The Wartime Letters
of
Andrew Rink
1833-1865


Andrew Rink (1823-13 April 1865)
Married to Anna Emaline Miller, 4 Sept 1852


INDEX

1. August 28th, 1862, Wilmington, NC
2. October 18, 1863, Camp Vance, N.C.
3. October 19, 1863, Camp Vance, N.C.
4. October 20, 1863, Burke County, N.C.
5. October 24, 1963, Camp Vance , N.C.
6. October 28, 1863, Camp Vance, N.C.
7. November 1, 1963, Brandy Station, Va.
8. November 3, 1863, Orange Courthouse, Va.
9. November 16, 1863, Orange Courthouse, Va.
10. November the 24, 1863, Orange Courthouse, Va.
11. December the 5, 1863, Orange Courthouse, Va.
12. December 15, 1863, Orange Courthouse, Va.
13. December, 1863, Orange Courthouse, Va.
14. January 4, 1864, Orange Courthouse, Va.
15. January 11, 1864, Orange Courthouse, Va.
16.  January 28, 1864, Orange Courthouse, VA.
17. February 8, 1864, Orange Courthouse, Va.
18. February 18, 1864, Gordonsville, Va. Gen. hospital
19. February 27, 1864, Gordonsville, Va. Rec'v. hospital
20. March 12, 1864, Gordonsville, Va. Gen. hospital
21. March 20, 1864, Camp Jackson 1st division, Ward K, Richmond, Va.
22. March 31, 1864, Orange Courthouse
23. April 5, 1864, Orange Courthouse
24. April 19, 1864, Orange Courthouse
25. April 24, 1864, Orange Courthouse
26. June 13, 1864, Petersburg, Va.
27. July 15, 1864, near Petersburg, Va.
28. July 26, 1864, Petersburg, Va.
29. August 1, 1864, Petersburg, Va.
30. August, 1864, Petersburg, Va.
31. September 5, 1864, Petersburg, Va.
32. October 3, 1864, Winder Hospital, Richmond, Va.
33. November 11th, 1864, Petersburg, Va.
34. November the 30, 1864, Petersburg, Va.
35. December the 17, 1864, Petersburg, Va.
36. January the 27, 1865, Petersburg, Va.
37. February the 10, 1865, Petersburg, Va.
38. February the 19, 1865, Petersburg, Va.
39. March 4, 1865, Petersburg, Va.
40. March 16th, 1865, Petersburg, Va. (the last letter)
41. Andrew Rink, death notice


Wilmington, NC
August 28th, 1862  (Thursday)
dear Brother

I seat myself to drop you a few lines in answer to your kind letter which
I received a few days (ago) and I was glad to hear that you was well.  We are
both well at this time and I hope that these few lines will find you well and I
can say to you that it is nothing new to be well one day and the next to be sick.

 I was glad to hear that (?torn) was alive yet.  If it is so (?) there is so much news that (?) don’t know (? If) hear the (?) and you have wrote to me that the conscript had left that day.  I am sorry for them for a volunteer has hard times but the conscript will see a heap harder times and they don’t know where they will get to and I am sorry to hear that it is so dry there.  It is the best season here I most ever saw.  There is a heap of rain and some of the prettiest corn I most ever saw between here and Kinston or it was when I was along there and you want to know whether there was any salt to be had here.  There is salt here but it is dear—is twelve dollars a bushel—it had been six and a half a bushel.  There has (? So) yet every (? One)
That comes here for salt and I must come to a close by asking you to write again.

 So no more at present but remain your brothers until death.

Daniel Rinck
Noah Rinck
Andrew Rinck


NC Camp Vance
October the 18 day 1863 (Sunday)

Dear Wife

 I take my seat to drop you a few lines that I am well at present and I hope when this few lines comes to hand they may find you all well.  There is a talk of us leaving here.  I could not get in any camp near here and I would like if you could a got this letter till tomorrow dinner so you could come out to the road and seen me come along the road to the (?company).

 If you hand gathered your corn yet you must do the best you can for I expect I have to go to Raleigh and if the first days I don’t know yet what regiment I will go get to yet.  I haven’t got no chance to take my box and I will leave it at the station and you can get it there if you get this letter in time.  I would like a string for to carry my blanket and other things.

 So no more at this time.

Andrew Rinck
To Emeline Rinck


Camp Vance
October the 19 day 1863 (Monday)

Dear Wife

 This morning I start to Raleigh and then to the 35 regiment.  So if you have any chance to send me a pair of gloves and some other things you know what I will need.

 So no more at this time.  Only remain your dear husband until death.

Andrew Rink
To Emeline Rink


The state of North Carolina  Burke County
October 20, 1863 (Tuesday)

Dear Wife

 I seat myself to drop you a few lines to let you know that I am well at this time hoping that these few lines may find you all well.  I can tell you that we are a going to go to leave today.  We are a going to Raleigh.  I don’t know whether I ever will get to see (you) any more or not but I hope that I will get back again to see you all again.

 I want you to do the best you can about gathering your corn and sowing your wheat.  I tried (to) get a furlough to come home but they would not let me come.  You don’t need to write to me until I write to you again.  I sold my (?) and (?John) will send my thins home that I can’t take along with me and when you hear that I am stationed at a place you can send me some thing if you have a chance.

 I want you to take care of yourself and

(Letter incomplete)


State of NC  Camp Vance near Raleigh
October 24, 1963 (Saturday)

Dear Wife

 I seat myself to drop you a few lines to let you know I am well at this time hoping this may find you in the best of health.

 We have to leave here today or tomorrow.  I could not get into the regiment I wanted to go to and have to go to the 11 regiment.  We don’t know yet what time we will leave here but shortly.  I want you to do the best you can till I get back home if I ever do get home.  We will leave here in a day or 2.  But don’t know what time.  If I am able to know whether I will get the chance to come home yet.  Do not—you need not to try to send me anything at all for they will be no chance.  I don’t (know) whether I will be furloughed until (?) anymore or not but still live in hopes I will.  If you can’t get your (?potatoes) gathered yet you will have to try and gather it about November 1 or the last of October.

 So I must close by saying I would love to see you the best in the world.  So nothing more but remain your loving husband till death.

Andrew Rinck to his
Wife Emeline Rinck


October the 28 1863 (Wednesday)

My dear and loving wife

 I take this opportunity to inform you that I am well at this time and hope that these few lines will find you and family well.  I am at Culpepper Courthouse.  We are quartered in it.  That is in Virginia.  We expect to leave today for Brandey Station about seven miles from here.

 It is hard times here.  Provision is scarce here.  The Yankees vacated this place last Sunday morning.  We left Camp Vance last Saturday night at eleven o’clock.  We got to Weldon on Sunday morning where we got board of another train for Richmond the same evening.  We stayed there until Tuesday morning.  We left there for this place.  We landed here last night.  There was a little fight not far from here last Sunday and lost about twenty.  We drove the Yankees back.

 I cannot tell what regiment I will get to.  I intended to go to the Eleventh regiment.  You need not trouble yourselves much about me.  Try and content yourselves about me.  It is very cold here to what it is about home.

 I have drawed my clothing but have got no bounty.  They say that we get no bounty.  I expect to get into a fight pretty soon after we get there.  They are expecting a fight there.

 You must trade for your salt and things that you need and do the best that you can for if I get any money I will have a bad chance to send it to you…(difficult line to read here)…person to send it by.  We were kept under guard all the way here and are yet.  If I had to pick my choice again I would not make any choice for I did not get my choice.

 At last I have nothing more to write to you.  You need not write to me until you get another letter from me so you will know where to write to.  So nothing more at present but I remain your loving husband until death.

Emeline Rink
Andrew Rink

I got (?presents) of shoes, of a haversack, knapsack.  I have got but one pair of drawers.  I have got only one coat.


November 1, 1963 (Sunday)

My dear companion

 I now embrace an opportunity of writing a few lines to inform you that I am well except cold.  I want you to write to me whether you have got the corn up or not and whether you have got the hogs up or not and if they are not up I want them put up soon.  I want you to write to me whether you are getting the stalk ground sowed or not.  Write whether you have got any person to get wood for you or not.

 I am in the company that my brothers was in but they are not here now.  Write whether you are still about or not.  I want you to (tell) me whether my nag is still able for service or not.  I do not know whether I shall ever see you any more or not but still hope to.

 We left Culpepper Thursday evening and went about three miles to the guard house.  We left there next day about 11 o’clock and went to our regiment.  Write to me whether you have got any letter from brother Daniel or not or whether you know anything about him or not.  I want you to send to brother Noah that he had better come back with being arrested.  There is a man to be shot here this morning for desertion but they are not apt to be punished if they come voluntary.

Direst your letter to Va. Brandy Station, Company I, care of Capt. Haynes, Kirkland’s Brigade.

 Nothing more only remain your husband until death

A. Rink to
Emeline Rink



Orange Courthouse, Va.
November 3, 1863 (Tuesday)

Dear wife & family

 I this morning take the present opportunity to drop you a few lines to let you know that I am well and hope when this comes to hand it may find you able and enjoying the rich blessings of God.

 We have been a marching about from one place to another.  We was a looking for a fight last Sunday.  We have crossed the Raphidon River and have taken up camp on this side of the river.  I have had everything stolen from me, all but what I had on.  My blanket and (?) was stolen from me.  If you have any chance (? At all) I want you to send me something in the way of clothing and a blanket or a (?quilt) or something.

 I have written to you two or three times since I left home and have never received any answer yet.  I want to know whether you have got your corn gathered yet or not and if you have got your wheat sowed yet or not and if you have got your fattening hogs up or not.  I want to know whether you have got anybody to chop your wood yet and to haul it up and how you are getting along, if you are all well.

 We are looking every day here for a battle.  I expect it will be soon.  I am tolerable well at this time except a bad cold.  I have seen a great deal since I came out here.  I could not tell you what all if I was to try.  They are some of the regt. In our brigade have orders now to cook rations for a march.  I don’t know where they are going and I expect we will have orders to go soon.

 My dear wife when you get this letter I want you to answer it as soon as you get I for I am so anxious to hear from you.  If you have written to me the letters must have been misplaced on the way or they would of got here.  When you write to me again direct your letters to Richmond, Virginia, in care of Capt. N. L. Haynes, Co. I, 11th Regt., Kirkland Brigade, Heth Division.

 I remain your husband until death and hoping you will remain the same.

Andrew Rinck to
Emeline Rinck
Catawba Co., NC



Orange Courthouse, Va.
November the 16, 1863 (Monday)
Emeline Rink

Dear wife

 It is with pleasure I seat myself to drop you a few lines to let you know that I am well and I truly hope these few lines may come safe to you and find you and the children well.  I can say to you that I received your kind letter the 13 dated the 9 and I was truly glad to hear from you and especially to hear that you all was well.  You wanted to know if there was anybody in the co. that I was acquainted.  There is none that I am particular acquainted.  I reckon there will be no chance for you to send anything by any in our co.

 Dear wife I can say to you that there is no chance for me to get home.  You must do the best you can for none of the soldiers can’t get home that has been out.  I hope the Lord will be with you.

 Dear wife I can say to you that I have been on one hard march last night.  A week we marched all night and I can tell you that I had my knapsack and everything I had stole on the march, blanket and all, and I have nothing but what I have on my back, and I can say to you that I have not drawed any money yet and I don’t know when I will draw.  I can say to you that we are camped near Orange Courthouse but we have orders to keep 2 days’ rations(?) ready for marching.  The news is that we will go to Weldon N. C. but I fear it is not so.

 Dear wife I must bring my few lines to a close by asking you to write as soon as you get this letter.  So nothing more but remain your loving husband till death.

Andrew Rink to
Emeline Rink


Orange Courthouse, Va.
November the 24, 1863 (Tuesday)

My dear and loving wife

 It is with pleasure I again seat my(self) to let you know that I am well and I truly hope these few lines will come safe to you and find you all blest with health,

 Dear wife I can inform you that I received your kind letter the 22 dated the 19.  I was truly glad to hear that you was getting along so well.

 Dear wife I have come to the conclusion that you had better not send the box you spoke of sending for if you do I don’t expect to get it and it will be lost so if you haven’t started it yet don’t send it.

 You wanted to know if my clothes was stole I started from home with.  I had one pair of pants, one pair of (?slips), one shirt, one cap taken.  I had drawed my woolen shirt and my socks.  I had forgot one cloth pair of shoes, and my blanket and my (?box) and other little things.  (2 words) to mention those was taken with (?things—difficult line to read).  You wanted to know how it happened my knapsack got stole.  The men I was with I left it with and went to see if I could get across the river and when I got back the men (difficult to read) my knapsack was gone too and that was about midnight and it was so dark I couldn’t see who stole it and this (is) all of that scrape.

 I have nothing more to write at this time that would interest you.  I must bring my few lines to a close by asking you to write as soon as you get this letter and give me all the news.  So nothing more but remain your loving husband until death.

Andrew Rinck
Emeline Rinck



Orange Courthouse, Va.
December the 5, 1863 (Saturday)

Dear and loving wife

 It is with greatest pleasure I seat myself this morning to drop you a few lines to let you know that I am well and I truly hope these few lines will come safe to you and find you all well.  I received your kind letter 26 dated the 22 and was truly glad to hear from you all.  About the tobacco you let some of it go for hauling for you must have firewood.

 Dear wife the same night I received your letter we had to leave and go fight the Yankees.  We was gone one week but we have got back to our old camp.  I haven’t heard anything from the box you sent me.  I haven’t went to see anything about it yet but I will try and go tomorrow and see about it but I expect it is gone too.

 Dear wife I have wrote a letter that I have got no answer to yet.  I think it was dated the 22.  I would like to know if you have got it or not.  I want to know if you have got any money so you can but salt.  I can’t help you any for I haven’t drawed any money yet.

 Dear wife I want you let me know if you are up and about yet and how you are getting along.  I want you to let me know if they have come after the (?rent) on the tenth or not.
 Dear wife you wanted to know how I like camp life.  I can tell you I don’t like it at all for it is a hard life to live.  I will tell you the price of tobacco it is worth from 1.50 to 2 dollars a plug and apples is worth from 2 to 4 dollars per dozen and so on.

 Write soon.  Nothing more but remains yours until death.

Andrew Rinck
To Emeline Rink



Orange Courthouse
December the 15, 1863 (Tuesday)

Dear and loving wife

 With pleasure I seat myself to let you know that I am well and I (?greatly) hope these few lines will come safe to you and find you and the children all well and doing the same.

 Dear wife I received your kind letter and was truly glad to hear from you.  I can say to you that I got my box yesterday.  I got to see Mr. Yount and Mr Saybock and William Heafner.  I was truly glad to see my old friends and glad to get my box but I had to go about seven miles for it but everything was (?good) and it only cost me 3 dollars.  They only got there with the boxes Thursday evening.

 I will send you a name for the baby.  I want you to call it after your sister Caty.  Catherine is the (?name) for the baby and I want you to write if that name will suit you or not.

 I wrote the first of this month and I want to know if you got (the) money.  I want you to write if you got the letter or not.  I have forgot the date of it but it was wrote the first of this month.

 Dear wife I can say to you times is hard here and don’t look like they was getting no better.  You—may be you didn’t get the letter I wrote.  You can sell some tobacco for hauling wood but I want you to send to me every chance you can for it is mighty good.  We have to pay from 2 to 2.50 per plug and not good at that.

 Dear wife I want you write if my turnip patch made any turnips or not.  I want to know if you have anybody to mend shoes or not when you need it.  When you get wood choppers pay them if you can for I can’t help you any for I haven’t received any money yet.

 So nothing more at this time but remain your loving husband until death.

Andrew Rinck
Emeline Rinch
 Write as soon as you get this.  I want you write if you know how father is getting along.


Orange Courthouse
December 1863

Dear wife

 I this morning take the present opportunity (to) drop you a few lines to let you know that I am well and truly the hope these few lines may find you all well.

 You must take it as easy as you can about your little baby for it is a heap better off than we are.  It is as near and dear to me as it is to you but I never saw it.  So you must not trouble yourself.  You wrote that I was taken prisoner or that you heard so, but you must not believe everything that you hear these times.  I am not a prisoner and I hope that I never will be taken a prisoner.  You wanted me to write and tell you if I have ever heard from my brother Daniel.  I can tell you that I have not heard from him.

 Dear wife you said that you wanted me to write all the good news.  Well I have not heard any good news for it is mighty hard times now for we don't get enough to eat and hardly enough to wear.  I can tell you what we get to eat-we get beef and flour and sometimes a little bacon.  Sometimes we draw about a dozen Irish potatoes to a man but that is not very often.  We all draw a spoon full of molasses to a man here.

The other news I can tell you that I drawed me a knapsack yesterday evening.  I can tell you who all tents with me-myself, Summerson(*Peter Summerow), and Mister Wiant (*David Wyont), Mister Hallman (*Hallman, Abel, Andrew, or Michael).  I want you to let me know whether John Williams ever returned to you a (?bottle) and a lock and a (?will) from Camp Vance.

 Dear wife I would like to see you all.  I wish that I could be at home with you to help you work to maintain our family.  I hope the war will soon end so that we can all get to come home.  Once more I can tell you that I am pretty near out of shoes for I haven't drawed any shoes since I came to the company.

 I want you if you have not already had the funeral preached for the baby.  I want you to have it preached the first chance you get to.  I have not much more to write that will interest you much; therefore, I will bring my letter to a close by saying to you to write some.  Therefore, I will bring my letter to a close.  I remain your husband until death.

 You must try and get along as well as you can till you can be able to get about again.  So I want you to write as soon as this comes to hand.

Andrew Rink to his wife
Emeline Rink


Camp near Orange Courthouse, Va.
January the 4, 1864
(Monday)
Dear wife

 I seat myself to let you know that I am tolerable well; only my feet and legs is swollen so I can't hardly get along.  I hope these few lines will come safe to hand and find you all well and doing well.

 I received your kind and welcome letter New Year's Day which was dated Dec. the 25, and I was glad to hear that you was all well and doing well.  You said in your letter that you was about to make a trade for a colt if I was willing.  You do as you please about it.  If you think you can make a good trade, go ahead and do the best you can.  I will say to you if you buy the colt you must sell the old mare if you can; and if you can't, you'll have to keep it.

 Dear wife, I would like to see you all again if I could but see no chance, anyways shortly.  Frances Elnora. (?Chumey ?Chamimey ?Sylva) and Rebecka, James Esquire.  Dear wife, I want you to send me a little bunch of each one of the children's hair.  Put each one's hair in a bunch to itself.

 Dear wife, I want you to put all the ground out in corn that you have got that you didn't sow in wheat, and I want you to plant a good patch of molasses cane.  Dear wife, I want you to let me know whether your hogs is fat yet or not and how your corn holds out.  You must take good care of the hogs and pigs.  Dear wife, I will say to you that if you get that colt you must get some slabs hauled and weatherboard a stable.  Maybe you can get Fry to do the work for you.

 Dear wife, I can tell you that we have moved 3 miles east of Orange and put up winter quarters, and we are in them now.  I would a wrote to you sooner, but we had everything tore up and building our houses that I did not have the chance to write any sooner.

 Dear wife, I have a hack of plank at the sawmill yet.  I want you to get Jeffry Turner to haul them sometime and you must be sure and hack them up again.  You can put them to use.  I want you to get Fry to fix your porch for you if you can get him, and I will send you money to pay for it.  I will get my bounty money shortly and two months' wages.  If you get the porch fixed, you must get flat rocks to put under the blocks and have the blocks hewn on two sides and weatherboard from the ground up.

 Write soon.  I remain your affectionate husband till death.

Andrew Rinck [to]
Rebecka Rink


Orange Courthouse, Va.
January 11th, 1864
(Monday)

My dear wife

 I take the present opportunity of writing you a few lines in answer to your kind letter which came to hand a few days ago.  This will leave me in tolerable good health.  You wanted me to write to you oftener.  I would, but I can't get a letter written every time I want to.

 Dear wife, I want you, when you write again, to fix a hank of sewing thread and send it to me in the letter.  It need not be a large one.  I have a little (bit) of sewing to do.  If you have a chance to send me my shoes, send them to me; and if you send them, grease them good before you send them; and if you have a chance to send the shoes, send me some eatables with them for we are very scarce of things to eat here.

 And, dear wife, you must get along the best you can and send the children all you can to school if you have shoes for them.  If not, don't send them without they have shoes.  You spoke in your last letter about buying a colt.  You can use your own pleasure about buying it.  If you get it, you will have to get your stable fixed up so you can keep it in it.  I want to know if you have killed any of your fattening hogs.  If you have corn enough, you better not killed them yet; but if you think your corn will not hold out, you have better killed them.  Write and let me know.

 Dear wife, I have no news of importance to write.  Everything is dull here and cold.  We have had snow here about 6 inches deep.  I have not been well for sometime.  I am worse off now than I have been.  I will have to come to a close as I have nothing more to write.  We don't hear much or see much to write about.  You will have to excuse me for not writing any more at this time.  If you get G. W. Turner to haul your wood for you, get him to come by the sawmill and haul the plank for you, what they is left of them. I want you to send me a lock of your hair and all of the children by the first opportunity.  Write to me soon and let me know if you have received the letter I sent you sometime ago.  You never said in your letter.  I expect we will draw money soon.  If we do, I will send you some by the first opportunity.  I can still get a little money now and then to buy my paper and envelopes.  I wrote to you in my last letter that you might get Henry Fry to fix up your porch; and if you can get nails at any price, to get them; and if I get any money, I will try and send it to you so you can pay him.

 Well, I must close as I have nothing more to write at present.  Write soon.  I remain your ever loving husband until death.

Daniel Rinck (for Andrew)
To Emeline Rinck
Catawba


Camp near Orange Courthouse, Va.
January 28, 1864
(Thursday)

Dear wife

 It is with great pleasure that I now take the present opportunity of dropping you a few lines to let you know that I am well at this time and hope that those few lines will find you enjoying the same blessing.  I received your letter which come to hand last evening which give me much pleasure to hear that you was well at that time.

 Dear wife, I suspect that you will have to give him your meat.  I suspect that you did right in not buying that colt, being that fodder is scarce; but if you could sell the old mare and buy the colt, it might be better because the mare is getting old.  You need pretend to sent them shoes; you can wear them yourself as I suspect that you will need them before I will for I have got my shoes fit now, and they will last me a good while yet.  You talk about sending me a little box, but I suspect that will be a dull chance too; but if Lieutenant Alias is at his father's, you may send me a little to date with him if he will fetch it as he belong to the regiment.

 As I drawed 50 dollars in money I will send you some as soon as I get the chance to send any as brother Noah is here and I suspect that they will try and get him a discharge.  If he does get a discharge, I will send it by him.

 I would like to know who wrote that last letter that you wrote to.  It was mighty hard to read as there was some words that was not filled out right.  When you write again, you will please try and get it wrote as plain as you can.

 They are talking that we will have to go on picket about next Monday or Tuesday, but I don't know whether we will or not as the weather is very pretty at this time as there is no war news at all of any account.  If brother Noah does get a discharge, I will write to you as possible about I will make him promise to take you some money.

 I can inform you that I received the sewing thread and needle that you sent to, but I didn't need the needle.  If you can, send me a little fine thread and little needle to sew on shirt buttons.  If you get a chance to, send me anything to eat with anybody.  You may send me some patches to patch my clothes.

 As I have no news of much importance to write, I will come to a close for this time.  Write soon. I remain your ever loving husband till death.

From Andrew Rinck
Emeline Rinck


Camp near Orange Courthouse, Va.
February 8, 1864
(Monday)

Dear wife

 I take my pen in hand to drop you a few lines.  I received your kind letter the 5 of this month, and I was glad to hear that you were all well.  These few lines leave me well except one of my legs is very sore, and I suppose I will go to the hospital tomorrow till my leg gets better.

 Dear wife, I can inform you that they was a little fight here yesterday, but our regiment was not engaged.  They was not many men killed.  The weather is very cold here.  Our rations is very light.

 Dear wife, you need not write to me till I write to you for I will have to go to the hospital, I suppose, tomorrow.

 Dear wife, I got that poke of provision that you sent to me by Mr. Hudspeth and I was very glad of it.  I must bring my remarks to a close as I have given you all the news.

 Your loving husband until death.

Andrew Rinck to his
Dear wife Emeline Rinck




General Hospital
February 18, 1864
Gordonsville, Va.
(Thursday)

Dear wife

 I take this opportunity to write you a few lines to let you know where I am at.  I am in the hospital at this place in which I have been here three or four days now.  I am a little better in my legs now than when I first came in the hospital.  That box of provisions you wrote to me about I don't expect to get it myself, but I have left word at the company to take care of it for me. When you write me again you must let me know what you had in it.

 I will try to get a furlough before long and come home if I can, but you need not expect me before you see me come.  Times are very hard here and things are very dear.  We have to pay four dollars for one meal and one dollar for a chicken leg.  It will make but one mouthful.  I intend to send you five dollars in this letter, and you can take four of them and pay your sister that I borrowed from her.  I drawed fifty dollars and spent twenty of it and don't know what I got for it.

 I have no more at present.  I remain your dear husband.

Andrew Rinck
PS Direct your letter to me at Gordonsville Hospital in care of Dr. B. M. (?Sebby), Ward K.  Write me as soon as you can.

A. Rinck



Receiving Hospital
February the 27th, 1864
Gordonsville, Va.
(Saturday)

Dear wife

 It is with great pleasure that I take my seat to drop you a few lines in answer to your very kind letter which came to hand today dated the 24th.  I was very glad to hear that you were all well and in good health and hope these few lines may find you all enjoying the same good health.

 Dear wife, my health is a good deal better than it was when I last wrote to you.  My ankles are still swelled some yet.  That is all that is the matter with me at this time.

 Dear wife, you wished to know whether I knew where Noah Rinck was.  I saw him about two days before I left the regiment.  He was sent to the hospital, but I don't know where.

 Dear wife, I drew $50 dollars since I left home and have spent $25 of it for something to eat since our rations are very light here at the hospital.  Flour is $225 dollars per barrel.  Bacon $5.00 per pound.  Onions $2.00 per doz.  Apples $2 to $4 per dozen.  Eggs $4 dozen.  Brandy from $20 to $25 dollars per quart.

 Dear wife, let me know whether you received that $5 dollars that I sent to you in my last letter or not.  I send $5 more in this.  Let me know about it too.  Write soon and direct your letter here.

Your husband till death
Andrew Rinck


Hickory Tavern (?4777)

General Hospital
March 12, 1864
Gordonsville, Va.
(Saturday)

Dear wife

 I received your most kind letter of the 6th and was glad to hear from you and the children.  I am feeling much better than I have been for some time.  You stated that Noah was in the hospital in Richmond.  I will try to get transferred to Richmond to Noah so I can see him.

 Dear wife, you must write to me as soon as you can get a chance for I like to hear from you every chance that I can get.  You must not make yourself uneasy about me for I am getting along very well at this time.  I will send you some money as soon as the new issue comes in for it and will try to send you the ten dollars at this time.  Things are very dear here.  You can
To get anything for your money, but we must hope for the best for God will provide for us all.  I would like to come home very much, but we have got to do our duty and stand up to the Yankees until we drive them from our soil, but I hope the time will come when we all meet again.  Give my best love to all the children.  I have nothing more at present.
I remain your dear husband
Andrew Rinck

You need not look for me home until next fall if I get home then, but you must try and get along the best you can.


Camp Jackson 1st division
March 20, 1864
Ward K, Richmond, Va.
(Sunday)

My dear wife

 I take this opportunity of writing you a few lines to inform you that I am (?repaired) about back (3 unreadable words).  I hope these few lines may find you enjoying the best of health.  I have not much to write more than times is very hard.  I am here with my Brother Noah.  We are together.  He is very poorly yet, but I hope not dangerously.  I want to know how you are getting along with your farm, if you have nay hard money by you.  Don't let it go if you can help it.

 You need not to be uneasy about me for I was not very sick.  I only got so that I could not march good.  I want you to write to me if you have had anything done to the porch or not.  You must try to get Brother Ephraim to do your blacksmith work and will pay him as soon as you can.  I want to know if you have paid the tenth of your meat or not.  I want to know if you have heard from Brother Daniel or not.
I remain yours
Andrew Rinck


Camp near Orange Courthouse, Va.
March 31, 1864
(Thursday)

Dear Wife

 I with pleasure take my pen in hand to drop you a few lines.  I have no news of importance to write at this time though.

 I will give you all the news.  I can inform you that I just got back to my regiment.  My health is very good at this time, though my leg is not all well yet, and I hope when these few lines comes to hand that they may find you all well.  I have wrote two letters home since I got one from you.  Please tell Brother Daniel to write to me soon and let me know whether he got home safe or not and how he is getting along.

 I will say to you that I left the hospital day before yesterday, and Brother Noah was still at the hospital when I left, but he had his discharge.  He was going to start home yesterday.

 I will say to you that my regiment never got that box of provisions that you sent (unreadable words) that the box was sent back to Gordonsville, but I never got it.

 Dear wife, I don't want you to send me anything more to eat no more unless you can send it by some men that belong to this regiment.  When Brother Daniel has to come back, I would be glad for you to send me ham or meat by him if you can (?) at (?) send it.

 Well, I must bring my letter to a close.

Your loving husband till death
Andrew Rink

Direct your letters to Co. I, 11 NC troops
Kirkland's Brigade
Heth's Division
Richmond, Va.


Camp near Orange Courthouse
April the 5, 1864
(Tuesday)

Dear wife

 I this morning take the present opportunity to drop you a few lines to let you know that I am well and truly hope these few lines may find you all well.

 Dear wife, I received your letter the other day and was glad to hear from you to hear that you was well.  I want you to write and tell me whether Brother Daniel got home safe or not.  We had a very deep snow here some time ago, and we have had several little snows since then, and we have a rainy time of it now.  We have had very bad weather ever since I came back from the hospital to the company.  I am glad to hear that you was a getting along with your work as well as you are.  Whenever you get a chance to have the baby's funeral preached, you might better have it soon, for chance of me a getting a furlough now is very dull.  I want you to let me know whether you got the plank hauled up from the sawmills yet or not.  Brother Noah said that he thought he could work some at the porch for you if he gets home.  I want you to let me know whether you heard that he got home safe yet or not.

 That box you started to send me, everything that was in it got lost.  The regiment that I was in got the box or a part of it, and they eat it up and now denies it that they ever got it.  The people are not to be trusted these days for I had a shirt stole out of my knapsack.  It was the one that you sent with your Uncle (?Kenery).

 I want Daniel as soon as he can to write to me and tell me how all the folks is getting along.  I want you to tell Daniel that he should go and see Brother Ephraim and tell him that I would like for him to do my blacksmithing this summer for me.  And tell him to write to me and tell me how he will charge for his work, whether he will charge high or not.

 I want you in your next letter to write and tell me whether you will have enough meat to do you or not.  I would like to be there at home to get some of your sweet potatoes, and I want you to write and tell me whether you have money or not.  I want you to tell me whether you got enough (?) for to do you.

 Dear wife, I have not much news to write that will interest you much, so I will bring my letter to a close by asking you to write to me as soon as you get this letter, so I will close by asking you to write soon.  So, no more, only remain your husband until death.

Andrew Rink
To Emeline Rink


Camp near Orange Courthouse, Va.
April the 19th, 1864
(Tuesday)

Dear Wife

 I with great pleasure take my pen in hand to answer your kind letter which came to hand the 12th of this month.  I was truly glad to hear that you were all well.  I am happy to inform you that my health is very good at this recent time and pray will find you very well.  Just try to thank God (?for the blessings ____?) may find you all enjoying the blessings of good health.  I can inform you that everything is quiet along the lines this morning.  I hope that everything will still remain quiet.

 Dear wife, you wrote to me to know whether I need any clothing or not.  I will say to you that I don't need any clothing at the present time.  I can inform you that I sent my coat to Lincolnton in a box, and I wrote to my brothers and told them to get my coat and send it home if they could.

 Oh dear wife, I hope and trust to God that we will see each other again on earth; though if we never do, I hope that we may meet in heaven.

 Please write soon.  Direct your letter to Co. I, 11 NC troops, Kirkland's Brigade, Orange Courthouse.


Camp near Orange Courthouse, Va.
April the 24th, 1864
(Sunday)
Dear wife

 I again seat myself to drop you a few lines.  I am thankful to inform you that my health is very good at present time, only my legs is not well yet.  They pain me very bad (?), and I trust to the Lord that these few lines may find you all in the best of health.

 Dear wife, I wrote a letter to you since I got one from you though I will write again.

 Dear wife, when Brother Daniel starts back to this company, I want you to send me a pair of cotton socks and make the legs a thin layer.  My legs is ailing today.  Be sure to send them (?),

 Dear wife, the news is that war will commence tomorrow, though I hope not.  Dear wife, I want you to take good care of the children, and make them (?accept) it.  I want you to raise them right if you please as I am far away.  Dear wife, I hope that if we never meet on earth that we may meet in heaven.  Dear wife, please send me word whether Brother Daniel got a book for each one of the children or not.

Dear wife, I want you to write to me often as it gives me so much pleasure to get a letter from you.  Write soon.  Direct your letter to Co. I, 11 NC troops, Kirkland's Brigade, Heth Division, Orange Court House, Va.

Andrew Rinck to
Emeline Rinck


Petersburg
June the 13, 1864
(Monday)

My dear wife

 I seat myself this evening to drop you a few lines to let you know that I am still in the land of the living, hoping when these few lines come to hand they may find you all well.  The weather is very dry and everything is burning up for the want of rain.  Daniel and myself are still well and together.  I want you to write whether you got your small grain sewed or not.  I want to know how corn looks there in the neighborhood.

 I had no chance to send my letters for the mail has been stopped.  I think the mail go in a few days again.  Tomorrow will be a month since I got a letter from you.  I would be glad to hear from you at any time.

 Some little fighting on our left shelling the town.  Some skirmishing, too.  Everything we buy is very high and takes as huge lump of money as we get bread.

 I must come to close.  Write soon as you get this letter.  I'm glad to hear from you at any time.

      From Andrew Rinck to Emeline Rink
Give my love to the children.  Write soon.


Near Petersburg, Va.
July 15th, 1864
(Friday)

Dear wife

 I take the pleasure of writing you a few lines to let you know that I am well at this time, and I hope that these few lines may find you in the same state of health.

 And I can inform you that there is everything quiet on the lines at this time except some shelling and some pickets a firing, and the news is here that Grant is a drawing his force away from here.  There is some of them gone now, and I hope that they will all go and let us alone for we have hard times here.  It is that dry and dusty.  It has not rained in two months and there is every(thing) very near burnt dry.  And I can inform you that there is some (?) of our corp a going to Pennsylvania, but I don't know.  If they take one whole corp, we will have to go.  Some of our troops go, sometime one corp and one division, and if the news is true that we get from them, they are a doing a heap of damage there.

 And I can inform you that we have to pay very high for what things we buy to eat, and they are very hard to get, and I want you write to me if you got your small grain sewed or not and how the season is there.

 And I must close for this time, but I wish to see you all, and I hope that I will see you all again.  And I must close by asking you to write soon and direct your letters to Richmond, Kirkland's Brigade, Heth's Division, 11 Regiment, NC Regiment.


Petersburg
July 26th, 1864
(Tuesday)

My dear and beloved companion

 I embrace the present opporturnity of sending you a few lines to let you know that I am well at this time.  I hope this may find you and family enjoying the same blessing.

 It has been a long time since I have got any letter from you.  I would be very glad to hear from you.  I have often thought of you, but there has been but little chance to write here.  We have been moving about so much.  We have been at this place near two weeks, the longest that we have been at any one place since the fight commenced.  I hope the Lord will spare my life to see the end of this war so that I may go home to see you again; but when that time will come, we cannot tell.  I would be glad to be there now to eat some of your beans and irish potatoes and see you and the children eating with me.

 Canoning and picket fighting is still going on about Petersburg, but we have not been engaged for some time.  I have seen many dead Yankees, some of them burnt where the woods was burnt.  Many of them never will be buried.  When we charged the Yankee breastworks, they set the woods on fire before they left.  Many of their wounded was burnt to death.  Bullets and shells have passed close to me, but I have not been hit with any of them yet.  A piece of a shell struck a frying pan that I had on my back.

 Write soon and let me know how you are getting along and how crops are.  Whether you will make enough to do you or not.  Write how wheat is, whether it has good grain or not.

 It was in grief I left you, but I hope we will have the pleasure of meeting to part no more until death shall part us.

 Send a little red pepper in a letter.  Nothing more at present, only remain your affectionate husband until death.

Andrew Rink

Write how Daniel Whisner is getting along.  Brother Daniel is well and how father is getting along and how Washington Turner is getting along, and while we are parted and scattered abroad, let us pray for each other and trust in the Lord.


Petersburg, Va.
August the 1st
(Monday)

Dear wife

 I take the present opportunity of writing you a few lines to let you know that I am well, hoping these few lines will come safe to hand and fine you all well and doing well.  Dear wife, I read your kind letter and the thing you sent by Captain Elias, and I was truly glad to get them.  I got-4 cakes and tobacco.

 Daniel is well.  I can tell you that we are seeing hard times now.  The weather is so dry and hot.  I can say to you that we have been on a hard march.  We just got back here yesterday morning, and I am weried out.  I was on picket last night and have just got back.

 I can tell you that they had a hard fight here at Petersburg while we was gone.  The fight took place last Friday.  The Yankees dug under our breastworks and blow them up about a hundred yards and then charged them with their Negroes.  Our folks kill and took a good many Negroes prisoners and a heap of white Yankees, but I don't know the number.

 You said you had your hay cut and stacked and oats stacked.  I was glad to hear it.  I want you to write to me and let me know whether you made a good crop of oats and where you rented a meadow.  I will try and send some tobacco with Elias that I drawed if he will bring it.  I haven't asked him yet.  I haven't any particular news to write at this time.  I have read 2 letters from you since I have wrote.  I would like to know whether you have any tobacco growing this year or not.  I want to know how cabbage looks this year.

 I must come to a close by asking you to write soon and give me all the news that is going and tell me how your crop looks.  I remain your loving and affectionate husband until death.

Andrew Rinck
Emeline Rinck


Petersburg, Va.
August 1864

Dear wife

 I seat myself this morning to inform you that I am well at this time, and I hope when these few lines comes to your kind heart they may find you in the same state of health.

 And I can inform you that I got the things that you sent to me and I will send you some things.  I will send five plugs of tobacco and a small poke of coffee and a cap for my little boy and two books for the two oldest girls and these (??) to you; and if you don't want to use it, you may sell it at a dollar and a half a pluck or two dollars a pluck, and I will send five dollars in money.  I can't spare any more at this time.  There is everything so dear here that I can't send you any more.  I just got twenty-two dollars.

 And I want you to write me.  Let me know how you are a getting along and how the times is.  Here the times is hard here, and there is no hopes of better times yet.  And I want (you) to send me some coarse sewing thread, if you can, in a letter; and if you see a chance to, send me taters and some things.  To send them so that I will get them and some onions if you have got them (?).  It is not (?worthwhile) to send any this time of year for it will spoil.

 And I want you to write to me if you got your wheat thrashed.  I want to know how much you made.  So write and give me all the news that you can.  So write soon and don't delay.  So nothing more at present, only remain your husband.

Andrew Rinck
Emeline Rinck


Petersburg
September 5th, 1864
(Monday)

My dear and beloved companion

 I shall embrace this opportunity of writing to inform you that I am at the hospital.  I am not very well, but I hope that I will get better soon.  I hope this will find you and family well.

 I received a letter from you not long ago but have had no chance to write until now.  I lost all my paper and envelopes by a cannon ball.  It cut off my cartridge box, tore my knapsack all to pieces from off my back, tore my coat on the elbow and on my side.  I was not hurt, only bruised a little on my side.  Everything in my knapsack was lost.  David Glen was kind enough to give me paper and envelope to write this letter.  I had no money to buy anything.

 This was done in the last charge we made last Thursday.  Was a week ago on Sunday before we charged the Yankees from their breastworks.  We lost two killed and several wounded.  We lay in their breastworks from morning until after dark in water about knee deep.  We retreated back that night about one mile and was put on picket that night.  The next day the Yankees charged our picket line and drove us back.  We formed a line in the woods and kept firing on them until dark.  I stood behind a tree and shot until I was about out of ammunition.  I then started back when a ball tore my pants about my ankle but did not touch my skin.  I feel thankful to God that he has kept me through so many dangers.  I don't like to charge the Yankees, but they had taken the railroad between Petersburg and Weldon, and they had to be driven from it between the two places that we charged them.  They have a fort built that we cannot charge them out of.

 I have nothing more particular about the fight.  My legs are swelled and I have a boil on my knee that I can scarcely walk.  My hands are also swelled and tender.  My appetite is tolerable good.  I would be glad to be at home and help you eat something better than bread and meat, I think I would soon get well.  I still hope through the blessing of God to get home some time to stay.

 I want you to send me a little paper and some envelopes.  You can send them in your letters.  Write to me how the children are getting along.  I would like to know whether my little boy grows much or not and if he thinks much of his cap that I sent him and if my girls think much of their books that I sent them and whether they are learning much or not.  I want them to learn all they can.  They will find learning worth more to them than thousands of gold and silver as far as that is concerned.

 Myself and brother Daniel are at the hospital together.  Daniel had been at the hospital and was sent back.  We went to the hospital together yesterday morning.  Daniel is very poorly with the diarrea.

 You wrote to me that Daniel Whisenhunt wanted me to write to him but there is no chance of me doing that now as I have lost all my paper and envelopes.  I want you to let him read this letter as soon as you have the chance.  I want him to send a letter to me.

 Nothing more, only remain your affectionate husband until death.

     Andrew Rink to Emeline Rink

Write soon. Letter to Mrs. Emeline


Winder Hospital Richmond, Va.   
October 3, 1864 (Monday)
6, Livis 85, Ward Va.

Dear beloved wife and children

 With pleasure I seat myself this evening to drop you a short note to let you know where I am.  I am in the hospital with a burned hand.  I burned my hand last Tuesday with some damage cartridges.  It is doing well at this time, but I am sorrowed to tell you that my health is not good.  I have the rheumetism in my legs and back.

 I received your kind letter the 15 of last month, and I was very glad to hear that you are well, and I hope when this comes to your kind hand it will find you and all the children well and getting along as good as you can in these times.

 I can say to you that they are fighting a great deal here at this time.  There has been fighting on the north side of the James River as well as on the south side.  They commenced to fight last Thursday and are fighting yet, as well as I can learn, but by the kind will of God, we was successful and held our works.  I have not heard from Brother Daniel yet, so I can’t tell if he was in the fight or not.

 I want you write to me and let me know how you are getting along with the farming works at home.  If you can’t get along, I want you to hire a hand until you get the small grain sowed.  I want you to send me a pair of woolen socks if you get the chance.  (In margin: “Make them long in the legs.”)

 I must close, hoping to hear from you soon.  Write soon.

      From your true husband


On the line near Petersburg, Va.
November 11th, 1864 (Friday)

Dear wife

 I now take the present opportunity to let you know I am well, hoping these lines may reach your hand in due time and find you well.

 I received your letter last Saturday of the 29th Oct.  I was glad to hear from you all.  I received the box you sent to me on the 8th and for which I return my sincere thanks.  I tell you it came in a mighty good time.  Everything was received in good order.

 I have not wrote to you in some time, but you must excuse me.  We have so much duty to do that is only now and then I have a chance to write.

 I have not heard from Brother Daniel since he left the company.  I was at the hospital at Richmond when he left the company.   If you have heard where he is, please let me know and I will write to him.

 We had to charge the Yankees the 3rd day after I got back from the hospital.  (Line difficult to read) and through the mercy of God I came out unhurt, but our brigade suffered very much.  We lost one-third or more of our brigade, but, fortunately, they were most all taken prisoners.

 You stated in your letter that you could not tell me who you sent that box by.  I will tell you; it was Mr. Rubin Hoyel (Hoyle).

 If I live I expect to get a furlough now shortly and come home and see you all again one time more.  I can’t tell you when it will be.  You need not look for me until you see me.

 Tell Celila I received that letter she sent to Daniel.  I have the letter yet.  I don’t know where Daniel is, and I will keep it until I hear where he is.  I want you to let me know what you have done with them two sows.  Have you got them both fattened or only one.  Let me know when you write again whether you are done sowing wheat or not.

 Well, I must come to a close as I have given you all the news that will interest you.  I don’t think we will fight  here soon again.  I remain your true husband until death.

Andrew Rink


Near Petersburg, Va.
November the 30, 1864 (Wednesday)

My dear wife

 I received your kind letter the 27.  I was so glad to hear that those few lines found you all well.  These few lines leaves me well and hope they may find you enjoying the same blessing.  I was so glad to hear that brother Daniel had come safe home once again but sorry to hear that his wife had missed him for she may have a great deal of trouble to find out that he is at home.  I hope she has returned home safe once again.

 My dear wife, you need not look for me home for some time for there is only one to the (?).  You need not look for me till you see me a coming.

 You wanted to know if I want any clothes or not.  I drawed clothes and shoes at the hospital and I drawed a blanket with the company.  I think this will do me for some time.  You must let me know if you got any shoe leather for children’s shoes or not.  If you please, I wish you would send me one (?) needle if you please and have got it to spare in your next letter.  I wish you would send me a box by Mr. Hoil (Hoyle).  He is coming out here about Christmas.  You must send me about a peck of flour and a peck of turnips and sweet taters and one peck of onions and some (?brilar) if you have it to spare and some molasses and some meat and bread, too, if you have it to spare, too.  I wish you would send me one half pound of salt in the box, too, if you will.  You may send me some (?agis), too.  You can put it in the flour so that they may not break.  If you can, send me some vinegar so that it may not (?rot).  You should try and find out when Mr. Hoil (Hoyle) starts so you can send these things.  I can tell you in my next letter when I can get home shortly or not.

 I am now on picket and we can talk to the Yankee pickets.  We are now in winter quarters.  If we will stay in them long or not, it is hard to tell.  You must write soon to me and give me all the news.  You must let me know how brother Daniel is at this time when you write to me the next time.

 May the good Lord spare us to meet any more on this earth again.

A. Rink


Camp near Petersburg, Va.
December the 17, 1864 (Saturday)
Dear wife

 It is with much pleasure that I am permitted to seat myself this morning to write you a few lines to let you know how I am a getting along.  I am not very well at this time.  I have got the diarrhea and touch of colic, but not bad.

 I will inform you that we have had a hard march since I wrote home last, but we had no fighting to do.  I am not over the march yet.  I am sore and stiff from it yet.  We marched towards Weldon.  We went some 40 miles.  We got to the place where the Yankees burnt a depot on the Weldon road.  There was a power of salt and provision burnt up there.  I can inform you that there is no news here at this time.  Everything is very still here at this time, and we all hope it will stay so.

 You wrote to me that you would send me a box.  If you had the nails to make it you can gather up some old pieces of horse shoes and take them to my brother and get him to make you some mails.  I want you to write and let me know how Brother Daniel is a getting along.  I want to know whether my father and family is all well yet or not.  I want you to go and see father to see whether he made my little keg yet or not.  If he has, you can send me some molasses in it.  It won’t break like a jug.

 I will close for this time.  Excuse my short letter.  Write as soon as this comes to hand and give me all the news you can.  I remain your true husband as ever until death.

Andrew Rink


Camp near Petersburg, Va.
January the 27, 1865 (Friday)

Dear wife

 I take my pen in hand to let you know that I have landed to my company safe and sound again.  I was three days and three nights on the road.  The road was crowded a great deal, and we suffered a great deal with cold on the way.  And I can inform you that I found my box all right when I got here, except the sweet potatoes they was all rotten.  But a couple of the other things saved very well.

 I can inform you that I found the regiment at the same place I left it.  They hadn’t moved any since I left, and I found the company well as common.  I will say to you that there is no news here about any fighting now for the weather is too cold to fight any now, I think.

 I am glad to tell you that there is a right smart talk about peace here now, and I hope it will be soon.  The soldiers don’t think that we will have to fight through any other summer.  We all have good hopes of it, and I hope we will get our wish.

 We think our head men is doing something for us towards peace now.  We have got some of our leading men gone north now to do something towards peace we think, and there is a man in Richmond from the north now.  We hope he is after making peace with us soon.

 I will come to a close.  Write Soon.  I remain your true husband as ever until death.

      Andrew Rink


Camp near Petersburg, Va.
February the 10, 1865 (Friday)

Dear wife

 I seat myself to drop you a few lines to let you know that I am well except bad cold, and I hope this may find you and the children well.  I can inform you that I wrote a letter home the same day I got here, and I have not received any answer yet.  I don’t know whether my letter went through or not.

 I will inform you that I draw money last week.  I drew 99 dollars.  I see no chance to send any money home by hand, and I won’t send any until I get a letter from home first, and I want you to write me and let me know how you are getting along.

 We have very cold weather here now.  I can inform you that we had a little fight here last Sunday, but we only lost one man in our company.  There was fighting here on Monday and Tuesday, but our regiment didn’t get into it after Sunday.  I am glad to tell you that everything is still here again.  There is no talk of any fighting now.

 Dear wife, if you haven’t given your meat yet, you better give it in without any difficulty.  You might get in some difficulty about maybe, and you better let it go.  If you can’t make out with what you have, you had better put up a (?sow) or two and fatten them so you will have meat enough to do you.

 I can inform you that there is no prospect of the war ending soon as I can see.  But we must live in hopes until it comes.  I can tell you that I am most through with the provision that I got from home.  The rations is short that we get here.

 I will come to a close by saying write soon and fail not.  I remain your true husband as ever until death.

      Andrew Rink


Camp near Petersburg, Va.
February the 19, 1865 (Sunday)

Dear wife

 I take my pen in hand to write you a few lines to let you know that I am well and hoping when this comes to hand it will find you and the children all well.  I received a letter from you a few days ago but hadn’t the chance to answer it until now.  I will inform you that I will send you some money in a few days now.

 I am sorry to say that I haven’t any news to write of any importance at this time.  I want you to write to me to let me know how Brother Daniel is a getting along, whether he is any better or not.  I will inform you that Lieutenant Elias is at home and if he will bring it, please try and send me sonething to eat by him.  I can tell you that my box is most out and the rations we draw is very short.  I wrote to you about your meat.  I wanted to know if you have done anything about it yet or not.

 I will send you one dollar’s worth of stamps in my letter.  I want you to let me know whether you get them or not.

 I will come to a close by saying write soon.  I remain your true husband as ever until death calls me away.

      Andrew Rinck


Camp near Petersburg, Va.
March the 4, 1865 (Saturday)

Dear wife

 I this morning take the present opportunity to drop you a few lines to inform you that I am well and truly hope these few lines may find you all well and doing well.

 If you have not started me a box yet, you need not send me no box this time of the year.  We are under marching orders now, but we don’t know where we will go if we do move, for if you was to send me a box now, we might have to go off and leave it for we have marching orders every day or two now.  If you have a chance to send me a poke of provisions, you can do so, for if we do have to move, so I can carry it along with me.  I want you to write in your next letter whether you got the stamps that I sent to you in the other letter that I wrote to you.

 Our men here are still deserting and going to the Yankees still as they have been for some time past.  I think it will break the army.  There is about 2 or 3 hundred deserts very night.

 I will send fifty dollars the first chance I get.  Write soon and give me news.  So nothing more at present but remain your loving husband till death.

      Andrew Rinck


Camp near Petersburg, Va.
March 16th, 1865 (Thursday)

Dear wife and loving children

 I am once more permitted to drop you a few lines to let you know that I am well, hoping these few lines will speed their way and find you all well; I have no news worth your attention.  All are quiet along the line.  We are in our winter quarters yet but don’t know how long we will stay here.

 There is a heap of troops moving to our right in order I suppose to meet Grant if he should make a move to get the south side railroad.  We are expecting a hard fight on our right shortly; I hope it may not be, but I fear.

 Yours of 10th came to hand today.  It gives me great pleasure to hear that you all was well; you need not send me a box as it will be uncertain whether I could get it or not.  You can send me a poke of something to eat as our rations are very small and bids fare far smaller.

 There are a heap of men deserting, some goes to the Yankees and some home, but the majority goes are going to the Yankees.  There was eleven, most out of our regiment, last night; and it is a regular thing every night, more or less, and other brigades are as bad as ours and some a heap more.

 I have not sent you any money yet but will send fifty dollars in this letter.  I hope it will get through right.  I want you to spend it to the best advantage, and you must buy a knife for James.  You can get him one as cheap as you can, say five or ten dollars.

 Bacon is worth $11 per lb., flour $5 per pound, cornmeal $3 and $4 per lb., peas $4 per quart, other things in proportion.  As regards you giving in you meat, do as you think best.  You know whether you have it to spare or not.

 I am tired of this war, but I want to get out of it honorable if I didn’t get in honorable.  I will stay as long as the majority stays, but when the majority leaves, I shall leave, too.  Virginia is going to put the Negroes in the field immediately.

 Write soon and give me all the news.  So nothing more at present but remains your loving husband till death.

     Andrew Rink

Let me know if you get this money.

[This was the last letter received by Emaline.
Andrew died a month later.]



Andrew Rinck, Private, Company I, 11th Regiment, North Carolina Troops.
Enlisted at Camp Vance on October 17, 1863 for the war.
Present or accounted for until wounded in the throat and right shoulder
and captured at or near Petersburg, Virginia, April 2, 1865.
Died in hospital at Fort Monroe, Virginia, April 13, 1865 of wounds.
Hospital records give his age as 42.
[North Carolina Troops-A Roster 1861-1865; Vol 5:93]
 



  


The Wartime letters of Andrew Rink

These letters were donated by Sarah Rink Wallace, Mary Rink Harbison and Brenda Rink Witherspoon , Edna Kay Rink Stafford, and Bettie Rink Mims, and the Rink family of Catawba County, North Carolina.
We are especially grateful to them for sharing them with us.

Copyright 2001 Mary Elizabeth Rink Harbinson. All rights reserved.


Derick S. Hartshorn - 2008
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