THE KEHUKEE BAPTIST ASSOCIATION

(excerpts pertaining to Beaufort and Hyde Co., NC)

The Kehukee Baptist Association, founded with only 10 churches in 1765, grew to a membership of 5000 Baptists and 90 churches by the end of the eighteenth century. It began with the Kehukee Baptist Church in Halifax, NC, formed in 1742. The author of the history of the association, Lemuel Burkitt, took the lead in setting forth the standards for membership within this important Baptist association. This first-hand account of the rise of the Kehukee Baptist Association, deals with its formation and growth, its relationships with other associations, as well as histories of the churches involved. Individuals and churches from this association were among the first in the United States to speak out against the 'new school' doctrines and methods of evangelism that infiltrated the American Baptists between 1780 and 1840. It was the intention of the early members of the Kehukee Baptist Association to have its history written and published at the close of each generation. The first history was written by Elders Lemuel Burkitt and Jesse Read, and published in 1803.

Chapter VII

On page 224 is the following:

"The Church at Mattamuskeet, Hyde County, North Carolina"

"From the remote distance that this church is from us, we have but a small acquaintance with her state and standing. The local situation of the church, as it is environed with swamps, desarts, creeks, rivers, etc. renders it very inconvenient to get at. This church has several years been a member of our Association, but she seldom attends at our annual appointments. Her number of members, according to last accounts, was about 60. They are under the pastoral care of William Carrowon."

On page 230 is the following:

"The Church At Pungo, Beaufort County, North Carolina"

Near this place was a church of the Freewill order, of whom Elder (John) Winfield was pastor. But it was the will of divine Providence that the Gospel of the free grace of God in Christ Jesus should be preached here; and sundry persons hearing, embraced the truth, and were constituted into a church; and the church is now under the care of Elder James M'cabe [McCabe]. This church has experienced but little of the late revival. Their number at present is about thirty-two.

History
of the
Church of God

History Of The Kehukee Primitive Baptist Association,
And Of The Primitive Baptists Of America
By Elder C. B. Hassell
(With Occasional Matter By Elder S. Hassell, Indicated By The Initials "S. H.")

Chapter XX

Kehukee Association from 1765 to 1802

1793, the Association was held with the church at Skewarkey, Martin County, N.C. Three churches were by petition added to the number this year, viz.: Poplar Spring and Maple Spring, both in Franklin County, and Durham's Creek - the last named being situated in Beaufort County, N.C.

Chapter XXI

Kehukee Association from 1803 to 1833

1804, the Association convened with the church at Parker's meeting-house, Hertford County, N.C. Six newly constituted churches were received into membership at this time, viz.: Tranter's Creek, Beaufort County; Smithwick's Creek, Martin County; Swift Creek, Edgecombe County; Prospect, Edgecombe County; Mearn's Chapel, Nash County; and Sappony, Nash County.

1808, the Association met at Cross Roads, Edgecombe County. A church in Hyde County, on the South side of Mattamuskeet Lake, was received into membership at this session.

1820. The Association convened on Saturday before the first Sunday in October this year, with the church at North Creek, Beaufort County.

1822. The Association met at Cross Roads meeting-house, Edgecombe County. A church in Washington, Beaufort County, was received into membership.

1823. The Association met at Lawrence's meeting-house, Edgecombe County. A church at Goose Creek, Beaufort County, and one at Red Bud, Franklin County, petitioned for membership and were received.

1826. The Association convened at the usual time at Skewarkey, Martin County. A church situated at Little Alligator, Tyrrell County, and one at Blount's Creek, Beaufort County, were received into membership.

1828. The Association was held with the church at North Creek meeting-house, Beaufort County. Three churches were added to the number at this session, viz.: One at Grindel Creek, Pitt County; one at Old Ford, Beaufort County; and one at White Plains, Beaufort County.

1832. The Association met this year with the church at Log Chapel, or Conoho, Martin County. A church at North Mattamuskeet, Hyde County, and another at Hunting Quarters, in Carteret County, were received into membership.

1833. The Association convened at the Falls of Tar River on Saturday before the first Sunday in October. The churches at Grindel Creek, Pitt County, and Tranter's Creek, Beaufort County, having failed to represent themselves for some time past, and information being given that they had departed from the faith on which they were constituted it was resolved that they be struck from the list of churches composing this Association. This Association disapproved the course pursued by some members of the churches at Old Ford and Smithwick's Creek, who had departed from the faith, and attempted to establish other churches (so called) of another order at those places in opposition to the churches already there.

Chapter XXIII

Kehukee Association From 1834 To 1885

1834. The association was held at Cross Roads, Edgecombe County. Elder George W. Carrowan delivered the introductory sermon.

1839. The Association was held at Bethel, Beaufort County. The introductory sermon was delivered by Elder William Hyman, who was then chosen Moderator, and Eider Joseph Biggs Clerk, anti brethren R. M. G. Moore and Stephen Outterbridge Assistants.

1841. The Association was held at Little Coneto, Edgecombe County. The name of the church at Old Ford meeting-house, Beaufort County, was stricken from the list of churches, because it had been regularly dissolved, and the members had united with the church at Smithwick's Creek.

1850. The Association convened with the church at Lawrence's, Edgecombe County. The church at Blount's Creek, Beaufort County, was dismissed to unite with the churches of the Contentnea Association.

1852. The Association was held at Conoho, Martin County. The church at Goose Creek, Beaufort County, was dismissed with privilege to join the Contentnea Association.

1854. The Association convened at Deep Creek, Halifax County. Elder Alvan B. Swindle, of South Mattamuskeet Church, made confession of the wrong and disorder in the church of which he was a member, shown in retaining in fellowship, for such a long time, the notorious George W. Carrowan, whose conduct was disgraceful, and yet whose influence as pastor of the church was so great as to escape expulsion until he was tried and condemned for murder and committed suicide. The Association forgave the wrong, but signified great disapprobation of such disorder, and hoped it would never be repeated by any church belonging to the Kehukee Association.

1856. The Association was held at South Quay, Southampton County, Va. A portion of the members of the church at Washington, Beaufort County, having departed from the faith and encouraged the preaching of erroneous doctrines by one Jacob Swindle, the Association withdrew her connection from such disaffected portion of said church, including said Swindle, and warned the churches against his pernicious influence. The faithful members of said church were recognized as the true church there, and their Clerk and messenger, James W. Satchwell, received as their representative.

1876. The Association convened with the church at Bethel meetinghouse. Mattamuskeet Lake, Hyde County. The introductory sermon was preached by Elder William A. Ross. Elder C. B. Hassell was chosen Moderator, and brother J. D. Biggs Clerk, who called to his assistance brethren Bryant Bennett and S. W. Outterbridge. The Kehukee Association, in session with the church at South Mattamuskeet, made a report on the subject of the contemplated history of the Association which was received and read.

Chapter XXVI

History Of The Churches Composing The Kehukee Association In 1885

Beaverdam, Beaufort County

This church was formerly called "Washington," but changed her name in 1872. The house of worship is now situated about six miles below the town of Washington, in Beaufort County. The church was constituted in 1822, by Elders Joseph Biggs and Jeremiah Mastin. Elder Mastin took the pastoral care of the church, and served in that capacity until his death, which occurred in 1825. In 1837 Elder William Smaw took the care of the church. After his death Elders Miles Everett and Arnot Waters preached for the church. In March, 1866, Elder William B. Perry took the pastoral care of the church. In 1871 Elder Archibald Jones was chosen pastor. In 1873 Elder N. H. Harrison took the pastoral care of the church, and served her in that capacity several years.  Her Deacons have been Thomas McKeal, Levin Wallace and J. B. Litter.  Her Clerks have been Miles Everett, J. B. Archibald, George Elliot, W. G. Cooper, Jacob Swindel, James Satchwell, W. D. Singleton, J. V. Litter and Durden Aligood, who (the last named) remains in office to the present time. The regular meetings of the church are held on the second Sunday in each month and Saturday before. Membership at present, six.

North Creek, Beaufort County

The house of worship belonging to this church is situated near North Creek, in said county. Near this church there was formerly a society of the free-will order, of which one Elder (John) Winfield was pastor; but it pleased the Lord that the gospel should be preached here, and many persons embraced the truth and were constituted into a church. Elder James McCabe took the pastoral care, and continued in that office until his death in the year 1807. This church was formerly called Pungo, but the name was changed from that to North Creek. Elder Lemuel Ross had the pastoral care of the church from 1824 to 1837.
Elder Miles Eorest then served the church a few years, after which Elder Arnot Waters became pastor until 1855. Then Elder Albin B. Swindelle served as pastor until 1861. From that year to 1866 the church had no regular pastor, when Elder Bryan Whitford, of Craven County, was chosen, and has been pastor ever since; but of late years he visits the church only once or twice annually, while Elder D. W. Topping, who was ordained in June, 1870, by Elders N. H. Harrison and Bryan Whitford, has been serving the church monthly. In 1868 the membership increased to about seventy, but a season of coldness followed. The present number in fellowship is twenty. John Satchwell and William Ross were among the first Clerks. Ira H. Topping, father of Elder D. W. Topping, was Clerk from March, 1868, till his death in March, 1883. The present Clerk is William Baynor, and the Deacon is J. S. Sadler. The regular meetings occur on the third Sunday in each month and Saturday before. - [Last paragraph by S. H.]

Pungo, Beaufort County

This church was constituted in the year 1824, with members dismissed from North Creek Church, and became a member of the Association in 1825, with fifteen members. Her meeting-house is situated near the head of Pungo River. She was many years ago troubled a good deal by the preaching of the doctrines of the general atonement, etc., which produced some dissension among her members, and in order to restore harmony she had to expel several members.  Among her occasional and regular pastors were Elders Ross Carrowan, Miles Eorest, G. W. Carrowan and A. B. Swindelle. During the war the church had no pastor, and got into a low condition. In 1866 Elder N. H. Harrison was chosen pastor, and served the church until 1879, when Elder Daniel W. Topping was chosen pastor, and still continues to serve the church in that capacity.  The number of members is twenty-four. H. L. Davis is the present Clerk, and Daniel Paul the Deacon. Two of the members of this church, David Carter and Aquila Paul, have been licensed to exercise their gifts in public.  The regular meetings of this church take place the second Sunday in each month and Saturday before. - [Last three paragraphs by S. H.]

South Mattamuskeet, Hyde County

This church held her meetings originally on the south side of Mattamuskeet Lake, but now on the north side. It is the only church in the county, but there are several meeting places scattered around for convenience to the members. The constitution of this church does not appear, but in 1802 she was under the pastoral care of Elder William Carrowan, and consisted of about sixty members.  After the death of Elder Carrowan she was served by Elder John Bray. Elder Green Carrowan, son of Elder William Carrowan, was raised up to the ministry in this church and ordained to the administration of gospel ordinances. He took the pastoral care of her, and continued in the discharge of that office until he moved into Beaufort County and gathered a church on Goose Creek. Elder George W. Carrowan succeeded Elder Green Carrowan [brothers]; Elder A. B. Swindelle succeeded him, and Elder Albert Cartwright succeeded Elder Swindelle. Elder Cartwright is pastor of the church at present, and is a very useful and worthy minister of the gospel. The church is in a prosperous condition. Her monthly meetings are on the first Sunday and Saturday before. She now has one hundred and fourteen members [1885].

White Plains, Beaufort County

This church was organized by members dismissed from Beaverdam, a branch of the church at Washington. Her house of worship is situated between the towns of Washington and Plymouth. Upon her organization Elder Miles Everett, one of her own members, accepted the pastoral care of her. She was received a member of the Association in 1828, with about twenty members.  In March, 1840, Elder Jonathan Wallace took the pastoral care of the church, and Elder Arnot Waters was often with him in preaching for the church. Elder Wallace died in 1862, and Elder Waters continued preaching for the church until his death, which occurred April 24, 1866, aged about seventy years. In July, 1866, Elder Redding W. Peacock took the pastoral care of the church, and so continued to serve her until his death. In 1870 Elder N. H. Harrison took the pastoral care of the church, and served in that capacity several years.  Deacons: In 1828 brethren Asa Oden and George Harris were ordained Deacons. In 1835 John Haborn was ordained. In 1850 Levin Osbourn was ordained. In 1872 Langley R. Bowen and Thomas H. Wallace were ordained, and remain in office to the present time. Clerks: John Windley was chosen Clerk in 1828, Levin Osbourn in 1840, and James G. Bowen in 1850; the last named brother continues serving the church to the present time. Monthly meetings are held on the first Sunday in each month and the previous day. Number in fellowship, forty-eight.

Sources:
"A Concise History Of The Kehukee Baptist Association From Its Original Rise Down To 1803," by Elders Lemuel Burkitt and Jesse Read, Halifax, Printed by A. Hodges, 1803.
"A Concise History of the Kehukee Baptist Association, From its Original Rise to the Present Time," by Joseph Biggs, Tarboro, Printed and Published by George Howard, Office of the Tarborough Free Press, 1834
"History of the Church of God, From the Creation to A. D. 1885; Includeing Especially the History of the Kehukee Primitive Baptist Association," by Elders Cushing Biggs Hassell and Sylvester Hassell, Middletown, N.Y., 1886.

See: History of the Church of God, From the Creation to A. D. 1885, Providence Baptist Ministries.

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