from the web that any genealogist can use:

Google Books – http://books.google.com

Burling Books – http://home.comcast.net/~jane81/

Topic Du Jour:

Utilizing a Range of Search Engines to meet our needs

New York Times Newsroom Navigator – http://tech.nytimes.com/top/news/technology/cybertimesnavigator/index.html/

Searching the Net? Here Are Places to Start:

Google Search, mail, maps and more. It includes a search of Usenet discussions, a government search, an image search, maps, local listings and Google Scholar for scholarly literature – http://www.google.com/ig?hl=en

Yahoo! Search, news, e-mail, shopping, and many other services – http://www.yahoo.com/

Vivisimo searches and categorizes results helpfully – http://vivisimo.com/

A9, from Amazon, adds some interesting twists to Web search – http://www.a9.com/

Alta Vista now from Overture, includes audio and video search – http://www.altavista.com/

The Open Directory Project aims to become the largest Web directory edited by (volunteer) humans – http://www.dmoz.org/

All the Web, from Fast Search, is quick and simple – http://www.alltheweb.com/

Ask.com has Web search and several other useful search features – http://www.ask.com/

Ixquick, Excite, Dogpile, CNet Search.com and Metacrawler simultaneously search different combinations of multiple Web search engines

http://www.ixquick.com/

http://www.excite.com/

http://www.dogpile.com/

http://www.search.com/

http://www.metacrawler.com/

Reporter’s Desktop conveniently consolidates many ways to find people and things – http://www.reporter.org/desktop/

Librarians’ Index to the Internet Useful sites organized and annotated by librarians in California and Washington – http://lii.org/

About.com has humans who assemble mini-sites on a wide variety of topics – http://www.about.com/

Searchmil.com searches for information in military (.mil) computers – http://www.searchmil.com/

The Hardin Meta Directory catalogs health-related sites – http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/hardin/md/

Topica and Tile.Net will help you find Internet mailing lists – http://lists.topica.com/ & http://www.tile.net/

NCGS THIRD ANNUAL SPEAKERS FORUM

The North Carolina Genealogical Society & the Olivia Raney Local and Family History Library are sponsoring the Third Annual Speakers Forum on 12 April 2008 in Raleigh, North Carolina at the Wake County Commons Building at 4011 Carya Drive. General, intermediate and advanced level presentations include “Writing Your Ancestor ’s Story: a Civil War Case Study (Catherine Elias); “Using the Neighbors to Find your Ancestors (Monica Hopkins); “Using ‘Web 2.0’ to Share and Collaborate on Genealogy (Jordan Jones); “Orphans and Scholars: Genealogical Records Relating to Children (Victor Jones); “Raleigh in the War Years 1861-1865” (Kevin Milus); “The Digital CSR: Saunders and Clark (and Weeks) in the Internet Age” (Jason Tomberlin); “Explore NC through maps from the comfort of your home!” (Diane Richard); “People Finders for North Carolina” (Jeffrey Haines); and “Money in 18th Century Colonial America” (Jim Jones). Information and Registration: http://www.ncgenealogy.org.

You will note that our own Cathy Elias is a featured speaker this year. Registration forms will be available at the March meeting. You may also print a registration form at http://ncgenealogy.org/Events/2008/2008%20Speaker’s%20Forum.pdf.

Registrants may choose from two lectures during most of the time slots. The programs run from 8:30 until 4:00. The cost is $30 for NCGS members and $40 for non-members. There is a $5 early bird discount if you register before 3 April. A box lunch will be provided for an extra $10.

NEWS FROM THE TRADING PATH ASSOCIATION (TPA)

NC “Migration Trails” Project Starts in 2008 – The NC Department of Commerce has asked the TPA to organize a state-wide array of “Migration Trails”. The first of these will be the Great Wagon Road. This will be a proof of product project to debug the method to be used and demonstrate feasibility. We will engage historians, tourism, economic development, and other planning persons in every county along each trail. They will basically define their assets. The TPA will develop the over-all trail and assist as needed with reconciling interpretations. This promises to be a wonderful project, a great challenge and an excellent opportunity for the TPA. Once we’ve demonstrated and debugged the process of development we believe we’ll be able to apply the process to almost every North Carolina county as we have thus far identified at least a dozen old trade routes that evolved into migration routes into the Old North State ranging from the Dismal Swamp Trail of the Quakers and Green’s Path and the Great Central Coast Road in the East, to the Unicol Trail and Rutherford’s Trail in the west, with a handful of Occaneechi, Catawba, Waxhaw, Cheraw, and Saura Trails in between.

If you are aware of an old trade route in your county, advocate for it with us and, eventually, with your county politicos and economic development folk. Heritage tourism is without a doubt the best bang for the buck economic development available for most NC counties.

TPA MARCH 2008 FIRST SUNDAY HIKE AT MOOREFIELDS

We will meet at Moorefields, a historic plantation west of Hillsborough off Dimmocks Mill Road for our March First Sunday hike. As usual, we will gather in time for a 2:00 PM departure and we’ll be back at our cars again by 4:00PM. Moorefields is a fascinating site as it seems it was sited on a couple of strategically important roads that have since faded from sight. They are now absorbed into Interstate 85 headed for Petersburg, VA, and Interstate 40 headed down the Neuse-Cape Fear watershed for the sounds. We think John Lawson must have over-nighted in an Occaneechi town near hear on the edge of the Haw Fields.

We’ll see old roadbeds, house sites, and an old cemetery along with a ford or two. Most of the hike will be brush free and on relatively smooth though unimproved ground. Wear sturdy shoes.

ANOTHER LOCAL CEMETERY “BITES THE DUST”

It seems that the Markham-Christian Family cemetery at 1013 Watts Street may have been intentionally destroyed or illegally moved. This tragedy was reported awhile back in the Durham Herald-Sun but apparently nothing has been done to rectify the situation. See the details at http://endangereddurham.blogspot.com/2007/12/mcmanhandled-when-your-footers-need-to.html . This cemetery was identified several years ago, surveyed and is listed in Allen Dew’s Cemetery Census (http://cemeterycensus.com/nc/durh/cem060.html). Many questions remain about the conditions under which the cemetery was removed. Have the remains been moved to a new location? If so there seems to be no formal record of it.

If you live in Durham, please contact one of your council members and ask them to look into this. The way this cemetery has been treated is shameful. Local authorities should be asked to make some accounting for these actions.

COLONIAL NORTH CAROLINA RECORDS

During the American Revolution, North Carolina confiscated the real estate of residents who refused to support the Revolution. Seizure of this property was an answer to an ongoing war debt. The government offered the land for sale to anyone who would take an oath of allegiance to the state. If you have an ancestor who received a land warrant in North Carolina during or after 1779, you probably have proof that he or she supported the Revolution.

The NC Archives have microfilmed most of these land records. They are a fairly large body of work. For instance, the land warrants, plats and related documents for the counties of Richmond, Robeson, Rockingham, Rowan and Rutherford fill 58 rolls.

MISSOURI STATE ARCHIVES

By John Dougan, Missouri State Archivist

(I thought this article might be of interest to some D-OGS because I know that some of you are doing research in Missouri. Ed.)

The Missouri State Archives, a division of Secretary of State Robin Carnahan’s office, provides genealogists, historians, and the general public with access to the state’s historic public records. These holdings, dating from 1770, include records from all branches and agencies in state government.

The Archives holds more than 463 million pages of records on paper and microfilm, 500,000 photographs, and 9,000 maps. Resources for family and community history research include over 50,000 reels of county and local government records on microfilm. Included in these records are marriages, deeds, wills, circuit and probate records, county court minutes, early birth and death records and much more. The Archives also holds a significant collection of local history publications and more than one thousand family histories donated by local historians and genealogists.

The Archives takes pride in providing exceptional patron service and pursuing innovative programs and initiatives. Since 2000, the institution has regularly received national recognition. Among these honors are two grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities to preserve St. Louis Circuit Court case files. The American Association for State and Local History has recognized the Archives with three Awards of Merit, most recently in 2007 for its online Death Certificate Database, which contains over two million death certificates issued from 1910 to 1956. Each of the past five years, Family Tree Magazine has named the Archives’ website (www.sos.mo.gov/archives) one of the top family history research websites in the nation.

Volunteers have been important contributors to the success of the Archives’ programs. Without their help, the quantity of records available online would be limited by staff time. A great deal of indexing and transcription has been accomplished by volunteers, freeing professional staff to acquire, arrange, and describe even more collections. All volunteers are valued, but the e-volunteer program, where records are photocopied and mailed to volunteers for data entry, is particularly vital to making records accessible. Over the years, more than 1200 people in 43 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and three foreign countries have answered appeals from the Archives for volunteer assistance. Anyone wishing to participate in future volunteer projects can contact the Missouri State Archives at archvol@sos.mo.gov.

Excitement about the work of the Archives further increased in 2007 when Secretary Carnahan announced the Missouri Digital Heritage Initiative, a state funded program designed to further enhance access to records. The initiative, set to launch in early 2008, will dramatically expand Missouri’s historical profile via the Internet, making available full-text records, historical maps, photographs and entire record series. Participation in the initiative is not limited to the Secretary of State’s office; local and regional historical societies and libraries are also invited to share their historical treasures with Missouri and the world. More information on the initiative and how to participate is available at missouridigitalheritage.com.

Please visit the Archives’ website and the website of Missouri Digital Heritage. I hope to see you at the National Genealogical Society Conference in Kansas City.

(Originally published in UpFront with NGS, The Online Newsletter of the National Genealogical Society. http://www.NGSgenealogy.org/upfront.htm)

MORE GOOD NEWS FOR RESEARCH IN THE MISSOURI AREA

Begin making plans now to visit historic Independence, Missouri for the May opening of the new Midwest Genealogy Center. The $8 million, 50,000 square foot facility will occupy 8 acres at 3401 S. Kiger Road in Independence.

Holdings will offer extensive microfilm and microfiche sources, including U. S. census records, Civil War histories, Native American records, biographical archives and Black family history records, and a large variety of state records for Missouri and other states. These include tax records, penitentiary records, military service records, passenger lists, records of antebellum southern plantations, genealogical periodicals, 60,000 titles of families genealogies, local and state histories and other vital records. For more information, call 816-252-7228 or go to www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/branch/ge/.

(Thanks to Paul Hollinghurst for finding this info and passing it along)

MARSHFIELD, WISCONSIN PUBLIC LIBRARY ADDS ONLINE GENEALOGY INDEX

The Marshfield, Wisconsin Public Library has completed a 20 year project: an online local genealogy database. If you had ancestors in the Marshfield area, this is a great new resource.

This database represents over 20 years of work by many individuals. Volunteers representing the Marshfield Area Genealogy Group and Marshfield Public Library culled through microfilm newspapers for records of births, deaths and marriages. Their efforts were complemented by the work of GreenThumb/Experience Works/Senior Aides worker, Hilly Weimert. Work on the index is continuous, with new events added each month. This online index covers over 200,000 events reported in the Marshfield, Wisconsin area newspapers.

Anyone who’s interested in their family history can go online and research an index of more than 200,000 events, including anything that was documented in local newspapers dating back to before the 1920′s. It includes records of births, deaths, and marriages.

The online index is available at http://209.94.183.10/website/services_vdb.htm. If you visit the library, you can actually see the original newspaper article that mentions your family member.

(I know we have some D-OGS members who are doing research in Wisconsin, so I thought this may be of interest to those folks. This article is from Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright 2007 by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com.)

SEARCH THE VIRTUAL SURNAME WALL

(The following was written by Paula Hinkel of the Southern California Genealogical Society)

We are very pleased to announce the roll-out of the searchable Virtual Surname Wall database, sponsored by the Southern California Genealogical Society. The Virtual Surname Wall is free and open for use by all family historians and genealogists. You need not be a member of SCGS to participate.

Although it took a little longer than we anticipated or wished, entries from over a thousand genealogists from around the world are now searchable by family name, by geographic region, and by each participant’s Submitter ID.

Access the Virtual Surname Wall at www.SCGSGenealogy.com. To see if any of your surnames are listed:

1. Click on the link to “Search the Virtual Surname Wall”.

2. Search by surname, location, or Submitter ID or any combination of the three. It is a “begins with” search. For example, if you search for the last name Mill, it will return the names beginning with the letters Mill. (i.e., Millan, Millard, Miller).

3. Be sure to read the search tips that are listed on the search page.

If you haven’t yet added your names to the database, or if you want to add more:

1. Have your family information available for reference.

2. Click on the link to “Add Your Surnames”

3. Enter the following information for each surname you are reporting:

a. Surnames (including spelling variations).

b. Geographic area in which they lived, or the migration path.

i. List your geographic information in order by city, county, state and country. To avoid confusion, please do not use two-letter state abbreviations.

c. Time Frame. Use abbreviations (approx., or abt., or ca.) to indicate approximate time frames.

4. Submit as many names as you want. Each entry screen will accept up to 10 surnames but you can enter multiple screens. If you get a message that the survey has already been completed, just click “Take the survey again” and continue adding names. You may add ancestors from any geographic location worldwide.

As entries are added to the database, the Virtual Surname Wall will become an even more valuable resource for family historians and genealogy researchers. You will not immediately see new entries but will be notified when they have been added to the Virtual Surname Wall. Check back often to look for a match.

Your participation in the Virtual Surname Wall project is completely voluntary. Your contact information is not displayed online. You have the option of asking SCGS to serve as intermediary, or authorizing SCGS to release your contact information in the event that we receive an inquiry regarding a possible family connection.

Please feel free to forward this email to your cousins, friends, fellow genealogists or others who would be interested in the Virtual Surname Wall project. Genealogy and historical societies are welcome to post this announcement in newsletters or journals. Reprint permission is granted but please include contact information (phinkel@scgsgenealogy.com). We thank you for your contributions to the Virtual Surname Wall. Here’s to making lots of connections!

P.S. – and while you’re at the website, check out the program for the 2008 Genealogy Jamboree, which will be held June 27-29 in Burbank, California!

ONTARIO GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY WORKSHOPS

If you have relatives or ancestors in Canada, you may be interested in these workshops. Of course, it means you will need to go to Canada.

The Toronto Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society is offering an array of courses in the Winter/Spring 2008 season for genealogists at all levels of expertise. For course program and registration information, please visit http://www.torontofamilyhistory.org/courses.html.

DID CLIMATE CHANGE KILL YOUR ANCESTORS?

In June 1783 the Laki volcano in Iceland began to erupt, producing in the months that followed clouds of volcanic gases 80 times greater than in the Mount St Helens eruption of 1980. The impact of the gases on the climate was far-reaching – in the eastern United States the winter of 1783-84 was almost 9 degrees (Fahrenheit) colder than average, and icebergs floated down the Mississippi into the Gulf of Mexico.

Half of the horses and cattle, and three-quarters of the sheep on Iceland died, but the death and destruction was far more widespread. It has been estimated that 23,000 people died in England as a result of the eruption – in parts there were twice as many deaths as in a normal summer – and some historians believe that as many of 5% of the French population died in a single year.

Could any of your ancestors been affected?

(I picked up this little tidbit from the “LostCousins” newsletter)

WEBSITES OF POSSIBLE INTEREST

US GEOLOGICAL SURVEY MAPS AND RESOURCES ONLINE – For information on tracking down historical maps, go to http://mac.usgs.gov/isb/pubs/factsheets/fs15499.html.

Details on finding old aerial photographs can be found at http://erg.usgs.gov/isb/pubs/factsheets/fs12796.html.

Unfamiliar names of towns or places – for example, towns that no longer exist – can be searched at http://geonames.usgs.gov/.

Additional information on using USGS resources for genealogy can be found at http://erg.usgs.gov/isb/pubs/factsheets/fs09902.html.

GOT RELATIVES IN NEW JERSEY? – The Hudson County Genealogical Society is pleased to offer this database of the official list of Bayonne servicemen who were killed or died in service during World War I, courtesy of member Bill Miller.

For more information, please visit the Hudson County Genealogical Society Web site at www.hudsoncountynjgenealogy.org and click the “Databases” button.

Coming Soon! Bill Miller’s index to over 13,000 Death Notices published in the Bayonne Times from 1917-1939. Keep Checking!

BOOKS OF POSSIBLE INTEREST

ORANGE COUNTY, N.C. ABSTRACTS OF THE MINUTES OF THE PLEAS AND QUARTERS SESSIONS OF SEPT.1752 – AUG. 1766 – this volume contains the only remaining court records for the Colonial era of this county on the migration route from Pennsylvania south to Georgia. $30 – from the Southern Historical Press, P.O. Box 1267, Greenville, SC 29602-1267 or call 800-233-0152.

CALENDAR OF UPCOMING EVENTS

BLACK HISTORY PROGRAM AT BURWELL SCHOOL – February 28 – The Hillsborough Literary Association welcomes Judge Beverly Scarlett at 7:30 p.m. for a talk focusing on the history of African-Americans in Hillsborough at the Burwell School Historic Site.

CARL SANDBURG COLLEGE WORKSHOPS – Carl Sandburg College in Galesburg, Illinois is proud to announce its offerings for our 10th annual “Genealogy Computing Week” 3 through 8 March 2008. This weeklong series of genealogy computer workshops will be held in our state of the art computer labs with limited enrollment.

Offerings for 2008 are:

• Using Footnote.com

• Using Ancestry.com

• FTM 2008

• RootsMagic

• Free Genealogy Online

Registration is limited to keep class size small and is on a first come, first served basis. Registration is $35 per day (the same as 10 years ago), includes the handout, but not lunch.

More details are on our site at: http://www.rootdig.com/sandburg.html including where Galesburg, Illinois, USA is and how to get there. Questions can be sent to me off list at mjnrootdig@gmail.com.

SOUTHERN GENEALOGIST’S EXCHANGE SOCIETY SPRING SEMINAR – March 8th, 2008. “Bringing Your Ancestors to Life” is a day-long workshop designed to help genealogists and others write a family history. The workshop focuses on several different approaches to writing a family narrative including documenting the journey, character sketches, and using “faction” to bring interest to your account while staying accurate. The goal of the workshop is to give participants options to transform volumes of research into readable narratives. No previous writing experience is necessary. The seminar/workshop is presented by Patricia Charpentier of Orlando, Florida. Mrs. Charpentier holds an M.A. in Creative Writing from the University of Central Florida and a B.A. in journalism from Louisiana State University. She has worked as a memoirist, writing coach, editor, instructor, journalist and photographer.

The early bird fee is $25.00 (including lunch) through the month of February. On March 1, the fee will convert to $35.00 without lunch guaranteed. Seminar location is Riverside Presbyterian Church, Bittinger Hall, 849 Park Street, Jacksonville. Registration 8:30AM Seminar 9:00-4:00 Call today to register at (904)778-1000 or (904) 333-5222. Seating is limited.

Contact Person: Betty Reed, President, The Southern Genealogist’s Exchange Society, Inc. , 6215 Sauterne Drive, Jacksonville, Florida 32210 – (904) 778-1000 (Tues-Thurs & Sat 10:00AM to 3:PM) Staffed by volunteers – (904) 262-1948 Home Phone – (904) 333-5222 Cell Phone – email: president@sgesjax.com

ILLINOIS HUMANITIES COUNCIL ROAD SCHOLARS’ SPEAKERS PROGRAM – The Sangamon County, Illinois Genealogical Society and The Illinois Humanities Council Road Scholars’ Speakers Program will present: Guy Fraker who will speak on “Abraham Lincoln and the Eighth Judicial Circuit” Monday, March 10, 2008. The meeting will be held at Springfield, Illinois’ public library, The Lincoln Library, which is located at 326 South 7th Street, Springfield, Illinois. The library’s phone number is 217-753-4900. The meeting begins at 7:00 pm, the program follows shortly thereafter. Everyone is welcome to attend the meeting. Come join us in learning more about Lincoln, the lawyer.

The Sangamon County Genealogical Society Office Library is located at 2856 South 11th Street, Springfield, Illinois – Phone: 217-529-0542 – Email: Dbutton2@aol.com. Open Tuesday Nights 6:00 to 8:30 or by appointment – Web Address: http://www.rootsweb.com/~ilsangam/

PRESERVATION DURHAM LUNCH AND LEARN – For 2007-2008, Lunch and Learn returns to Tosca Ristorante Italiano in West Village. Programs will be presented the third Wednesday of each month September-November, 2007 and January-May, 2008. Call them at 919-682-3036.

Individual event tickets are $18 for Preservation Durham members; $16 for senior members; and $20 for others. Season passes will also be available for $108 only to Preservation Durham members. Reservations are required – please contact the Preservation Durham office by the Friday before each program if you plan to attend. Last year, many events sold out, so call early! We accept telephone prepayment by Mastercard or Visa!

March 19: Dying in Durham: Funeral Customs and Traditions in the Bull City Sponsorships available.

LOGAN UTAH GENEALOGY & FAMILY HERITAGE JAMBOREE – March 22, 2008 – Eccles Conference Center – On the campus of Utah State University, Logan, Utah – Sponsored by: The Logan Regional Family History Center and My Ancestors Found This one day event is drawing speakers and vendors from all over the U.S. It will feature 36+ terrific classes to choose from, more than 20 vendors and exhibitors, and the latest genealogy products and technology. Drawings for prizes will take place all day long with grand prize drawings at the end of the conference! Admission to the exhibit hall and keynote address is FREE to the public, and classes will be offered for a minimal fee. The complete class schedule and exhibit hall map are available at www.MyAncestorsFound.com. Pre-register online at www.MyAncestorsFound.com <http://www.myancestorsfound.com/> , by phone at 801.829.3295, or send a check to: My Ancestors Found; PO Box 187; Morgan, UT 84050. Questions? Email: kimberly@myancestorsfound.com or call Holly at 866.701.5071

WAKE COUNTY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY – the March meeting will be held on 25 March at the Olivia Raney Library. Topic: “Land Records 1650–1950” – Featured Speaker: Dr. Larry Odzak

GENEALOGY COMPUTER SOFTWARE WORKSHOPS – Carl Sandburg College’s Branch in Carthage, Illinois, will be offering two separate all-day, hands-on genealogy computer workshops in the spring of 2008.

They are:

- Family Tree Maker 2008 on 29 March 2008

- Free Genealogy Online on 26 April 2008

Registration is on a first-come, first-served basis and is limited ($35 each). Presentations will be made by Michael John Neill. More information on the workshops can be found on our website at: http://www.rootdig.com/carthage.html

COMPUTER GENEALOGY COURSE – 12 April 2008 – Held at St. Charles Community College, St. Peters, MO. Co-sponsored by the St. Charles County Genealogical Society and St. Charles Community College. Presenter: Michael John Neill, columnist for Ancestry.com. Michael has led research trips to Ft. Wayne and Salt Lake City and lectures nationally on a wide variety of genealogy topics

During the workshop, you will discover original records on FOOTNOTE.COM and how to access them. Each person will have a computer and free access during the workshop.

Registration Fees: SCCGS Member, SCC students, faculty, staff: $30 – General Public: $40.

For more information: http://www.rootdig.com/stchas2008.htm. Questions? Email Michael John Neill at mjnrootdig@gmail.com or Jo Schnare wschnare@mail.win.org

HUMOR

Martha and Edna, two widows, were talking.

Martha said, “That nice George Johnson asked me out for a date. I know you went out with him last week, and I wanted to talk with you about him before I give him my answer.”

Edna said, “Well, I’ll tell you. He showed up at my apartment punctually at 7 p.m., dressed like such a gentleman in a fine suit. And he brought me such beautiful flowers! Then he took me downstairs, and what’s there but a beautiful car – a limousine, uniformed chauffeur and all. Then he took me out for dinner — marvelous dinner of lobster. Then we went to see a show. Let me tell you, Martha, I enjoyed it so much I could have just died from pleasure! So then we were coming back to my apartment and he turned into an animal. Completely crazy, he tore off my expensive new dress and had his way with me!”

Martha replied, “Goodness gracious! So you are telling me I shouldn’t go out with him?”

Edna said, “No. I’m just saying, wear an old dress.”

PARTING THOUGHT

AN OLD IRISH TOAST – May you never forget what is worth remembering, or remember what is best forgotten.

If you have any items of interest that you would like to submit for future publication, please contact Richard Ellington at mailto:richard_ellington@unc.edu or 919.967.4168

D-OGS, P.O. Box 4703, Chapel Hill, NC 27515-4703 – D-OGS Newsletter – March 2008

News & Articles of interest to Durham-Orange genealogists

D-OGS MEETINGS FOR MARCH 2008

The next D-OGS Meeting will be held on Wednesday evening, 5 March 2008 at 7 p.m. at the Duke Homestead Visitor’s Center, 2828 Duke Homestead Road, Durham, NC 27705. Phone: (919) 477-5498 – One-half mile from I-85 and Guess Rd (Exit 175), Follow the brown historic site road signs.

The 5 March meeting program will be “Roots of Resistance — A Story of the Underground Railroad” PBS Video in The American Experience series.

In the mid-1800s, black men and women traveled a network of escape routes known as the underground railroad. Over dark forest trails, back roads and rivers, they made their way along carefully mapped routes leading to night trains to the north or boats to the south. Their flight from the shackles of slavery in the south was organized by other escaped slaves and their allies.

This program recounts the little-known story of black America’s secret railroad to freedom through narratives of escaped slaves. Viewers listen to interviews with descendents of slaves and slaveholders describing personal danger and terrible risks involved in each slave’s departure. After the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850, even a successful flight to free territory didn’t guarantee freedom from professional slave catchers who hunted down these men and women and returned them to a life of bondage on southern plantations.

The D-OGS Computer Interest Group (CIG) Meeting will meet on Saturday morning, 15 March 2008 at 9 a.m. at the Chapel Hill Library downstairs in the small conference room of the Chapel Hill Public Library, 100 Library Drive, Chapel Hill, NC. For the March meeting we will be discussing an article from “INTERNET Genealogy”, February/March 2008 entitled “Creating the Context for Your Ancestors’ Lives” by Leslie Huber, and following some of the author’s leads in strolling through history via our computers. We will then look at sites CIG members send me before the meeting that have been the greatest help or interest to them that we would not ordinarily be familiar with. It is important that folks send me the URLs early enough to be included in the agenda so the meeting moves along evenly, so dig back and remember where it was that you found that special bit of information and share it with us.

We’ll also use a Google trick to get news from your hometown sent right to your desktop every day so you won’t miss a trick. How do you keep track of what’s going on there? Tell us.

D-OGS MEETING MINUTES – FEBRUARY 6, 2008

The meeting was called to order at 7:07 PM.

The evening’s program was “NC Dialects” and the speaker was Dr. Walt Wolfram of North Carolina State in Raleigh. He is the William C. Friday Distinguished Professor, Coordinator of Linguistics at NC State and specializes in language variation and social and ethnic dialects.

To find out more about the Linguistics Program at NC State visit http://www.ncsu.edu/linguistics/

Dr. Wolfram explained the various causes of the development of dialects, such as:

• The Founder Effect—the first settlers leave a lasting imprint on the language and dialect traditions.

• Patterns of Migration

• Historical Events—there were wider differences in dialects between the North and South after the Civil War.

• Population Shift

He said there was a strong genealogical/language connection and understanding the dialects of a region could help in reading old documents.

He said there are 15 areas in North Carolina where they go in and interview the oldest people and then younger ones in the same family to see the patterns of speech and how they have changed over the generations.

He said the Outer Banks was a prime example of the Founder Effect and that “y’all” started in the south and was an independent development.

Dr. Wolfram said when they study the cities of North Carolina they study the settlement history, the shifting population and the Yankee effect. He cited Duke as an example where the Yankee students have a different pronunciation of the school name then the Southern students.

He played us various pieces from the DVDs that have been compiled by the North Carolina Language and Life Project (NCLLP) so that we could hear the differences region to region and from old to young. They have books, VHS tapes, CDs and DVDs available for purchase from the various areas of North Carolina. Information about them is available at www.talkingnc.com

Dr. Wolfram received an enthusiastic round of applause for his fascinating program and then he packed up to get home to watch the Duke/NC game.

Paul Hollinghurst announced that we would get through the business meeting quickly so everyone who was interested could get home in time to watch the game.

The minutes for January 2008 were approved as published in the Newsletter.

Rob Elias announced that the Trading Path was completed and Cathy would hand them out to everyone attending the meeting on their way out the door. He said they planned to have the next issue of the Trading Path completed in a few months and that Kathy had three articles she needed volunteers to type up. Fran Ferrell volunteered to type up all three.

Rob also reminded those in attendance that NGS would be held in Raleigh in May 2009 and he would like to work out a time that D-OGS can sponsor a luncheon and invite our out of town members to attend. He also said there would be a great need for us to volunteer for a variety of tasks (of course, our out of town members could also serve as volunteers).

Elizabeth Hamilton said the program for March 5 will be “The Underground Railroad”. She will show a video from PBS which contains a number of references to North Carolina sites.

Ann had submitted a Treasurer’s Report to Paul. Our current balance is $5371.94.

All business having been concluded, we dismissed at 8:39 PM.

Respectfully submitted,

Tonya Krout

Secretary

For those you who aren’t able to attend a meeting, I wanted to inform you that Paul usually prints a useful form or information on the back of the Agenda and includes the source. This month’s form struck me as particularly helpful. It is “Source Summary for Family Information” and he gave the source as: http://helpdesk.rootsweb.com/get_started/charts_forms.html

D-OGS CIG SUMMARY – FEBRUARY 2008

Questions and problems you’re having:

How to search a wife in NC who went alone to MD before 1850 census could show her location? We discussed a number of resources that might provide some answers such as deeds, wills and distributions, church records, and witnesses of these transactions who share surnames with the target family. We also recommended the use of TMG as a research tool that might narrow the search with the use of roles and witnesses.

What’s New?

A New Blog for Genealogists -http://genealogyandfamilyhistory.com/

Vista- http://www.microsoft.com/windows/products/windowsvista/facts.mspx

TMG Questions:

Transfer from 6.0 to 7.0 remains problematic in some cases. File sent to TMG support.

Web sites worth visiting:

Census Tools (forms) – http://www.censustools.com/

MapCard- http://www.mapcard.com/

Greg Boyd’s River Map Research – http://www.familymaps.com/rivers/index.html

Railroad Station Historical Society- http://www.rrshs.org/index.html

Civil War Album – http://www.civilwaralbum.com/index.html

Lost and Found Photos – http://www.lostandfoundphotos.net/

Patents through Google -http://www.google.com/patents

Find People – http://www.monash.com/people.html

Diigo – http://www.diigo.com/

NY Vital Records – http://stevemorse.org/vital/nymarriages.html?index=groom

Pharos Genealogy Courses – http://www.pharostutors.com/?sssdmh=dm13.158184

Eclectic Web Sites:

Sizes – Society Richardson Scale of Deadly Quarrels – http://www.sizes.com/indexSR.htm

Neat things from the web that any genealogist can use:

Google Books – http://books.google.com

Burling Books – http://home.comcast.net/~jane81/

Topic Du Jour:

Utilizing a Range of Search Engines to meet our needs

New York Times Newsroom Navigator – http://tech.nytimes.com/top/news/technology/cybertimesnavigator/index.html/

Searching the Net? Here Are Places to Start:

Google Search, mail, maps and more. It includes a search of Usenet discussions, a government search, an image search, maps, local listings and Google Scholar for scholarly literature – http://www.google.com/ig?hl=en

Yahoo! Search, news, e-mail, shopping, and many other services – http://www.yahoo.com/

Vivisimo searches and categorizes results helpfully – http://vivisimo.com/

A9, from Amazon, adds some interesting twists to Web search – http://www.a9.com/

Alta Vista now from Overture, includes audio and video search – http://www.altavista.com/

The Open Directory Project aims to become the largest Web directory edited by (volunteer) humans – http://www.dmoz.org/

All the Web, from Fast Search, is quick and simple – http://www.alltheweb.com/

Ask.com has Web search and several other useful search features – http://www.ask.com/

Ixquick, Excite, Dogpile, CNet Search.com and Metacrawler simultaneously search different combinations of multiple Web search engines

http://www.ixquick.com/

http://www.excite.com/

http://www.dogpile.com/

http://www.search.com/

http://www.metacrawler.com/

Reporter’s Desktop conveniently consolidates many ways to find people and things – http://www.reporter.org/desktop/

Librarians’ Index to the Internet Useful sites organized and annotated by librarians in California and Washington – http://lii.org/

About.com has humans who assemble mini-sites on a wide variety of topics – http://www.about.com/

Searchmil.com searches for information in military (.mil) computers – http://www.searchmil.com/

The Hardin Meta Directory catalogs health-related sites – http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/hardin/md/

Topica and Tile.Net will help you find Internet mailing lists – http://lists.topica.com/ & http://www.tile.net/

NCGS THIRD ANNUAL SPEAKERS FORUM

The North Carolina Genealogical Society & the Olivia Raney Local and Family History Library are sponsoring the Third Annual Speakers Forum on 12 April 2008 in Raleigh, North Carolina at the Wake County Commons Building at 4011 Carya Drive. General, intermediate and advanced level presentations include “Writing Your Ancestor ’s Story: a Civil War Case Study (Catherine Elias); “Using the Neighbors to Find your Ancestors (Monica Hopkins); “Using ‘Web 2.0’ to Share and Collaborate on Genealogy (Jordan Jones); “Orphans and Scholars: Genealogical Records Relating to Children (Victor Jones); “Raleigh in the War Years 1861-1865” (Kevin Milus); “The Digital CSR: Saunders and Clark (and Weeks) in the Internet Age” (Jason Tomberlin); “Explore NC through maps from the comfort of your home!” (Diane Richard); “People Finders for North Carolina” (Jeffrey Haines); and “Money in 18th Century Colonial America” (Jim Jones). Information and Registration: http://www.ncgenealogy.org.

You will note that our own Cathy Elias is a featured speaker this year. Registration forms will be available at the March meeting. You may also print a registration form at http://ncgenealogy.org/Events/2008/2008%20Speaker’s%20Forum.pdf.

Registrants may choose from two lectures during most of the time slots. The programs run from 8:30 until 4:00. The cost is $30 for NCGS members and $40 for non-members. There is a $5 early bird discount if you register before 3 April. A box lunch will be provided for an extra $10.

NEWS FROM THE TRADING PATH ASSOCIATION (TPA)

NC “Migration Trails” Project Starts in 2008 – The NC Department of Commerce has asked the TPA to organize a state-wide array of “Migration Trails”. The first of these will be the Great Wagon Road. This will be a proof of product project to debug the method to be used and demonstrate feasibility. We will engage historians, tourism, economic development, and other planning persons in every county along each trail. They will basically define their assets. The TPA will develop the over-all trail and assist as needed with reconciling interpretations. This promises to be a wonderful project, a great challenge and an excellent opportunity for the TPA. Once we’ve demonstrated and debugged the process of development we believe we’ll be able to apply the process to almost every North Carolina county as we have thus far identified at least a dozen old trade routes that evolved into migration routes into the Old North State ranging from the Dismal Swamp Trail of the Quakers and Green’s Path and the Great Central Coast Road in the East, to the Unicol Trail and Rutherford’s Trail in the west, with a handful of Occaneechi, Catawba, Waxhaw, Cheraw, and Saura Trails in between.

If you are aware of an old trade route in your county, advocate for it with us and, eventually, with your county politicos and economic development folk. Heritage tourism is without a doubt the best bang for the buck economic development available for most NC counties.

TPA MARCH 2008 FIRST SUNDAY HIKE AT MOOREFIELDS

We will meet at Moorefields, a historic plantation west of Hillsborough off Dimmocks Mill Road for our March First Sunday hike. As usual, we will gather in time for a 2:00 PM departure and we’ll be back at our cars again by 4:00PM. Moorefields is a fascinating site as it seems it was sited on a couple of strategically important roads that have since faded from sight. They are now absorbed into Interstate 85 headed for Petersburg, VA, and Interstate 40 headed down the Neuse-Cape Fear watershed for the sounds. We think John Lawson must have over-nighted in an Occaneechi town near hear on the edge of the Haw Fields.

We’ll see old roadbeds, house sites, and an old cemetery along with a ford or two. Most of the hike will be brush free and on relatively smooth though unimproved ground. Wear sturdy shoes.

ANOTHER LOCAL CEMETERY “BITES THE DUST”

It seems that the Markham-Christian Family cemetery at 1013 Watts Street may have been intentionally destroyed or illegally moved. This tragedy was reported awhile back in the Durham Herald-Sun but apparently nothing has been done to rectify the situation. See the details at http://endangereddurham.blogspot.com/2007/12/mcmanhandled-when-your-footers-need-to.html . This cemetery was identified several years ago, surveyed and is listed in Allen Dew’s Cemetery Census (http://cemeterycensus.com/nc/durh/cem060.html). Many questions remain about the conditions under which the cemetery was removed. Have the remains been moved to a new location? If so there seems to be no formal record of it.

If you live in Durham, please contact one of your council members and ask them to look into this. The way this cemetery has been treated is shameful. Local authorities should be asked to make some accounting for these actions.

COLONIAL NORTH CAROLINA RECORDS

During the American Revolution, North Carolina confiscated the real estate of residents who refused to support the Revolution. Seizure of this property was an answer to an ongoing war debt. The government offered the land for sale to anyone who would take an oath of allegiance to the state. If you have an ancestor who received a land warrant in North Carolina during or after 1779, you probably have proof that he or she supported the Revolution.

The NC Archives have microfilmed most of these land records. They are a fairly large body of work. For instance, the land warrants, plats and related documents for the counties of Richmond, Robeson, Rockingham, Rowan and Rutherford fill 58 rolls.

MISSOURI STATE ARCHIVES

By John Dougan, Missouri State Archivist

(I thought this article might be of interest to some D-OGS because I know that some of you are doing research in Missouri. Ed.)

The Missouri State Archives, a division of Secretary of State Robin Carnahan’s office, provides genealogists, historians, and the general public with access to the state’s historic public records. These holdings, dating from 1770, include records from all branches and agencies in state government.

The Archives holds more than 463 million pages of records on paper and microfilm, 500,000 photographs, and 9,000 maps. Resources for family and community history research include over 50,000 reels of county and local government records on microfilm. Included in these records are marriages, deeds, wills, circuit and probate records, county court minutes, early birth and death records and much more. The Archives also holds a significant collection of local history publications and more than one thousand family histories donated by local historians and genealogists.

The Archives takes pride in providing exceptional patron service and pursuing innovative programs and initiatives. Since 2000, the institution has regularly received national recognition. Among these honors are two grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities to preserve St. Louis Circuit Court case files. The American Association for State and Local History has recognized the Archives with three Awards of Merit, most recently in 2007 for its online Death Certificate Database, which contains over two million death certificates issued from 1910 to 1956. Each of the past five years, Family Tree Magazine has named the Archives’ website (www.sos.mo.gov/archives) one of the top family history research websites in the nation.

Volunteers have been important contributors to the success of the Archives’ programs. Without their help, the quantity of records available online would be limited by staff time. A great deal of indexing and transcription has been accomplished by volunteers, freeing professional staff to acquire, arrange, and describe even more collections. All volunteers are valued, but the e-volunteer program, where records are photocopied and mailed to volunteers for data entry, is particularly vital to making records accessible. Over the years, more than 1200 people in 43 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and three foreign countries have answered appeals from the Archives for volunteer assistance. Anyone wishing to participate in future volunteer projects can contact the Missouri State Archives at archvol@sos.mo.gov.

Excitement about the work of the Archives further increased in 2007 when Secretary Carnahan announced the Missouri Digital Heritage Initiative, a state funded program designed to further enhance access to records. The initiative, set to launch in early 2008, will dramatically expand Missouri’s historical profile via the Internet, making available full-text records, historical maps, photographs and entire record series. Participation in the initiative is not limited to the Secretary of State’s office; local and regional historical societies and libraries are also invited to share their historical treasures with Missouri and the world. More information on the initiative and how to participate is available at missouridigitalheritage.com.

Please visit the Archives’ website and the website of Missouri Digital Heritage. I hope to see you at the National Genealogical Society Conference in Kansas City.

(Originally published in UpFront with NGS, The Online Newsletter of the National Genealogical Society. http://www.NGSgenealogy.org/upfront.htm)

MORE GOOD NEWS FOR RESEARCH IN THE MISSOURI AREA

Begin making plans now to visit historic Independence, Missouri for the May opening of the new Midwest Genealogy Center. The $8 million, 50,000 square foot facility will occupy 8 acres at 3401 S. Kiger Road in Independence.

Holdings will offer extensive microfilm and microfiche sources, including U. S. census records, Civil War histories, Native American records, biographical archives and Black family history records, and a large variety of state records for Missouri and other states. These include tax records, penitentiary records, military service records, passenger lists, records of antebellum southern plantations, genealogical periodicals, 60,000 titles of families genealogies, local and state histories and other vital records. For more information, call 816-252-7228 or go to www.mcpl.lib.mo.us/branch/ge/.

(Thanks to Paul Hollinghurst for finding this info and passing it along)

MARSHFIELD, WISCONSIN PUBLIC LIBRARY ADDS ONLINE GENEALOGY INDEX

The Marshfield, Wisconsin Public Library has completed a 20 year project: an online local genealogy database. If you had ancestors in the Marshfield area, this is a great new resource.

This database represents over 20 years of work by many individuals. Volunteers representing the Marshfield Area Genealogy Group and Marshfield Public Library culled through microfilm newspapers for records of births, deaths and marriages. Their efforts were complemented by the work of GreenThumb/Experience Works/Senior Aides worker, Hilly Weimert. Work on the index is continuous, with new events added each month. This online index covers over 200,000 events reported in the Marshfield, Wisconsin area newspapers.

Anyone who’s interested in their family history can go online and research an index of more than 200,000 events, including anything that was documented in local newspapers dating back to before the 1920′s. It includes records of births, deaths, and marriages.

The online index is available at http://209.94.183.10/website/services_vdb.htm. If you visit the library, you can actually see the original newspaper article that mentions your family member.

(I know we have some D-OGS members who are doing research in Wisconsin, so I thought this may be of interest to those folks. This article is from Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright 2007 by Richard W. Eastman. It is re-published here with the permission of the author. Information about the newsletter is available at http://www.eogn.com.)

SEARCH THE VIRTUAL SURNAME WALL

(The following was written by Paula Hinkel of the Southern California Genealogical Society)

We are very pleased to announce the roll-out of the searchable Virtual Surname Wall database, sponsored by the Southern California Genealogical Society. The Virtual Surname Wall is free and open for use by all family historians and genealogists. You need not be a member of SCGS to participate.

Although it took a little longer than we anticipated or wished, entries from over a thousand genealogists from around the world are now searchable by family name, by geographic region, and by each participant’s Submitter ID.

Access the Virtual Surname Wall at www.SCGSGenealogy.com. To see if any of your surnames are listed:

1. Click on the link to “Search the Virtual Surname Wall”.

2. Search by surname, location, or Submitter ID or any combination of the three. It is a “begins with” search. For example, if you search for the last name Mill, it will return the names beginning with the letters Mill. (i.e., Millan, Millard, Miller).

3. Be sure to read the search tips that are listed on the search page.

If you haven’t yet added your names to the database, or if you want to add more:

1. Have your family information available for reference.

2. Click on the link to “Add Your Surnames”

3. Enter the following information for each surname you are reporting:

a. Surnames (including spelling variations).

b. Geographic area in which they lived, or the migration path.

i. List your geographic information in order by city, county, state and country. To avoid confusion, please do not use two-letter state abbreviations.

c. Time Frame. Use abbreviations (approx., or abt., or ca.) to indicate approximate time frames.

4. Submit as many names as you want. Each entry screen will accept up to 10 surnames but you can enter multiple screens. If you get a message that the survey has already been completed, just click “Take the survey again” and continue adding names. You may add ancestors from any geographic location worldwide.

As entries are added to the database, the Virtual Surname Wall will become an even more valuable resource for family historians and genealogy researchers. You will not immediately see new entries but will be notified when they have been added to the Virtual Surname Wall. Check back often to look for a match.

Your participation in the Virtual Surname Wall project is completely voluntary. Your contact information is not displayed online. You have the option of asking SCGS to serve as intermediary, or authorizing SCGS to release your contact information in the event that we receive an inquiry regarding a possible family connection.

Please feel free to forward this email to your cousins, friends, fellow genealogists or others who would be interested in the Virtual Surname Wall project. Genealogy and historical societies are welcome to post this announcement in newsletters or journals. Reprint permission is granted but please include contact information (phinkel@scgsgenealogy.com). We thank you for your contributions to the Virtual Surname Wall. Here’s to making lots of connections!

P.S. – and while you’re at the website, check out the program for the 2008 Genealogy Jamboree, which will be held June 27-29 in Burbank, California!

ONTARIO GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY WORKSHOPS

If you have relatives or ancestors in Canada, you may be interested in these workshops. Of course, it means you will need to go to Canada.

The Toronto Branch of the Ontario Genealogical Society is offering an array of courses in the Winter/Spring 2008 season for genealogists at all levels of expertise. For course program and registration information, please visit http://www.torontofamilyhistory.org/courses.html.

DID CLIMATE CHANGE KILL YOUR ANCESTORS?

In June 1783 the Laki volcano in Iceland began to erupt, producing in the months that followed clouds of volcanic gases 80 times greater than in the Mount St Helens eruption of 1980. The impact of the gases on the climate was far-reaching – in the eastern United States the winter of 1783-84 was almost 9 degrees (Fahrenheit) colder than average, and icebergs floated down the Mississippi into the Gulf of Mexico.

Half of the horses and cattle, and three-quarters of the sheep on Iceland died, but the death and destruction was far more widespread. It has been estimated that 23,000 people died in England as a result of the eruption – in parts there were twice as many deaths as in a normal summer – and some historians believe that as many of 5% of the French population died in a single year.

Could any of your ancestors been affected?

(I picked up this little tidbit from the “LostCousins” newsletter)

WEBSITES OF POSSIBLE INTEREST

US GEOLOGICAL SURVEY MAPS AND RESOURCES ONLINE – For information on tracking down historical maps, go to http://mac.usgs.gov/isb/pubs/factsheets/fs15499.html.

Details on finding old aerial photographs can be found at http://erg.usgs.gov/isb/pubs/factsheets/fs12796.html.

Unfamiliar names of towns or places – for example, towns that no longer exist – can be searched at http://geonames.usgs.gov/.

Additional information on using USGS resources for genealogy can be found at http://erg.usgs.gov/isb/pubs/factsheets/fs09902.html.

GOT RELATIVES IN NEW JERSEY? – The Hudson County Genealogical Society is pleased to offer this database of the official list of Bayonne servicemen who were killed or died in service during World War I, courtesy of member Bill Miller.

For more information, please visit the Hudson County Genealogical Society Web site at www.hudsoncountynjgenealogy.org and click the “Databases” button.

Coming Soon! Bill Miller’s index to over 13,000 Death Notices published in the Bayonne Times from 1917-1939. Keep Checking!

BOOKS OF POSSIBLE INTEREST

ORANGE COUNTY, N.C. ABSTRACTS OF THE MINUTES OF THE PLEAS AND QUARTERS SESSIONS OF SEPT.1752 – AUG. 1766 – this volume contains the only remaining court records for the Colonial era of this county on the migration route from Pennsylvania south to Georgia. $30 – from the Southern Historical Press, P.O. Box 1267, Greenville, SC 29602-1267 or call 800-233-0152.

CALENDAR OF UPCOMING EVENTS

BLACK HISTORY PROGRAM AT BURWELL SCHOOL – February 28 – The Hillsborough Literary Association welcomes Judge Beverly Scarlett at 7:30 p.m. for a talk focusing on the history of African-Americans in Hillsborough at the Burwell School Historic Site.

CARL SANDBURG COLLEGE WORKSHOPS – Carl Sandburg College in Galesburg, Illinois is proud to announce its offerings for our 10th annual “Genealogy Computing Week” 3 through 8 March 2008. This weeklong series of genealogy computer workshops will be held in our state of the art computer labs with limited enrollment.

Offerings for 2008 are:

• Using Footnote.com

• Using Ancestry.com

• FTM 2008

• RootsMagic

• Free Genealogy Online

Registration is limited to keep class size small and is on a first come, first served basis. Registration is $35 per day (the same as 10 years ago), includes the handout, but not lunch.

More details are on our site at: http://www.rootdig.com/sandburg.html including where Galesburg, Illinois, USA is and how to get there. Questions can be sent to me off list at mjnrootdig@gmail.com.

SOUTHERN GENEALOGIST’S EXCHANGE SOCIETY SPRING SEMINAR – March 8th, 2008. “Bringing Your Ancestors to Life” is a day-long workshop designed to help genealogists and others write a family history. The workshop focuses on several different approaches to writing a family narrative including documenting the journey, character sketches, and using “faction” to bring interest to your account while staying accurate. The goal of the workshop is to give participants options to transform volumes of research into readable narratives. No previous writing experience is necessary. The seminar/workshop is presented by Patricia Charpentier of Orlando, Florida. Mrs. Charpentier holds an M.A. in Creative Writing from the University of Central Florida and a B.A. in journalism from Louisiana State University. She has worked as a memoirist, writing coach, editor, instructor, journalist and photographer.

The early bird fee is $25.00 (including lunch) through the month of February. On March 1, the fee will convert to $35.00 without lunch guaranteed. Seminar location is Riverside Presbyterian Church, Bittinger Hall, 849 Park Street, Jacksonville. Registration 8:30AM Seminar 9:00-4:00 Call today to register at (904)778-1000 or (904) 333-5222. Seating is limited.

Contact Person: Betty Reed, President, The Southern Genealogist’s Exchange Society, Inc. , 6215 Sauterne Drive, Jacksonville, Florida 32210 – (904) 778-1000 (Tues-Thurs & Sat 10:00AM to 3:PM) Staffed by volunteers – (904) 262-1948 Home Phone – (904) 333-5222 Cell Phone – email: president@sgesjax.com

ILLINOIS HUMANITIES COUNCIL ROAD SCHOLARS’ SPEAKERS PROGRAM – The Sangamon County, Illinois Genealogical Society and The Illinois Humanities Council Road Scholars’ Speakers Program will present: Guy Fraker who will speak on “Abraham Lincoln and the Eighth Judicial Circuit” Monday, March 10, 2008. The meeting will be held at Springfield, Illinois’ public library, The Lincoln Library, which is located at 326 South 7th Street, Springfield, Illinois. The library’s phone number is 217-753-4900. The meeting begins at 7:00 pm, the program follows shortly thereafter. Everyone is welcome to attend the meeting. Come join us in learning more about Lincoln, the lawyer.

The Sangamon County Genealogical Society Office Library is located at 2856 South 11th Street, Springfield, Illinois – Phone: 217-529-0542 – Email: Dbutton2@aol.com. Open Tuesday Nights 6:00 to 8:30 or by appointment – Web Address: http://www.rootsweb.com/~ilsangam/

PRESERVATION DURHAM LUNCH AND LEARN – For 2007-2008, Lunch and Learn returns to Tosca Ristorante Italiano in West Village. Programs will be presented the third Wednesday of each month September-November, 2007 and January-May, 2008. Call them at 919-682-3036.

Individual event tickets are $18 for Preservation Durham members; $16 for senior members; and $20 for others. Season passes will also be available for $108 only to Preservation Durham members. Reservations are required – please contact the Preservation Durham office by the Friday before each program if you plan to attend. Last year, many events sold out, so call early! We accept telephone prepayment by Mastercard or Visa!

March 19: Dying in Durham: Funeral Customs and Traditions in the Bull City Sponsorships available.

LOGAN UTAH GENEALOGY & FAMILY HERITAGE JAMBOREE – March 22, 2008 – Eccles Conference Center – On the campus of Utah State University, Logan, Utah – Sponsored by: The Logan Regional Family History Center and My Ancestors Found This one day event is drawing speakers and vendors from all over the U.S. It will feature 36+ terrific classes to choose from, more than 20 vendors and exhibitors, and the latest genealogy products and technology. Drawings for prizes will take place all day long with grand prize drawings at the end of the conference! Admission to the exhibit hall and keynote address is FREE to the public, and classes will be offered for a minimal fee. The complete class schedule and exhibit hall map are available at www.MyAncestorsFound.com. Pre-register online at www.MyAncestorsFound.com <http://www.myancestorsfound.com/> , by phone at 801.829.3295, or send a check to: My Ancestors Found; PO Box 187; Morgan, UT 84050. Questions? Email: kimberly@myancestorsfound.com or call Holly at 866.701.5071

WAKE COUNTY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY – the March meeting will be held on 25 March at the Olivia Raney Library. Topic: “Land Records 1650–1950” – Featured Speaker: Dr. Larry Odzak

GENEALOGY COMPUTER SOFTWARE WORKSHOPS – Carl Sandburg College’s Branch in Carthage, Illinois, will be offering two separate all-day, hands-on genealogy computer workshops in the spring of 2008.

They are:

- Family Tree Maker 2008 on 29 March 2008

- Free Genealogy Online on 26 April 2008

Registration is on a first-come, first-served basis and is limited ($35 each). Presentations will be made by Michael John Neill. More information on the workshops can be found on our website at: http://www.rootdig.com/carthage.html

COMPUTER GENEALOGY COURSE – 12 April 2008 – Held at St. Charles Community College, St. Peters, MO. Co-sponsored by the St. Charles County Genealogical Society and St. Charles Community College. Presenter: Michael John Neill, columnist for Ancestry.com. Michael has led research trips to Ft. Wayne and Salt Lake City and lectures nationally on a wide variety of genealogy topics

During the workshop, you will discover original records on FOOTNOTE.COM and how to access them. Each person will have a computer and free access during the workshop.

Registration Fees: SCCGS Member, SCC students, faculty, staff: $30 – General Public: $40.

For more information: http://www.rootdig.com/stchas2008.htm. Questions? Email Michael John Neill at mjnrootdig@gmail.com or Jo Schnare wschnare@mail.win.org

HUMOR

Martha and Edna, two widows, were talking.

Martha said, “That nice George Johnson asked me out for a date. I know you went out with him last week, and I wanted to talk with you about him before I give him my answer.”

Edna said, “Well, I’ll tell you. He showed up at my apartment punctually at 7 p.m., dressed like such a gentleman in a fine suit. And he brought me such beautiful flowers! Then he took me downstairs, and what’s there but a beautiful car – a limousine, uniformed chauffeur and all. Then he took me out for dinner — marvelous dinner of lobster. Then we went to see a show. Let me tell you, Martha, I enjoyed it so much I could have just died from pleasure! So then we were coming back to my apartment and he turned into an animal. Completely crazy, he tore off my expensive new dress and had his way with me!”

Martha replied, “Goodness gracious! So you are telling me I shouldn’t go out with him?”

Edna said, “No. I’m just saying, wear an old dress.”

PARTING THOUGHT

AN OLD IRISH TOAST – May you never forget what is worth remembering, or remember what is best forgotten.

If you have any items of interest that you would like to submit for future publication, please contact Richard Ellington at mailto:richard_ellington@unc.edu or 919.967.4168

D-OGS, P.O. Box 4703, Chapel Hill, NC 27515-4703 – http://www.ncgenweb.us/dogsnc

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