Category: Announcements

The Durham Daily Globe newspaper to be digitized

By , March 20, 2013

chronam2

North Carolina is participating in the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP), a partnership between the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the Library of Congress (LC) which is endeavoring to digitize historic newspapers across the country in order to make them available online for research.

The Durham Daily Globe will be included in the list of titles to be digitized in 2013.

The Durham Daily Globe started in Durham, North Carolina in 1889 by publisher Edward A. Oldham. It was published daily with an additional Durham Sunday Globe published on Sundays from 1889 to 1894.

It had previously been called The Daily Tobacco Plant (1888-1889) and the Durham Daily Recorder (1886-188?).

Following 1894 the title changed to The Globe-Herald, the Morning Herald, and the Durham Weekly Globe. 

If you can’t wait until 2014 when the digital copies of this newspaper will be posted online to the Library of Congress’ Chronicling America site, you can view the microfilmed copies of this newspaper  at the following locations:

Duke University Library, Durham County Library, East Carolina University, the North Carolina State Archives, the State Library of North Carolina, and UNC-CH.

“Mastering Genealogical Proof” by Thomas Jones

By , March 18, 2013

Mastering Genealogical Proof

from the National Genealogical Society website: 

Pre-order your copy today of this essential guide to genealogical  research today. The National Genealogical Society presents this important work as part of its Special Topic series.
As a unique textbook on genealogical methods and reasoning in the twentyfirst century, Mastering Genealogical Proof guides readers in acquiring genealogical skills transcending chronological, ethnic, geopolitical, and religious boundaries.

About the Book and Author

Mastering Genealogical Proof aims to help researchers, students, and new family historians reconstruct relationships and lives of people they cannot see. It presents content in digestible chunks. Each chapter concludes with problems providing practice for  proficiently applying the chapter’s concepts. Those problems, like examples throughout the book, use real records, real research, and real issues. Answers are at the back of the book along with a glossary of technical terms and an extensive resource list.

Thomas W. Jones, who has pursued his family history since he was fifteen, is an award-winning genealogical researcher, writer, editor, and educator.

Contents

  • Preface
  • Chapter 1 – Genealogy’s Standard of Proof
  • Chapter 2 – Concepts Fundamental to the GPS
  • Chapter 3 – GPS Element 1: Thorough Research
  • Chapter 4 GPS Element 2: Source Citations
  • Chapter 5 GPS Element 3: Analysis and Correlation
    Chapter 6 GPS Element 4: Resolving Conflicts and Assembling Evidence
  • Chapter 7 GPS Element 5: The Written Conclusion
  • Chapter 8 – Using the GPS
  • Chapter 9 – Conclusion
  • Appendix A – Pritchett Article
  • Appendix B – McLain Article
  • Glossary
  • Reading and Source List
  • Answers to exercises
See the PDF for the full list of contents. See also a sample exercise.

Ordering Information

You can pre-order your copy of Mastering Genealogical Proof today. Order online (payment in full required at time of pre-order). Cost is $25 for NGS members and $30 for non-members.

Mastering Genealogical Proof will also be available for purchase at the NGS 2013 Family History Conference, 8-11 May, where Thomas W. Jones will hold two book signing events.

Estimated Ship Date: 20 May 2013

January 2013 Newsletter is now available!

By , January 14, 2013

The January 2013 newsletter has been published and shared with our members and is now posted to the website.  You can find updates on all D-OGS events including upcoming meetings and minutes from past meetings, tips and tricks for doing your family history research, events going on in North Carolina and throughout the United States, and queries that have been submitted by folks looking for ancestors in Durham and Orange County, just to name a few.

Check it out!

January Newsletter

 

Newspapers to be digitized in 2013!

By , January 2, 2013

newspaperDigital NC, the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center, has announced a new round of newspapers that are slated to be digitized in 2013 and contributed to the North Carolina Newspapers project. Among them is Durham’s own The Carolina Times  from 1965 – 1972. Digital NC is a statewide digitization and digital publishing program housed in the North Carolina Collection at UNC-CH. They work with libraries, historical societies, genealogy societies, and archives across North Carolina to digitize and publish historic materials online in order to provide access to the materials.

Here is a list of several other newspapers slated to be digitized in 2013:

Title Years Nominating Institution
The Enterprise (Williamston) 1901-1932 Martin Memorial Library
Forest City Courier 1919-1931 Rutherford County Public Library
Danbury Reporter 1872-1945 Danbury Public Library
Elkin Tribune 1930-1940 Elkin Public Library
Central Times (Dunn) 1891-1895 Harnett County Public Library
County Union (Dunn) 1897-1899 Harnett County Public Library
Democratic Banner (Dunn) 1901-1902 Harnett County Public Library
Rocky Mount Herald 1934-1938 Braswell Memorial Library
Rocky Mount Mail 1875-1876 Braswell Memorial Library
Press and Carolinian (Hickory) 1887-1892 Catawba County Library
Hickory Democrat 1906-1915 Hickory Public Library
Polk County News (Columbus) 1902-1921 Polk County Public Library
The Carolina Times (Durham) 1965-1972 Durham County Library
Erwin Chatter (Cooleemee) 1944-1954 Davie County Public Library
Cooleemee Journal 1965-1970 Davie County Public Library
Alamance Gleaner (Graham) 1875-1880 Alamance County Public Library

Website Updates

By , January 2, 2013

tomato cartoon

 

As many of you know, our website was compromised back in October and we lost a lot of data. We are currently looking at alternative website hosting services to switch to. In the mean time, I have added back a couple of pages that we lost, including the Surname Page and the Membership Contact page. Please take a look at these pages as they will be converted to the new website in a couple of months. We want to make sure we have the correct email address for each of you in order for you to receive your renewal notifications. Also, if you have surnames you would like to contribute to our Surname list, please email them to me at grs3275 AT yahoo.com [Replace the "AT" with the @ symbol]. The links to these pages are below.

D-OGS Membership Contact List (members-only)

D-OGS Surname  List

Protect Yourself and Your Data – Make Your Computer Safe for Data!

By , December 31, 2012

databackupThe January 2013 D-OGS Meeting will be held on Wednesday evening, January 9th at 7 p.m. at the Christ United Methodist Church offices in Southern Village, south of Chapel Hill on US 15-501. The street address is 105 Market Street, rooms 103 & 105. Here is a map: http://tinyurl.com/cby3fyt. This address is the office building for Christ Church and is across the street from the church. There is parking on the streets around the church and the lot behind the offices.

 

 

The speaker will be long-time D-OGS member Richard Ellington. Richard’s program topic will be: Protect Yourself and Your Data – Make Your Computer Safe for Data! He will be talking about things that you need to do to protect your computer and precious data from damage from all sorts
of potential problems – hardware, software, malware, backups and such.

PLEASE NOTE THE MEETING DATE OF JANUARY 9. THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS FELT
THAT MEETING ON THE DAY AFTER NEW YEAR’S DAY WOULD NOT HAVE VERY HIGH ATTENDANCE AND OPTED TO MOVE THE MEETING DATE TO THE 9TH.

Free Live Broadcast of Presentations from Rootstech 2012

By , January 30, 2012
rootstech
Below is the press release from FamilySearch.org about the presentations that will be streamed live during the Rootstech conference this week in Salt Lake City, UT. Unfortunately, there are no directions on exactly how to access the streaming live video. You can visit the RootsTech.org website for details to be announced. The conference starts on Thursday,  Feb 2nd, 2012, and goes through Saturday, Feb 4th, 2012.  Hopefully they will have directions on how to view the live presentations by then. Usually you just click on the video at the designated time and it chimes in to the live presentation. All times below are Mountain times, so adjust the times accordingly. You can also access all of the syllabi online by clicking on the schedule link and then click on the presentation and then there should be a link to the syllabi which will be downloaded to your pc.

RootsTech Conference Will Broadcast Select Sessions Free Online
SALT LAKE CITY—RootsTech, a leading family history and technology conference held in Salt Lake City, Utah, February 2-4, 2012, announced today that fourteen of its popular sessions will be broadcasted live and complimentary over the Internet. The live broadcasts will give those unable to attend worldwide a sample of this year’s conference content. Interested viewers can watch the live presentations at RootsTech.org. The second-year conference has attracted over 3,000 registered attendees.
The free online sessions include the keynote speakers and a sampling of technology and family history presentations. Following are the fourteen broadcasted sessions and speakers. All times are in Mountain Standard Time (MST):
Thursday, February 2
8:30-10:00 am, Inventing the Future, as a Community (Keynote Address) by Jay L. Verkler
11:00 am-12:00 pm, Do I Trust the Cloud? by D. Joshua Taylor
1:45-2:45 pm, Effective Database Search Tactics by Kory Meyerink
3:00-4:00 pm, Twitter – It’s Not Just “What I Had for Breakfast” Anymore by Thomas MacEntee
4:15-5:15 pm, Eleven Layers of Online Searches by Barbara Renick
Friday, February 3
8:30-9:30 am, Exabyte Social Clouds and Other Monstrosities (Keynote Address) by Josh Coates
9:45-10:45 am, Publish Your Genealogy Online by Laura G. Prescott
11:00 am-12:00 pm, Optimize Your Site for Search Engines by Robert Gardner
1:45-2:45 pm, Genealogists “Go Mobile” by Sandra Crowly
3:00-4:00 pm, Google’s Toolbar and Genealogy by Dave Barney
Saturday, February 4
8:30-9:30 am, Making the Most of Technology to Further the Family History Industry (Keynote Address) by Tim Sullivan and Ancestry.com Panel
9:45-10:45 am Genealogy Podcasts and Blogs 101 by Lisa Louise Cooke
11:00 am-12:00 pm, Future of FamilySearch Family Tree by Ron Tanner
1:45-2:45 pm, Privacy in a Collaborative Environment by Noah Tatuk

Website Update – Queries

By , January 27, 2012

I updated the Query page on the website. It is accessible from the home page as a link across the top. You click on the Queries link and it will take you to the Query page. From the Query page you can 1) Fill out the form to submit a new query or 2) click on the link to “View all Queries on the Website.” The queries page is part of the blog where I post all of the queries that I receive from the online form or ones I receive in email.

Please review these posts periodically because they might contain names of your ancestors or questions on how or where to research persons, places, or records. You can respond to a query by clicking on the “Comments” link at the top of the query post. Or if you cannot get that to work, then send me an email and I will post a reply for you.

I receive quite a few queries and could use some help getting them posted to the website and coordinating with Richard to get them posted in the Newsletter (or the Journal). If you are interested in helping me post queries to the website and/or acting as a liason between people who leave queries and our membership, please let me know. You do not have to live in North Carolina to do this. And you do not have to know how to create webpages either – posting queries is very easy and would be a great learning opportunity for anyone interested in writing a blog!

Ginger

Season 3 of Who Do You Think You Are?

By , January 27, 2012

 

NBC Announces The Celebrities Tracing Their Family Trees On Season Three Of ’Who Do You Think You Are?’ Premiering February 3

UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif.– January 6, 2012– Viewers can take an up-close and personal look inside the family history of some of today’s most beloved and iconic celebrities when NBC’s “Who Do You Think You Are?” returns for its third season on Friday, February 3 (8-9 p.m. ET).

The celebrities who star in the series are Martin Sheen, Marisa Tomei, Blair Underwood, Reba McEntire, Rob Lowe, Helen Hunt, Rita Wilson, Edie Falco, Rashida Jones, Jerome Bettis, Jason Sudeikis and Paula Deen.

The McCulloh Great Tracts by Stewart Dunaway – Feb 1, 2012

By , January 23, 2012
Stewart Dunaway
Stewart Dunaway

Date: February 1, 2012

Time: 7:00pm-9:00pm

Topic: The McCulloh Great Tracts – Their Impact on Genealogy Research

Speaker: Stewart Dunaway

Location: Bennett Place located at 4409 Bennett Memorial Road, Durham,
NC 27705-2307 - (919) 383-4345 - http://www.nchistoricsites.org/bennett/

*Note*  Stewart will sell and sign books at the end of the meeting.

About the topic: 

The McCulloh Great Tracts – and their impact on
genealogy research

Henry McCulloh was a typical adventurer in the realm of colonial
politics and economics. He is said to have been a merchant of London,
and his home was at Turnham Green, Middlesex County. He probably became
interested in North Carolina through his relations with Gabriel
Johnston, to whom he advanced considerable sums of money between 1726
and 1733.  McCulloh’s deepest interest in the New World was that of a
land speculator. In 1737, the Crown delivered to Murray Crymble and
James Huey, trustees for McCulloh, warrants for 1,200,000 acres in North
Carolina, on condition that 6,000 foreign Protestants should be colonized.

Related information about the topic:
http://piedmontwanderings.blogspot.com/2010/01/settlers-in-tract-11.html
http://piedmontwanderings.blogspot.com/2010/01/great-tract-11-and-haw-river.html
http://www.carolana.com/NC/Royal_Colony/nc_royal_colony_henry_mcculloch.html

About the speaker:

Stewart Dunaway, formerly an executive of Siemens Telecom (FL), is
retired and now spends time researching colonial and revolutionary war
history in North Carolina. He has published myriad historical books as
well as genealogy-related material from the State Archives. He has
transcribed over 19,000 records from the Archives, now provided in book
form. His books can be found on the internet at:
http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/sedunaway.
Stewart, his wife Maryellen, and daughter Sarah reside in Hillsborough.

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